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Full text of "Christian Cynosure"

CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE national christian association. 



WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor. 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-flve centa; single 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription Is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 
Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 

at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 

March S, 1879. 

CONTENTS 



N. C. A. Annual Meeting. 1 

Helpful Agitations, by Miss Susan F. ' 

Hinman 1 

An English Lighthouse, by Thos. Mulli- 
gan 2 

A Live Ministerial Association, by C. 

G. Sterling 3- 

The United Presbyterians, by Williston 

B. Stoddard '. 4 

Annual Meeting Program....... -.". 5 

The Burial of The Dead, by C. A. 

Blanchard 8 

Black Hand and Black List, by Alex- 
ander Thomson 12 

The Broken Seal, by Samuel D. Greene. 14 
Editorial — 

Secret Societies A Pest 7 19 

He Helped Initiate 20 

The Mysterious Senussi 20 

It Alters the Case 20 

News of Our Work — 

Pennsylvania Report : 21 

Impressions of the State Convention, 

by R. A. McCoy 24 

Michigan Association, Executive Com- 
mittee Meeting , . . . 25 

A Valuable Worker 25 

Secretary Stoddard's Letter 25 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 26 

From Agent Davidson 28 

The Clique Spirit 29 

"Beware of Dogs," by Evangelist 

Davis 29 

The Masonic Plan, by Rev. T. M. 
Dalton • 30 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, Rev. E, B. Stewart; Vice- 
President, Rev. J. W. Brink; Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond (Congregational), J. 
M. Hitchcock (Independent), G. A. 
Blanchard (Congregational), G. J. Haan 
(Christian Reformed), Albert B. Rutt 
(Mennonite), E. B. Stewart (United 
Presbyterian), Joseph Amick (Church of 
the Brethren), E. R. Worrell (Presby- 
terian), D. S. Warner (Free Methodist), 
T. C. Wendell (Free Methodist) and P. 
A. Kittilsby (Lutheran). 



Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 1514 Jordan St., 
Shreveport, La. 

Rev. John Nelson, 909 E. Lyon St., 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 

Rev. B. E. Bergesen, 1727 West 56th 
St., Seattle, Wash. 

J. S. Baxter, 414 West 7th St., Okla- 
homa City, Okla. 



HOUSE FOR SALE. 

Anyone desiring to purchase a home 
in Wheaton, Illinois, will do well to write 
the Editor of the Cynosure for particu- 
lars about a seven-room house, modern 
improvements, four lots, and within three 
blocks of two depots, and about the same 
distance from Wheaton College. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to tne world; and in secret have I sai<rnothing=" John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLV. 



CHICAGO, MAY, 1912. 



NUMBER 1. 



N. C. A. ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the' N. C. A. 
occurs on Thursday and Friday, May 
23 and 24, in Second United .Presby- 
terian Church, corner 65th St. and Par- 
nell Ave., Englewood, Chicago, 111. 

The opening session will be at 7 :30 
o'clock Thursday evening, followed by 
a Friday morning session at 9:30, an 
afternoon session at 2 :00 and an even- 
ing session at 7 :30. Besides the elec- 
tion of officers and the transaction of 
other important business, there will be 
addresses by able speakers. 

Elmer B. Stewart, President. 
Nora E. Kellogg, Recording Secretary. 



HELPFUL AGITATIONS. 

San Francisco, Cal., April 12, 190. 
Mr. W. I. Phillips, Chicago. 111. 

Dear Mr. Phillips : I thank you for 
your invitation to the annual meeting of 
the National Christian Association to be 
held next month. As it is not possible 
to go, I want to have a small share in 
helping it on, by contributing towards 
the expense. 

For some months I have been intend- 
ing to write you, calling- your attention 
to the serial now running in McClures 
Magazine, by Owen Johnson, "Stover at 
Yale.'' The story would not interest 
you particularly, as it goes far to justify 
the late Mr. Crane's objections to col- 
lege life, except that you would appre- 
ciate the significance of the writer's at- 
titude toward college fraternities. These 
he decidedly opposes, and his opposition 
furnishes the theme of the whole story. 



His objections he places for the most 
part in the mouth of Brockhurst, a stu- 
dent whom he introduces, almost apolo- 
getically, as a person of very revolution- 
ary ideas. His arguments against the 
fraternities are two-fold, their opposition 
to democracy and their deadening influ- 
ence on the intellect. One of the most 
striking passages in the story relates how 
Stover, the hero, tears his society pin 
from his tie and throws it on the floor, 
when he learns that the fraternity seeks 
to forbid his acquaintance with the men 
in the University whom he deems best 
worth knowing. 

The "Literary Digest''' of April 6, un- 
der the heading "Mental Dearth of Col- 
lege Boys," quotes freely from Mr. John- 
son's story and from an interview with 
Mr. Johnson himself in the Xew York 
Times. Mr. Johnson tells the reporter 
that "the intellectual weakness of the 
college is due to the social system," by 
which he means the fraternities. His 
words are : 

''The fraternities and secret societies, which 
were formerly intellectual in their purpose and 
leanings, were the convenient instruments at 
hand when the great social struggle outside 
swept into the colleges and overwhelmed them. 
They were supported in opposition to the 
spontaneous democracy that finds its natural 
leaders and .natural groupings. With the so- 
cial movement in possession, everything be- 
came closely organized, for the sake of the 
gradations and positions which organization 
gives. The organization chokes out every- 
thing else. . . .At first [the authorities] 
sheltered themselves behind the convenient ex- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



cuse of non-interference with undergraduate 
activities, and so allowed the social system to 
assume the proportions of a property institu- 
tion. The property so owned at Yale alone is 
valued at $1,000,000. Instead of taking drastic 
measures, they allowed the system to build up 
to a strength that would make any university 
head quail. To them it is as the tariff ques- 
tion to a Republican president. They are 
afraid to touch it. and while they know and 
must admit that the men learn nothing and 
are only bluffing their way along, they find 
what comfort they can in talking of natural 
ambition and calling the college a 'school for 
character.' " 

Mr. Johnson, unlike Mr. Crane, is not 
an outsider, but a Y r ale man himself. 
This is what he says, in the character of 
Brockhurst, of the "cherished traditional 
secrecy" of the Yale fraternities: 

"The harm is that this mumbo- jumbo, fee- 
fi-fo-fum, high-cockalorum business is taken 
seriously. It's the effect on the young imag- 
ination that comes here that is harmful. Dink, 
I tell you, snd I mean it solemnly, that when 
a boy comes here to Yale, or any other Amer- 
ican college, and gets the flummery in his sys- 
tem, believes in it — surrenders to it — so that 
he trembles in the shadow of a tomblike build- 
ing, doesn't dare to look at a pin .that stares 
him in the face, is afraid to pronounce, the 
holy, sacred name — when he has got to that 
point he has ceased to think, and no amount 
of college life is going to revive him. It's 
wrong, fundamentally wrong ; it's a crime 
against the. whole moving spirit of university 
history — the history of struggle for the libera- 
tion of the human mind. 

"I would strip them of all nonsense; in fact, 
that is their, weakness, not their strength, and 
it is all unnecessary. This is what I'd do: 
drop the secrecy— this extraordinary, muffled, 
breathless guarding of an empty can — retain 
the privilege any club has of excluding out- 
siders, stop this childishness of getting up and 
leaving the room if some old lady happens to 
ask are you a Bones man or a Keys man.'' 

Is it not gratifying that these truths 
cire given to the large public afforded by 
the readers of McClure's? 

Cordially yours, 

Susan F.. Hinman. 



AN ENGLISH LIGHTHOUSE. 



X. C. A. annual meeting May 23d, 
24th in 2d United Presbyterian church, 
cor. 65th St. and Parnell Ave., Chicago. 



Headley, England, April 1, 191 2. 
Dear Mr. Editor: 

I am enclosing subscription *for 
Cynosure and am glad to see the cause 
it represents so strong and vigorous. 

I wish we had some sort of an organ- 
ization here: it's easier to get along and- 
work when one has some backing. Paul 
says: "At my first answer no man stood 
with me/' but there are few in the 
Lord's army who can sustain a good 
fight all alone. And this same Paul, who 
stood his ground against all odds, de- 
clares later: "I was glad of the coming 
of Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achai- 
cus." I was just wondering if the kind 
and generous Cynosure would not some- 
time send us over one of its able agents 
and give us a start! 

There is considerable feeling here at 
present against secret lodges, but they 
are so powerful .in this country that the 
press, both religious and secular, dare 
not permit the smallest squeak of oppo- 
sition and there is no means of getting 
this feeling articulated. 

Secret societies in this country are 
growing stronger and threatening to 
strangle the nation and I believe, that 
unless these organized forces of dark- 
ness are broken up, they will break up 
our modern civilization. One powerful 
secret order in this country at the pres- 
ent time is holding up the entire nation, 
and the government is at its wits' end 
to know what to do. It looks as if the 
foundations are being broken . up and 
men's hearts are failing them for fear. 
However, "the Lord reigneth," and "the 
foundation of God standeth sure." 

When crossing the turbulent waters 
between Ireland and Wales a few months 
ago, I passed one of the most magnificent 
lighthouses I have ever seen. Out in 
the deep, dark waters, hard and fast on 
the rock, the great structure stood out' 
bold against the storm — throwing out 
into the darkness its great volumes of 
pure light, which swept the shores of 
both countries. It was only the other 
day that I got the real meaning of th'e 
word Cynosure — the light that shines in 
the night. As Paddy said he liked the 
moon much better than the sun as she 
shone at night where light was most 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



needed. Well, Cynosure, shine away. 
Thy pure rays reach out far beyond the 
shores of Uncle Sam. 

A little time ago I met a prominent 
minister in Dublin with whom I was well 
acquainted, and seeing" him coming I be- 
gan to fumble in my pocket for some 
Cynosure tracts, as I knew a few of his 
people were steeped in Masonry. But 
I had only just turned on the light when 
he laughed and said : "Oh, yes, I know, 
man dear; I'm just 'finishing 'Bernard's 
Light on Masonry.' What do you think 
of those people over there? Can we. de- 
pend on what they publish?" I assured 
him the "gospel of the Cynosure was 
neither fanatical nor tainted, afnd that 
the light that shines out from that com- 
pany was nothing more or less than a 
bit of that light that "lighteth every man 
that cometh into the world." 

Shine on "star of the north" until He 
comes, whose light shall destroy all dark- 
ness and all the works of darkness with 
the effulgence of his glory. 

Thos. Mulligan. 



A LIVE MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION. 

Dear Brother Phillips : The Stark 
County Illinois Ministerial Association 
held a session on March 18th. One of 
the papers presented and discussed was 
on the subject of Secret Societies. The 
writer of the pap.er is a United Presby- 
terian, and he gave a strong argument. 
Of the other nine ministers present, six 
were Methodist Episcopal (one Swed- 
ish), one Baptist, one Congregationalist 
and one Presbyterian. 

The paper was discussed thoroughly 
and with animation. There were pres- 
ent three secret society members — one 
A. O. U. W., one Odd Fellow and one 
Mason. The first of these stated that 
he had joined, in another State, for in- 
surance only, which he kept up ; that 
he did not think he would be in it ex- 
cept for that ; that he had always re- 
fused invitations to join any other se- 
cret societies, including- the Masons, by 
whom he had often been solicited. He 
stated that his father had been a Mason, 
but had counseled his sons not to join. 

The Odd Fellow^ said he had joined 
that order that he might show the world's, 
people that Church people did not wish 



to be exclusive. He had found the ex- 
ercises of the order a waste of time, and 
did not attend tjiem. 

The Mason, who was one of the first 
called upon after the reader, gave an 
enthusiastic, comprehensive, forceful (as 
to language) defense of Masonry, cov- 
ering every point made by the reader of 
the paper. 

The Presbyterian -Was next in order, 
and, being a new member; created some 
surprise, seemingly, by proving himself 
as ardent an opponent of Secretism as 
the -United Presbyterian. This fact was 
perhaps the more unexpected because 
of the fact that the other Presbyterian 
belonging to the Union — not present on 
this occasion — was known to be a Ma- 
son. This speaker directed his remarks 
to the argument made by the Mason. 
In his discussion with the Masonic broth- 
er clergyman, he twice, by implication, 
admitted charges made against his or- 
der. In his contention that justice was 
often perverted because of masonic 
pledges to favoritism — which the ma- 
sonic clergyman disputed — he referred 
to the "murder anal treason excepted" 
clause, and asked him if that did not 
make it plain that protection for crimi- 
nals in other crimes was contemplated? 
He replied that the "connection in which 
the words were used" showed that that 
was not " There he caught him- 
self, perhaps discovering that he had 
made an unintended admission. At an- 
other time in the course of the discus- 
sion, the horrible penalties attached to 
the obligations were referred to. His 
reply again constituted an admission, for 
he argued that these were "archaic ex- 
pressions," which were not intended seri- 
ously now, and further, that no provision 
was made for their enforcement. This, 
he seemed to think, removed the objec- 
tion to them. 

It might be said, further, that this ma- 
sonic member said, with emphasis, that 
the claims for great antiquity of ma- 
sonry were utterly unfounded. He gave 
it a modern date. 

As one after ariother of the remaining 
members were called upon, it was de- 
lightful to discover that none, except the 
on^>s above mentioned, were lodge mem- 
bers, and to hear from .three more of the 
speakers (two Methodists and a Bap- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



tist) vigorous. stirring indictments 
against the Lodge. These men all spoke 
from the standpoint of personal obser- 
vation of its effects on spiritual life and 
church prosperity. The Mason, who at 
first was very confident, really seemed 
by this time to feel quite lonely. 

With best wishes for the work, yours 
cordiallv, C. G. Sterling. 



THE UNITED PRESBYTERIANS. 

BY WILLISTON B. STODDARD. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 23, 191 2. 
Dear Cynosure : 

Among the many church denomina- 
tions which have stood with us against 
the Lodge, the United Presbyterian has 
always been counted. Twenty-five years 
ago when I met a United Presbyterian, 
I did not have to inquire whether he or 
she was connected with any secret so- 
cietv. The pastors then proclaimed anti- 
lodge truths as well as other Bible 
truths. Sessions were faithful in regard 
to this matter, and the church was prac- 
tically clear of those who showed their 
unchristian character by clinging to un- 
christian institutions. 

The difficulty in the enforcement of 
the law came with the advent of a multi- 
tude of what are known as the minor 
lodges. 

The situation grows worse with time. 
At first only members of the minor or- 
ders were admitted into church member- 
ship. Then the \Iasons and Odd Fel- 
lows were received by the sessions of 
some churches. It is only of late that the 
ministers have begun to unite with the 
Masons. I append an editorial found 
in The United Presbyterian, January 
1 8th, 1912, said to have been written bv 
Editor A. G. Wallace, D. D. It ex- 
presses their doctrinal position, and 
points to a situation that should exist. 
Will a majority of our United Presbyte- 
rian friends be content to harbor the evil 
which has come to them through fear of 
the lodge ? or will they arouse in an effort 
to rid themselves of that which the 
fathers taught was disloyalty to Christ, 
and destructive of true spiritual power? 



MINISTERS AND SECRET ORDERS. 

We are asked concerning the relation which 
a minister of the United Presbyterian Church 



sustains to secret orders. May he become a 
member ? 

The doctrinal position of the United Pres- 
byterian Church is that "all associations that 
impose upon their members an oath of secrecy, 
or an obligation to obey a code of unknown 
lazvs, are inconsistent with the genius and 
spirit of Christianity, and church members 
ought not to have fellowship with such asso- 
ciations." 

The statement is very clear and stands to- 
day, many times over, re-emphasized by the 
deliverances of the highest court of the 
church. Not at any time has the church mod- 
ified this doctrinal declaration. 

Secret orders are not in harmony with the 
Church of the Lord Jesus. They violate the 
equality of all members -in the Christian broth- 
erhood. They are not in harmony with the 
fundamental principles of democratic civil 
government. They create an inner circle 
among those who are associated on a common 
platform of equal rights, and so separate those 
who by right are on equal footing. 

This extends through all the social organi- 
zation. It is abnormal, for example, for a man 
to be a member of an order in which he is 
limited in his essential and vital relations, so 
that he is under solemn obligations not to 
make known to his fellow citizen, or associate 
in the church, or the members of his family, 
the doings of the order. It is abnormal for a 
man to be bound not to tell his wife or chil- 
dren what takes place within the closed doors. 
It is abnormal and against the genius and 
spirit of Christianity, for a member of the 
church to shut off a part of his life about 
which he may not talk with his pastor. 

There are other objections to such orders. 
As, for example, the liability of their perver- 
sion to evil and criminal purposes. At the 
present time the country has a remarkable il- 
lustration of such perversion. The object of 
an order may not be wrong in itself, but the 
fundamental principle is not in harmony with 
the teachings and life of Christ. With such 
associations, church members ought not to 
have fellowship. 

In the sessional administration there has not 
been uniformity, but the right of the session 
to exercise some discretion in the admission to 
membership in the church has been admitted. 
This general discretionary power has been 
more distinctly set forth in the present Book 
of Government. But the attitude of the church 
toward secret, oath-bound orders has not been 
modified. 

There is one law for the member and the 
minister, neither should be a member of such 
associations. Both stand in the same rela- 
tion to the church, except that a minister, as 
an official representative of the church and a 
teacher of the things of God, should always 
and under all circumstances in his own life, 
be an example to the members under his 
charge and to all people of the spirit of Christ 
and the genius of Christianity. A consistent 
life is not only a duty of the highest obligation 
but a spiritual power in the ministry. — Edito- 
rial in The United Presbyterian. 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



(jTonbention 



OF THE 



Rational Christian association 

THURSDAY AND FRIDAY 

MAY 23rd and 24th, 1912 




B. T. ROBERTS 

Pastor, Editor and Bishop 



For us to keep silent re- 
specting Masonry, and thus 
tacitly endorse the idea that 
a man can both acceptChrist 
and deny Him — that is, be 
a good Mason and a good 
Christian atthe same time — 
would be treason to Christ. 
—B. T. Roberts. 



TO BE HELD IN 

^)econO SilntteD |&re0ftpteuan Cfmrci) 

Cor. 65th St. and Parnell Ave., CHICAGO 

This Church is reached by the South Side Elevated cars. Take Normal Park 

Car, Englewood Branch, to 65th Street Station, or Surface 

Electric Cars, transferring to 63rd Street, and 

getting off at Parnell Avenue 



Address All Inquiries to 'Wm. I. Phillips, General Secretary, 
850 "West Madison Street, Chicago 



Pastors and Editors are Requested to Announce. All Welcome, Especially 
Members of Secret Orders 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. May, 1912. 



Programme 



tlimrgtmp (Rmttno; Btszton 

7:30 flDYIocfe &econ& ainiteH ©resfapterian Cijurri) 

(JBnglctoooD, Chicago 

OPENING EXERCISES 



ADDRESS OF WELCOME — Rev. I. G. Martin, Pastor Nazarene Church, 
Chicago 



RESPONSE — Rev. E. B. Stewart, President of National Christian Association 



ADDRESS — "Is Lodge Connection Helpful to Christian Life?" — Rev. J, 
A. Alexander, Crafton, Pennsylvania 



ADDRESS — "Many Sided Experiences" — Rev. E. Y. Woolley, Chicago 



MUSIC AND COLLECTION 



J&L&L& 



jFtttmp horning &t&&ion 

10:00 ©'dock &cconH ftniteti ©resbpterian Ci)urci) 

dBnsIetooon, Chicago 

OPENING EXERCISES 



THIS WILL BE A BUSINESS SESSION OF ANNUAL REPORTS, 
APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES AND ELECTION OF 
OFFICERS FOR THE ENSUING YEAR, ETC. ANYONE 
INTERESTED IS INVITED TO ATTEND. 



May, 1912. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 





Programme 






jfri&ap Mtttnoon Session 




2:00 ©'clock 


&ccont) anttcti Idxc 
(GncjdetDOoti 

OPENING EXERCISES 


sbptcrian Ci)uxct) 
, Chicago 


FREE PARLIAMENT FIVE MINUTE ADDRESSES — Leaders: Rev. L. 

V. Harrell (Michigan), Rev. Alfred E. Meyer (Illinois), Rev. E. C. 

• Mason (Indiana), Rev. J. J. Hiemenga (Michigan), Rev. E. J. Tanis 

(Wisconsin), Mrs. Lizzie Woods Roberson (Tennessee) , Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard (D. C.) and others 


ADDRESS— Rev. Wm. Dillon, D. D., Editor CHRISTIAN CONSERVA- 
TOR, Huntington, Indiana 




JfciJ&Jfc 




• 


jfri&ap doming &es«3ion 




7:30 ©'clock 


§cconti QnitcU ©rcabpterian Ctjurci) 
(CnglctoootJ, (Chicago 




OPENING EXERCISES 




ADDRESS— 
mann 


'Insurance Lodges and the Church" — Rev. 
Pastor Evangelical Lutheran Church 


M. P. F. Doer- 


ADDRESS— "Union Labor Lodges"— President C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton 
College 


QUESTIONS ANSWERED 

* 





CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Mav. 1912. 



THE BURIAL OF THE DEAD. 

From the beginning of the life of man 
until the present hour, death has been 
a mystery. For that matter, so also is 
life, and we do not know what either one 
or the other is. We speak of life as 
the ability of an organic being- to re- 
spond to environment, and death is the 
inability so to do. When the eyes can- 
not see, the ears cannot hear, the feel- 
ings cannot touch, the lungs cannot re- 
ceive the air we say the man is dead. 

This wonderful mystery is associated, 
in all civilized countries, with certain 
rites which signalize the end of time and 
the beginning of eternity for a living be- 
ing. 

The Thought of Immortality. 

The desire for continued existence is 
almost or quite universal. At times sin 
and shame work such wreck in the hu- 
man soul that men take their own lives, 
leap unbidden into the blackness of the 
future, but where one goes thus a thou- 
sand go otherwise, and it is doubtful if 
even in the case of the suicide there is 
or is not a hope for future life. It is 
in the Gospel that life and immortality 
are brought to light. The philosophers 
doubted, hoped, but did not even pro- 
fess to know. It is only when we open 
the word of God that we come to clear, 
definite statements like this : "Then 
shall the dust return to the earth as it 
was and the spirit to God who gave it." 
But the longing for immortality and the 
longing for a happy immortality is near- 
ly if not altogether universal among' men. 
Even Balaam said : "Let me die the 
death of the righteous and let my last 
end be like his." Pagan religions gen- 
erally undertake to satisfy this longing 
of the human heart. They have their 
Happy Hunting Grounds or their Celes- 
tial Circles where they teach that per- 
sons who are faithful, true, righteous 
and ceremonious may hope to spend an 
eternity of happiness. 



Not Sin But Religion the Opponent of 
Christianity. 

Dr. Stough, one of our earnest and 
successful evangelists, remarked in an 
address given a year or two since that it 
had been a great surprise to him to learn 
that the opponent of Christianity was not 
sin as such but religion. I wish I might 
develop the thought as clearly and fully 
as he did, but this is impossible. The 
substance of his remark, however, as I 
recall it, was that false religions were 
the institutions which secured the al- 
legiance of men and thus hindered them 
from becoming Christians. He would 
not of course have denied that sin also 
is a great reason for men's failure to 
identify themselves with the Christian 
church, but that he was right as to his 
main contention I think is true beyond 
question. The evidences which have led 
to this train of thought are the memor- 
ial services which are now being held by 
secret societies of all sorts and kinds in 
memory of their deceased brethren. I 
do not know the precise order in which 
these memorial services came to be in- 
vented but in the. present time there is a 
perfect rush of secret lodges into the 
business of holding such services for the 
dead. The effort is generally made to 
secure some church for a morning serv- 
ice. The lodges, which are largely com- 
posed of Godless men who care nothing 
whatever about the churches, wish to be 
permitted to attend in a body and in uni- 
form. Not infrequently they desire to< 
be led by a band of music and in this 
manner these men, most of whom have 
no sympathy with the church, do not at- 
tend it, support it, or care for it, march 
through the streets in their lodge habili- 
ments, take their places in the center of 
the auditorium and listen to a sermon 
which is intended to be a glorification of 
the order. 

Even those lodges which were organ- 
ized by actors, saloonkeepers and the 



Mav. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



like, now have their memorial services 
just as the Freemasons, Odd Fellows and 
the Grand Army of the Republic do. I 
suppose that the moral tone of the or- 
ganization known as Eagles is as low as 
that of any other secret society which 
ever existed, yet these Eagle lodges are 
getting preachers and others to surren- 
der churches to their use and to laud and 
advertise the lodges which are already 
destroying the Christian churches of 
every land. A clipping was recently 
handed me by Secretary Phillips which 
so fully illustrates the situation that I 
copy it entire. The meeting was held in 
Rochester, Pennsylvania, and the account 
in a local paper reads as follows : 

The joint memorial service held in the Ma- 
jestic theatre, Rochester, Sunday afternoon by 
the Fraternal Order of" Eagles for departed 
members was of a very impressive nature and 
was largely attended. The Aeries participat- 
ing were Ambridge No. 1365, Aliquippa No. 
1708, Beaver Valley No. 1226, Freedom No. 
1229 and Monaca No. 4412. The members of 
the various Aeries assembled in the hall of 
Beaver Valley Aerie and marched in a body 
to the theatre, the stage of which was appro- 
priately decorated for the occasion. 

The deceased members in whose memory 
the service was held are George Holt and 
Peter McCabe, Ambridge Aerie; Thomas B. 
Price. John Carline and Joseph Fix, Beaver 
Valley Aerie ; H. J. Kettering, Freedom Aerie, 
and John M. Shroades, Monaca Aerie. 

The program was of unusual excellence, in- 
cluding the opening exercises of the order by 
the Worthy Chaplain, the calling the roll of 
deceased members by the Worthy Secretary : 
a masterly and eloquent oration by Grand Vice 
President W. J. Brennen and a fitting eulogy 
voiced by the Rev. Dr. J. H. Bailsman, pastor 
of the First Congregational church of 
Rochester. 

The foregoing features were interspersed 
with music of a high order, including selec- 
tions by Elstner's orchestra and numbers by 
the Harris Male Quartette. 

Balaam the Son of Bosor. 

The hrst prophet, who wanted to curse 
Israel for the sake of getting money and 
who betrayed Israel into sin, is often in 
my mind when T think of these terrible 



gatherings. Is there any intelligent min- 
i ;+er in the world who does not know 
that the lodges are destroying the 
church? I doubt if there is one. Xot 
long since in one of our meetings in Chi- 
cago a man who professes to be a Chris- 
tian worker rose and publicly announced 
himself as a Freemason. He said that 
he did not attend the meetings at pres- 
ent but that if he was in business he 
should do so. Yet he knew that the pen- 
alties of the first three degrees were to 
have the throat cut across, the tongue 
torn out, the heart and vitals taken out, 
the body cut in two and the bowels 
burned to ashes in the middle. He knew 
that Freemasons are sworn not to cheat, 
not to slander, not to rob, not to live 
immorally with Freemasons or their rela- 
tives. He knew that Freemasons are 
obliged to obey the signs, summons and 
tokens given, handed, sent or thrown by 
lodges or Masons and yet he said that he 
was a Christian, that he was a Free- 
mason and that if he was in business he 
should attend the meetings of the order. 

judge Not That Ye Be Not Judged. 

We are glad that it is not our office 
to decide respecting the spiritual stand- 
ing of men. It is, however, our duty to 
have a clear opinion as to the character 
of institutions. We are bound to know 
for ourselves and to teach others whether 
such organizations as these are inno- 
cent and helpful or otherwise. I do not 
believe one man in the world really be- 
lieves that an organization which im- 
poses such penalties as I have above re- 
ferred to is in accord with the teaching 
of the Holy Spirit. How can he ? The 
spirit of Jesus Christ is meek and lowly 
and gentle. All His appeals are to rea- 
son and conscience and kindliness. Such 
bloody imprecations as we find in Ma- 
sonry and such partial obligations as we 
find in all secret societies are absolutely 
foreign to the spirit of Jesus Christ. 

Someone mav saw "Well, then, you 



10 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



intend to unchristianize all men who be- 
long to such organizations ?" I answer, 
"I do not judge men, that is not my of- 
fice." Nor is it the office of any other 
man. Jesus Christ is our judge. He 
knows all the facts and will judge us 
with perfect love and at the same time 
with perfect equity. But no Christian 
man ought to connect himself with or- 
ganizations which are anti-Christian in 
spirit. Salvation comes through Jesus 
Christ alone. Any organization which 
teaches directly or indirectly that it is 
otherwise obtained is a demon-possessed 
and ruled organization. There is one 
God and one mediator between God and 
man, the man Christ Jesus. There is no 
salvation apart from Him. Any organ- 
izations that teach that there is, are of 
their father Satan and will do his work 
in the hearts and lives and homes of 
men. 

"If the Light That Is In Thee Be Dark- 
ness." 

An evangelist whose name is unknown 
to us recently held a meeting in an Ohio 
town. He had, as is common now, a 
number of helpers, large audiences and 
great apparent results. At the close of 
his meetings he organized the boys of 
the town in a secret order named Kappa 
Sigma Pi. The friend who informs us 
respecting this new evangelist with his 
new sort of work sends us the following 
clipping from a local paper : 

There is no question now about the success 
of the new Kappa Sigma Pi reading room and 
gymnasium. About $300 has been guaranteed 
to pay the running expense for the first year. 
Deck's hall has been rented, partitioned off 
into a gym., reading room, etc., and incidentally 
a room for the "goat." Every Monday even- 
ing five fellows get theirs. Now to furnish 
the room without expense. The boys send 
this request to you. They want second-hand 
(not cast-off and worn-out) furnishings. They 
ask for 3 rugs, 4 mattresses, 4 pairs Indian 
clubs, 4 pairs dumb bells, pictures in frames, 
mirrors, couch, all kinds of gym. parapher- 
nalia. Of course they prefer new stuff. If 



you are in the movement to help the boys, look 
around the house and see what you can spare. 
Call up Miles' office and the dray will call for 
your present. 

What will those boys do in that secret 
hall which they have rented and parti- 
tioned off and are begging Christian peo- 
ple to furnish? A Methodist pastor not 
long since told me that the high school 
boys of his town had organized a secret 
society and were asking his son to unite. 
He said they had rented a secret hall, as 
these boys did and apart from teachers, 
pastors and parents they were holding 
their meetings in this hall. They wished 
his boy to join and he said before giving 
his consent he made an investigation as 
to the work that was going forward. He 
said, "I found it worse than Sodom and 
Gomorrah and told my boy that the 
farther he could keep from a place of 
that kind the better it would be for him." 
The experience is the common experi- 
ence of all men who have studied the 
lodge movement ; but why should a 
preacher, who goes into a town and se- 
cures a union meeting of churches and 
gets scores or hundreds of persons to 
profess to be converted to Jesus Christ, 
lend himself to work of this kind? Is 
it another case of Balaam the son of 
Bosor, a man who loves the wages of un- 
righteousness and who is willing to earn 
them as best he can ? But is it not an 
unspeakable shame and outrage that the 
church of Jesus Christ should be asked 
to support such a man and to furnish 
him with the platform on which he is 
to do his deadly work? I have often 
said that if evil institutions were com- 
pelled to pay their own bills they would 
cease to be. This is true of the liquor 
shops, the gambling business, the lodge 
business and all other forms of parasitic 
growth ; these institutions live on the in- 
dustry, the economy and the fidelity of 
godly men and women. May God open 
the eyes of men until they shall cease to 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



be willing to be taxed for the support of 
these iniquitous forms of organization 
among men. 

The Crescent and the Scimitar. 
I was the other day in the store of a 
neighbor who had been, as 1 was told, 
a Woodman. I had never heard of his 
connecting himself with the masonic fra- 
ternity. I was therefore surprised and 
grieved to see on his coat the badge of 
the Mystic Shrine. This is another of 
the outgrowths of Blue Lodge masonry. 
It is composed of men who want the fun, 
and worse, of what are sometimes called 
"higher degrees." A lady whose hus- 
band was a member of this organization, 
said to me only this week, "That is the 
funny part of Freemasonry..' ' She said 
that her husband was a member of the 
Presbyterian church, that she herself was 
a Christian and yet that she was identi- 
fied with the women's branches of this 
masonic organization. But I wish to 
speak a moment about my neighbor. 

Lodge Men, Not Church Men. 
To begin with, he has been raised in 
a Christian community, but he has never 
identified himself with the Christian 
church. From time to time his friends 
have complained of the churches in the 
vicinity as if they were responsible for 
his condition. This may in part be true. 
I think very few of us would wish to 
say that we or the church of which we 
are members have done all that we ought 
or that we could for the helping of men, 
but is this £ full explanation of the case? 
I doubt it very much. This young man 
wears the scimitar and the crescent. Xow 
what do the scimitar and the crescent 
represent? The crescent is the badge of 
the Turkish nation and the scimitar is 
the sacred weapon of the Saracens. It 
was with this Turkish sword that the 
battles were fought for the extirpation 
of the Christian religion. When I was 
going down the Danube river T saw at 



various points great monuments which 
had been erected to commemorate the 
repulse of Turkish armies a thousand 
years before. In those awful struggles 
the Christian soldiery were cut down by 
the scimitar and it is this sword which 
this young man, in this Christian land 
was wearing on his coat as a badge of 
the organization to which he had united 
himself. He does not think well enough 
of the church to unite with it but he 
thinks well enough of the Mystic Shrine 
to wear the scimitar and the crescent. 

This young man not only has been 
raised in a Christian community, but his 
wife is the daughter of a Christian min- 
ister and his children are in some meas- 
ure at least in touch with the Christian 
church. Now what does the Turkish na- 
tion and the Turkish religion stand for 
and do as regards homes ? When I was 
in Constantinople I walked by the close- 
ly screened windows of homes. From 
time to time we would hear a rustle with- 
in and occasionally would catch a glimpse 
of some women, hurrying away from the 
window least she be observed by some 
passing man. The principle of social or- 
ganization in that country is that one 
man may have two or ten or twenty 
wives as he may arrange. If the prin- 
ciples of the Turkish nation and religion 
should prevail, the home in which my 
neighbor lives would be destroyed. That 
is to say there would be no Christian 
homes. Does this young man wish to 
establish a Turkish civilization here in 
our country? 1 If not, why should he 
wear about the streets this badge of the 
Turkish nation, this representation of 
the Turkish sword? I do not suppose 
he knows what either part of that badge 
which he wears on his coat signifies. I 
think well enough of him as a man to 
believe that if he did he would put it in 
the stove rather than on his coat. I 
think that all lodge men ought to re- 
member that many of those whom they 



12 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



pass in the streets are more intelligent 
about the organizations than they them- 
selves are. 

A man who wears the square and com- 
pass ought to remember that it reminds 
his neighbors and friends of the way he 
was undressed when he took his degrees 
and of his oaths and penalties which he 
assumed. A man who wears the symbol 
of the seventh degree ought to under- 
stand that it signifies to intelligent per- 
sons the shameful ceremonies of the 
chapter and the penalty of having the top 
of his skull smitten off and his brains ex- 
posed to the scorching rays of the noon- 
day sun. A man who puts on the Knights 
Templar's badge and w r ears it about the 
streets should understand that it reminds 
all students of the system of the fifth 
libation ; the human skull out of which 
he drank pure wine while he prayed God 
to doubly damn his soul should he prove 
untrue to his Knights Templar obliga- 
tions. And if these neighbors of ours 
do not enjoy thinking about such things 
as these and knowing that other people 
think about them, they ought not to put 
on these badges which they wear. 
A Safeguard. 

It may be said that these badges are 
a safeguard to the community, that they 
warn persons not connected with these 
organizations of the obligations which 
those who wear the badges have as- 
sumed. This is undoubtedly true but it 
would seem to be an argument, not for 
wearing the badges, but for leaving the 
orders. Since the obligations are what 
they are, since the history of the organ- 
izations is what it is, since the religious 
character of the organizations is the 
pagan, unclean thing that it has come to 
be, ought not all good citizens and all 
good church men to burn their badges 
and to abandon the organizations with 
which they have been connected? We 
are thankful to say that thousands of 
them are so doing. We scarcely ever go 



abroad and meet with half a dozen men 
but that we find some one who has aban- 
doned his secret society for the sake of 
Christ and the church. We thank God 
that it is so and we pray that this ten- 
dency may continue more and more. 
Faithfully yours, 

Charles A. Blanch ard. 



BLACK HAND AND BLACK LIST. 

BY REV. ALEXANDER THOMSON. 

It is a very common thing these days 
to see a headline like the following in 
the daily press : "A Mysterious Murder, 
Supposed to Be the Work of the Black 
Hand." These tragedies are taking 
place in all our great cities, and few are 
the cases where the criminal is discov- 
ered and punished. The terror of the 
organization rests upon the Italians, so 
that in the main they do not dare reveal 
what they know. Nor is it easy to resist 
the conclusion that our detectives have 
little relish to dive very deep into these 
mysteries. They are dangerous. The 
Black Hand comes out of the darkness, 
deals its deadly blows, and disappears. 

The Black List, in its own way, is 
scarcely less dangerous ; and, when we 
reflect how wide has been the range of 
its activities, we see how great must be 
the sum of its evil. A man becomes the 
leader of his fellows in some contest for 
their rights. He is a marked man, and 
is placed on the Black List. Discharged 
as soon as it is safe to do so, he seeks 
employment at his chosen work else- 
where, we will say on the railroad, or in 
the railroad shop. No, he is not wanted. 
He travels the country over. There is 
no work for him in that line. He is an 
honest, capable man. and in the prime of 
life, but he is on the Black List. 

The question I wish now to consider 
is this: Have we in the secret orders. 
and especially in the father of them all 
in this country, Masonry, a "black hand" 
that strikes down, and a "black list" that 
prevents rising? The rights of free, 
speech and free press are among the in- 
alienable rights of American citizens. 
So long as a man tells the truth, slanders 
nobody, and says nothing that can be 
construed into treason, he is free to speak 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13 



his mind. Limit this, and a deadly blow- 
has been dealt to all rational freedom 
and progress. Have we these rights to- 
day ? Let a man be known as opposed 
to secret societies, let him be kindly in 
his nature, and careful and truthful in 
his speech ; will this man find that he 
has on the platform, in the pulpit, and 
in the press, freedom to discuss the lodge 
question without danger to his own per- 
sonal interests ? Let any man make the 
attempt honestly, and he will not be long 
without a clear understanding on this 
question. I am convinced that the man 
who is known to be opposed to the Lodge 
System in our day. swims with a stone 
about his neck, ancb that often a "black 
hand-" is reached out of the darkness to 
strike him down without his knowing 
where the blow came from, or how it 
was dealt. 

A minister of my own denomination 
said to another when he learned that I 
was opposed to the Lodge System, 
"Sure-ly he must know what that means. 
Air. Thomson cannot be ignorant of the 
power of the Lodge." I am not ignorant. 
In my own case, having been in my 
younger days a member of the Sons of 
Temperance, the Good Templars, and 
the Union League during war times, I 
have always clearly recognized the fact 
of the blinding pow T er of the Lodge. I 
was as honest when I was a member of 
these lodges as I am to-day, when op- 
posed to them, and, therefore, have 
sought carefully and kindly to make men 
see the wrong- foundation upon which all 
secret societies rest. The Lodge has 
been the one force upon whose opposi- 
tion I could count during my whole min- 
istry. How often the "black hand" has 
been reached out of the darkness to 
strike me. I will never know. I have al- 
ways been* known as a man's preacher. 
The men have taken kindly to me always, 
except where this barrier of the Lodge 
has" intervened. Xor have I ever been 
ignorant of what I could not well help 
knowing, that union with the- Lodge 
would make the path of this life easier 
to me. 

Let a minister in any of our great 
denominations, which have no testimony 
against the Lodge, be known as opposed 
to the Secret Empire. Will it affect his 
standing in his own denomination? Will 



it help or hinder him in securing a new 
charge or retaining an old one? When 
attending one of our Congregational as- 
sociations in Illinois. I went with three 
other brethren to visit an Odd Fellows' 
Old People's Home. Two of these breth- 
ren were lodge men. One said to the 
other, "Well, it would be no use for any 
minister to seek a church in this town if 
he were not a lodge man. It is too bad 
that it is so, but it is." One of the min- 
isters knew my views on the subject. 
The man who spoke, did not. I suppose 
that at this time my friend pinched him, 
for there was a great silence. 

Now, I do not for one moment find 
fault with the Lodge for defending it- 
self. The law of self-preservation de- 
mands this. If the Lodge could show 7 
its moral right to exist, in the light of 
Christian truth, very great would be my 
relief ; no man in the possession of a 
sound mind will lead a forlorn hope un- 
less there is a stern necessity for that 
work. There is never any real open de- 
fense, however, but nearly always the 
blow of the "black hand" reached out of 
the darkness. There was once this sig- 
nificant phrase among the Masons. They 
spoke of putting a "black shirt" upon a 
man. None will deny their power, and 
few will deny the will of the regular 
lodge man. Here the deadly lodge 
"black list" comes in, and before it. 
merit, spirituality, and kindness go as 
nothing. How deadly this "black list" 
is. only the future will reveal. 

But this "black hand" is capable of be- 
ing a helping hand as well, and a very 
powerful hand. I was once standing- 
conversing with a man who had just 
been elected to a very important office 
in the State. A man came up and ad- 
dressed the gentleman about as follows : 
"They wanted me to turn you down, but 
I was not going back upon a member of 
my Lodge." I know a minister who 
came to the town I lived in. as a candi- 
date for the Congregational church. He 
was a member of nearly all the lodges, 
and especially was he a high Mason. He 
gave the grip right and left, secured the 
church, took the town by storm', filled 
the church to overflowing, and nearly 
emptied it in two years. Such is the 
hand of the lodge to-day : a "black hand" 
to its opponents, but a white, helping 



14 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



hand to its friends. God's great love of 
merit, God's great love of justice, are 
set aside, and in nearly all walks of life, 
the Lodge is omnipotent. 

I knew a young minister who came 
to a certain town with his eyes wide 
open on the lodge question, and who 
bore witness against it, but his Presiding 
Elder was a Mason. He found that his 



way upward would be barred to him. He 
saw that the Masonic ladder was a sure 
and safe one to rise by, and so he left 
that town a Mason. 

With the "black hand" and the "black 
list" of the Lodge against him, the min- 
ister who is opposed to the Lodge to- 
day, can only endure "as seeing Him 
who is invisible." 



,* 




*£ 



From the personal reminiscences by Samuel D. Greene of the abduction and mur- 
der of Captain William Morgan were taken some of the facts so vividly brought out in 
Miss Flagg^s "Power of the Secret Empire," which ended in the December number of 
the CYNOSURE. The story has created so wide an interest that we propose to give our 
readers in the next few months some of these facts as recorded by Mr. Greene, an eye- 
witness. — Editor. 



CHAPTER V. 

Abduction of Morgan Continued. 

Affidavit of the Jailer's Wife. 

But what was actually passing at Can- 
andaigua, just before Mrs. Morgan was 
there, waiting for Mr. Kietchum to try 
and find her husband, is made thrilling- 
lv clear by the following affidavit of Mrs. 
Mary W. Hall, wife of the jailer at 
Canandaigua. 

The testimony is long, and we need 
not give the whole of it. It goes on to 
recite that on Tuesday, the 12th day 
of September, she and her husband re- 
turned to their home — which was in the 
jail, — after a short absence ; that at even- 
ing of that day her husband went out 
from the jail, and soon after a man, call- 
ing himself Mr. Lawson, called and in- 
quired for Mr. Hall, the jailer, and, find- 
ing that he was not at home, requested 
permission to speak with Mr. Morgan, 
then confined in the jail. She told him 
this was against the rules of the prison, 
and that he could say nothing to Mr. 
Morgan except what she should be per- 
mitted to hear. 

Mr. Lawson talked through the grate 
of the door, and represented himself as 
a friend who had come to settle the 
claim against him and take him out from 
jail. Mr. Morgan apparently believed 
the story, and was willing to go. Mr. 
Hall, however, the jailer, could not be 



found, and Mrs. Hall was not willing to 
take the money and discharge the pris- 
oner. Lawson then inquired if she would 
do so in case Colonel Sawyer, of Canan- 
daigua, should say it was right and prop- 
er. She refused. Lawson then went 
away, and soon after returned with 
Colonel Sawyer. They were quite in- 
dignant that she would not let Mr. Mor- 
gan go free, when- they were willing to 
settle the claim against him ; they said 
this claim had been assigned to one 
Chesebro, and they proposed to go and 
find Chesebro. After a little time they 
came back with Chesebro, and he also 
urged the liberation of Morgan, all on 
the ground of friendship for him. There 
had also been at the prison during the 
evening, along with these men, a man by 
the name of Foster. The rest of the 
storv we will give in the words of Mrs. 
Hall, deposed before Jeffrey Chipman, 
Justice of the Peace of Ontario County. 
They had finally prevailed upon Mrs. 
Hall to receive the money and let the 
prisoner go free, although she had been 
over-persuaded to this course, and felt 
that it was an irregular proceeding. 

This deponent took the keys, and was 
going to liberate Morgan; that Lawson 
spoke to this deponent, and said, "Wait 
and I will go with you;" that Lawson then 
stepped to the door and whistled, and then 
followed this deponent; that when they 
came to the outer door of the prison, Law- 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



15 



son said to this deponent, "You need not 
fasten this door after us;" but this depon- 
ent said she should, for there were other 
prisoners in the room; that this deponent 
and Lawson went into the hall adjoining 
the room where Morgan was, and Lawson 
spoke in a low voice to Morgan through 
the grates, "Get yourself ready to go with 
me — dress yourself quick;" that Morgan 
was soon ready, and this deponent let him 
out, and Lawson took Morgan by the arm. 
and went out of the prison to the outer 
door; that while this deponent was fasten- 
ing the prison door, she heard at, or near, 
the outer door of the jail, a most dis- 
tressing cry of murder; that this deponent 
ran to the door, and saw Lawson and the 
man that he called Foster, one on each 
side of Morgan, having hold of Morgan's 
arms; that Tdorgan continued to scream or 
cry 'in a most distressing manner, at the 
same time struggling with all his strength, 
apparently, to get loose from Lawson and 
Foster; that the cry of Morgan continued 
until his voice appeared to be suppressed 
by something put over his mouth: that 
during the time that Morgan was strug- 
gling, and crying murder, the said Colonel 
Sawyer and the said Chesebro were stand- 
ing a short distance from the jail door. 
near the well, and in full view and hear- 
ing of all that passed, but offered no assist- 
ance to Morgan, nor did they attempt to 
release him from Lawson and Foster; but 
one of them struck with a stick a violent 
blow upon the well-curb or a tub standing 
near; that soon after this deponent saw a 
carriage pass the jail in the direction that 
Lawson and Foster took Morgan; that the 
evening was quite light in consequence of 
its being about the full of the moon; that 
she. this deponent, could distinguish from 
the jail door the horses in the carriage 
which passed to be gray; that the deponent 
supposed the striking upon the well-curb 
or tub by Chesebro or Colonel Sawyer was 
a signal for the carriage to come, as it 
came immediately after; that when the 
carriage passed. Lawson and Foster could 
not have got but a few rods with Morgan; 
that immediately after the striking upon the 
well-curb or tub Colonel Sawyer, and as 
.this deoonent thinks, Chesebro also, passed 
the jail door in the direction that Lawson 
and Foster, took Morgan, but not appar- 
ently to render Morgan any assistance to- 
wards being released from Lawson and 
Foster; but Colonel Sawyer, however, 
pic'ked up Morgan's hat. which had fallen 
off in the struggle; that when Morgan was 
taken from the jail it was about nine 
o'clock in the evening, or a little past: that 
this deponent has since been informed that 
Lawson lives about two or three miles from 
the jail; that this deponent has never seen 
Morgan since he was taken from the jail 
as aforesaid, and knows nothing about 
where he was taken to, or where he now is. 

This testimony was sworn to by Mrs. 
Hall before the Justice of the Peace, on 



the twenty-third day of September, 
eleven days after the transactions took 
place. This was the kind of news which 
the messenger dispatched from Batavia 
brought back to Mrs. Morgan and her 
friends. 

It will be observed, by noticing the 
correspondences of time, that Mrs. Mor- 
gan reached Canandaigua the day after 
her husband was taken out of jail in the 
manner just described. She had been 
made to believe that Air. Morgan had 
been taken to parts unknown. She had 
been in the keeping of Masons, who told 
her what stories they pleased. A woman 
with a young child, she could not well go 
out into the streets of the village and 
gather information for herself, nor did 
the people, who were not Masons, know 
what was going on. 

YYe have now the events that followed 
the abduction of Morgan, while we go 
back again to Batavia, to take a new 
starting-point, and follow out another 
series of events which transpired close 
alongside of those narrated in this 
chapter. 

CHAPTER VI. 



Attempted Abduction of Miller and His 
Rescue. 

In the afternoon of Monday, Septem- 
ber ii, the same clay on which Air. Mor- 
gan had been forced away from Batavia. 
I suddenly received a summons from the 
lodge to go to Le Roy. a village distant 
some ten miles from Batavia. It was 
stated that there was to be held there an 
important Masonic meeting, several 
lodges coming together, to see what fur- 
ther steps should be taken to suppress 
the publication of the book, and to con- 
sider what should be done with Morgan 
and Miller. I refused to obey this sum- 
mons. Then the use of my horses and 
carriages was asked to convey thither 
the Masons who desired to attend. This 
also I refused. I did not intend. that my 
own hands or my property should have 
anything to do in furthering the wicked 
designs then on foot. 

The meeting wa s held, however, at Le 
Roy. many of the Masons going from 
our village. The next morning" notice 
was sent me that I must appear at the 
east end of the village, under the brow 



16 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



of the hill, precisely at twelve o'clock; 
that the Masons were to rally there in a 
bod)" ; march in their strength at one 
o'clock, and in open day destroy Miller's 
printing' offices, scatter his type, secure 
his person, and the manuscripts and 
printed sheets to be found in his office. 
It was said, for my encouragement, that 
strangers from abroad would take the 
fore front in the attack and destruction 
of property — men who could not be 
easily identified, if any stir should be 
made about the matter. The man who 
came to notify me requested me to be 
particular to have the bell rung at twelve 
o'clock that day (the key of the church 
being kept at my house ) , so that those 
lying in ambush or lurking about the 
village, might have the signal for gather- 
ing at the rallying-place. I was requested 
to see the bell-ringer that morning by 
nine o'clock, so as to be sure and have 
this matter attended to. They wanted 
to gather at twelve o'clock, so that they 
might organize and be ready to march 
into the village promptly at one. 

The plan was, as I w T as informed, that 
Miller, when taken, should be carried at 
once to Stafford, to the lodge-room, kept- 
there till night, then taken down to the 
"ridge road," as it was called, running 
from Canandaigua west towards Buffalo, 
passing some miles north of Batavia, and 
there be kept ready to join Morgan as 
he should be conveyed away from Can- 
andaigua towards Canada. 

The information which I thus received 
I communicated at once to Mr. Harris, 
and he forthwith apprised Mr. Miller of 
what was going forward, and of the im- 
minent dangers awaiting him. He at 
once went into his office and prepared a 
handbill, containing these general facts, 
which he threw out of the window as 
soon as they were struck off, to arouse 
the people of the village. He purposed 
also to send them out into the country 
to call in his friends, and gain their as- 
sistance in this crisis. But the people of 
Batavia who were not Masons, would 
not believe the story ; said it was prepos- 
terous to suppose that a band of men 
should come in there in open daylight to 
do such work as this. They thought Mr. 
Miller was in a state of needless panic, 
and they dissuaded him from distribut- 
ing his handbill. About this time I went 



up the street to hear what was said about 
the situation. No one suspected me as 
being the author of all this excitement, 
and the people told me that the man who 
circulated such stories was a fool ; that 
they were not for a moment to be 
credited.. 

This was only one day, it will be re- 
membered, after Morgan had been ar- 
rested and taken out of the place ; but, 
as has been already said, the people did 
not, at that time, understand the real 
transaction concerning Morgan. They 
thought he had been taken on an honest 
warrant and carried away for examina- 
tion. They did not know that it was 
wholly a plan and plot of the Masons to 
take him. Their minds, therefore, were 
not prepared to trust this story which 
Harris had communicated to Mr. Miller, 
and he to the people, which came from 
me. When this outside excitement died 
away, Miller felt that he was in the 
greater danger, as he really was. In 
passing along the street I saw that Miller 
did not dare to come out of his office. 
Harris also was frightened at the turn 
things were taking, and he, too, had gone 
into his office and locked himself in. 

My own situation, too, was becoming 
very critical, and I felt it to be so. If 
by the public commotion which had been 
made the Masons should again conclude 
to retire and not make the attack at that 
time, nothing would be more natural 
than that Mr. Harris should think I was 
making false and exciting reports. As 
a reaction from his fear, and through the 
chagrin of seeming to give unreal infor- 
mation, he might seek to exonerate him- 
self and lay the burden upon me, in 
which case the Masonic rage would turn 
against me more violently, if possible, 
than against Morgan and Miller. 

Things w r ere coming to such close 
quarters that I concluded to go home at 
once and make a confidant of my wife. 
Up to this time she had known nothing 
of what I was doing. I went to my 
house, asked my wife to step to a cham- 
ber window which looked out on Miller's 
office. Then I related to her what I sup- 
posed Avas about to take place, and told 
her my whole position and agency in the 
matter. I told her frankly that I had 
disregarded my Masonic oaths, and that 
my relations to the Masons were, conse- 



Mav, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



17 



quently, very curious and delicate, and if 
in any way they should discover what I 
had done, my life would be in danger. 
Little as she liked Masonry, and much 
as she had ridiculed its nonsensical forms 
a few months before, she novo thought I 
had done wrong in breaking my Masonic 
oaths, that my conscience was troubled 
because of this, and that I was half be- 
side myself. She asked me, with a look 
of incredulity, if I supposed Masons 
would come into the village of Batavia 
in open daylight, and destroy prop- 
erty. I told her I did believe it, just that, 
and if she would stay where she was, 
she 'would probably soon see the thing 
done. I told her, moreover, as she valued 
my life, to make no mention of my name 
in connection with these things ; but if I 
should be missing, and could not be ac- 
counted for, then "that she should pub- 
lish to the world what I had said to her. 

Hardly had I told her this, when I 
saw a Mason coming to my door — a Mr. 
Merrill. He called upon me, and said, 
"Greene, you must be ready to turn out, 
the Masons are coming down. If you 
know anything you must know nothing. 
You can swear one way as well as an- 
other. [This was a principle agreed up- 
on and sanctioned by act of the lodge.] 
They are coming, you must be ready to 
help." He then started to go; but when 
a few steps from the door he turned 
back, and said, "There is some traitor in 
the camp, and we will find him out yet. 
He shall have his house burnt over his 
head, and his throat cut from ear to ear." 

He then left me, and ran towards Mr. 
Miller's office. Immediately the crowd 
of Masons began to gather, armed with 
hoop-poles. They had taken a parcel of 
'these poles and sawed them in two, mak- 
ing convenient clubs. The men rushed 
up stairs, burst open the door of Miller's 
office, seized him and Captain Davids 
also, on warrants, dragged them down 
stairs and out into the street, their hats 
flying one way and their heads twitching 
the other. I heard Miller cry out, "Trea^ 
me fair ! treat me fair ! and I will go with 
you." 

The warrant on which Miller was ar- 
rested was made out at Le Roy, on the 
oath of Daniel Johns, the spy before 
spoken of, by Justice Barton, a Mason. 

My wife stood at the window spell- 



bound, looking upon these operations, 
until she saw Miller dragged into the 
street, when she grew frightened and 
came to look after me. She had come 
to the conclusion that I was not so much 
beside myself as she supposed, and that 
there was real cause for alarm. 

It was well understood that about three 
hundred Masons were in and about Ba- 
tavia, banded together for this business. 
But after the information got out, only 
about one hundred and fifty of these 
men made their appearance in the village 
at the time of the onset, and of these, 
only about forty actually came up to 
make the attack on Miller's office. 

As soon as Miller was taken he was 
hurried off with all despatch to Danold's 
tavern, the same place where Morgan 
was taken, and as soon as the necessary 
preparations could be made he was start- 
ed off in a wagon towards Stafford, with 
a motley assemblage accompanying, some 
in wagons, some on horseback, and some 
on foot. I at once requested Mr. Harris 
to employ Air. Talbot, a lawyer, to make 
use of all possible forms of law for his 
recovery. He consented, and undertook 
the case, preparing to follow the fugi- 
tives who were bearing away the pris- 
oner. I was surprised that others of the 
villagers did not volunteer to go along 
with him and assist him. I sought an 
opportunity, therefore, to have an inter- 
view again with Harris. I passed his 
office, and snipped a piece of paper into 
it, which said, "Follow me." I then 
passed around some buildings, and went 
into an avenue between my house and 
a brick store, where I stepped into my 
kitchen, and threw up a window looking 
into this passage-way. Mr. Harris came 
into the avenue, out of sight of the street. 
and underneath the window. I told him 
that something must be done immediate- 
ly ; that the whole community seemed to 
be paralyzed; that the Masons, by their 
talk, had so raised the prejudices of peo- 
ple against Morgan and Miller, that they 
could do almost anything with them with 
impunity. I told him T thought it was 
our duty to do all in our power to rescue 
Miller, and that the community must, in 
some way, be aroused. I advised him 
to go and tell Mrs. A Tiller to sound the 
alarm — to go up Genesee street, and 
down Park street, and crv. "Murder!" 



18 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



and when she was questioned as to her 
reason for so doing, she should declare 
that Morgan was taken off yesterday, 
and her husband to-day, and unless they 
were pursued and rescued, they would 
certainly be murdered. I did not con- 
sider this a false alarm by any means, 
and I advised Harris to make Mrs. Miller 
believe that it was really true, so that she 
should cry in earnest. 

Mrs. Miller caught the spirit of the 
occasion, and throwing a shawl over her 
head, she ran out into the street on her 
errand. The first man she met was a 
Mr. Cochrane. He questioned her about 
the matter, and she imparted to him her 
own fears, and roused in him a thorough 
excitement. He told her to go back into 
the house and he would do the business. 
Mr. Cochrane ran immediatelv and hired 
stages and wagons, all the while scatter- 
ing the information abroad, and soon 
about one hundred men were gathered 
together, ready to start upon the pursuit. 

They overtook the company having 
Miller in charge at Stafford, six miles 
from Batavia. They had made a pause 
there, and he had been placed for safe 
keeping in the lodge-room, and was 
guarded by what is called, in Masonic 
parlance, the Tyler's Sword. Mr. Tal- 
bot, the lawyer, demanded entrance, on 
the ground that Miller was his client, 
and the law allowed him to have inter- 
course with his client. This privilege was 
refused by the Tyler ; but Air. Talbot 
entered, and was followed by some of 
his neighbors and friends who had come 
on from Batavia. They found Mr. Dan- 
iel Johns, the spy, the pompous champion 
of Masonry, cutting a high figure. He 
was brandishing a sword over Air. Mil- 
ler's head, and. telling him that he was 
not to be tried by any earthly tribunal, 
but was going where Morgan was. See- 
ing the state of things, Air. Talbot 
stepped up to Miller, and said to him, 
"This is no court of justice : you must 
go on to Le Roy, where the warrant was 
issued." Then taking him by the arm, 
Mr. Talbot led the way, and, followed 
by his friends, went down into the street, 
to go on to Le Row Here the Masons 
rallied and took Miller out of the hands 
of Talbot, and put him on board a wagon 
and started again as if for Le Roy. 

It was manifest that the Masons de- 



sired to consume the time until night in 
the vicinity of Stafford. They really had 
no intention of going on to Le Roy with 
their prisoner at all. Though the war- 
rant was issued there, and Justice Bar- 
ton was resident there, it was obvious 
that they were resorting to all sorts of 
shifts and evasions jto use up the after- 
noon, and not go to Le Roy. But the 
cue of Air. Talbot and his party was. 
that Air. Miller must go at once to Le 
Roy. And under this pressure, which 
could not very well be resisted, both be- 
cause of its reasonableness and because 
of the numbers supporting it, the noisy 
assemblage moved on in a somewhat mis- 
cellaneous way towards Le Roy, Air. 
Aliller sometimes seeming to be in the 
keeping of the one party, and sometimes 
of the other. 

The}' reached Le Roy about nightfall, 
and after a long time spent in the same 
evasive policy. Air. Talbot and his friends 
finally succeeded in getting Aliller into 
the presence of Justice Barton. It was 
evident that there had been no expecta- 
tion of any such proceeding. The con- 
stable and warrant were called for, but 
no constable, or warrant, or plaintiff 
made their appearance; so that the jus- 
tice was compelled to tell Air. Aliller he 
was discharged, and was at liberty to 
go where he pleased. 

It may be remembered that Captain 
Davids was arrested at the same time 
with Air. Aliller. The warrant for the 
arrest of both was issued on the oath 
and at the request of this Daniel Johns, 
the spy, who had left Miller's office only 
the Saturday before, taking with him a 
manuscript belonging to the office. The 
person serving this warrant was [esse 
French, one of the constables of the 
county. He arrested both Aliller and 
Davids, as has been stated. But Davids 
happened to be on the jail limits of Ba- 
tavia. and the sheriff of the county in- 
formed the crowd who had the two men 
in charge that Davids was in his custody, 
and could not be taken out of the place. 

As soon as Aliller was discharged, he. 
followed by his friends, was making his 
way towards a public house, when the 
constable French appeared again, and 
attempted to re-arrest him on the same 
warrant. Johns was present, and the 
two, French and Johns, called lustily on 



V-Y 



CHRISTIAN" IV: : SURE. 



IS 



the bystanders to come forward and help 
aires: the prisoner, who had been taken 
out of their hands. A rush was made, 
and Miller was again re-taken, and in the 
midst of a large crowd of Masons, was 
borne into the tavern. His pursuers then 
began to think the time serious. It had 
come to be a question, no longer of law. 
but of which part)" was strongest, 
rane and his men then brought a stage 
up to the door of the tavern, with the 
driver upon the seat and the stage-door 



£ tutorial. 



There may be a few changes bul 
program for the annual meeting will be 
substanr: 1II3 is printed in this number. 



I: := - 
ers r 1 



i.-.e.:^':: : > e 01 

nd then rushing jesus Christ n : Lore The :hr:rch is 

-".-hall, thev opened to the right and separate from :he v.-orli: rhe i:*ige is 

left.:: heer :he r assa^e-.vay hear, whiie :j the ■ - h- i The .':::-':. reaches 

■ithers =u i cer.'.y : '-: Vih.er :rrt : :he _hrisriar. nr.rais: :'.- . I i^e. ir. i - . 

hands of his enemies, and bore him to- practice bets and violates those 

war is i s: r hiis :r:c::is i::-:a:rriy ::r.r.-_i- - : light and 

rlosed up behind, and in a moment he proclaims truth from the 

the stage., ind n his way h me I Ige - ers silently in dark] -- rhe 

At a late hour : the night he was tell h: : the :hurch is v.ith rhe 

brought back to Batan tc the great re- Father and the Son, him that 

lief 3f Jiis wife believeth; the fellowshi] >f the I ige is 

- : ethe v any. rhrou^h :rr secrer with in infi lei what part hath 

: .. - - : ~^;~h~ --.- - -~ -._ are aivr^arhu' rhe resi-rr of the i 

m ^r t - T h ai . • • • . • ii church to the Ige, :r:av rrr. ^rrair. 

ment. 1 wa? m .. . - . _ . .--. ... 

«_ u "- . • •_ wis::::: ::: rrr ::. .e :•: r::e rararious 

:r:::e :::::..::. : .:.c ^a_ — _ _ . _ ^ . 

ting with every little knot - "'" 

.V h :.:7Thh-h .. : hh l .. ._._". _■ :ii rir. i rhe ierr^r ::: rhis ::::::: . 

■ ./ hi '.'•'.""' -T.ih .7 ... 777.- 77 "-; front ii T an en: imaging .:. 

. • _ : . .- 77 7 •. .. . :.__ - "-".' n<er ::: : : ::r:nrn e are 

v.-her: ^ erires : s: me of the 

I letters already r 
: the -■ • ' ■ a nd whicl 



tinsr Miller. 7 



...... g 

1 - 



Annua 



srarr rrr .:: r.rer - sse :o: r. 

at night. Bur a little 
l*-. -»l_- a r "\ r."* - — v« 

:::; rrre .: re \:tz ". 7: : s: g 
o brought him 5 in- 

: >: ." - ■ . .- :: i rire re:: 
a Le Roy tc Batav 
te much 

tied. 1 

IMPORTANT 
istees i the 2d 'nit 

■Jth Si Par- 

Eng] . hicag have of- 

church to the X 

g I y 2 : ' and 2j.th 
s having arisen making it :m- 
use the Xazarene churcl 



SECRET SOCIETIES A PEST. 

Y\ e hav 1 >u -he 

■"-.- ::: 1 of a teachers 

iaiiv ver zzee 

atter led the 

?nt a i iress - oe : whi 7 
by Dr. Ste] iren A. Wis 
° g in XV 
: a : - ir . 

is his sul je : and he 

training g - 5 bred 

in thr Is for insisting 

civic right - Is in [ e - 

- -hould ai 

thought and a A mena t 

mocracy in our pubi 
Greek let:. 
foolishly pern 

schools liege si 



20 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



tng the subject assigned for an essay, 
which was "The Test of Learning," 
wrote on "The Pest of Learning." The 
high school Greek letter fraternity is the 
pest of learning. When we become alive 
to the menace of them, and sensible of 
our own power, the fraternities will soon 
pass out of high schools. Lmfraternal in 
essence, they are yet Greek in magnify- 
ing the arts of pleasure, a service hardly 
needed amid the hyper -Hellenistic ten- 
dencies of our age. 



The friends have been very kind in 
sending in the January number of the 
Cynosure, and w 7 e take this opportunity 
to thank them for it, and also to advise 
any of our regular subscribers who did 
not receive their January number to 
write at once for a copy. 



HE HELPED INITIATE. 

The corner of One Hundred and 
Twenty-Eighth Street and Seventh Ave- 
nue. N. Y.j is understood to be infested 
with what are called "mashers," one of 
whom, thinking he was speaking to a 
woman, accosted her with "O, you kid." 
Instantly he was himself mashed by a 
blow like the kick of a pair of mules. A 
crowd gathered, and a policeman is said 
to have offered assistance to the woman, 
who seemed to need it less than the 
crumpled aggressor. 

Just then a small but old boy re- 
marked, "That heavy hitting skirt is a 
man." 

Correct. With a yell, the skirt wearer 
struck a pace down the street correspond- 
ing to his masculine blow. The novel 
handicap no doubt accounted for his fall, 
and his fall facilitated his capture by the 
policeman, who helped him after all, 
but toward a police station. A lare;e 
crowd provided an impromptu escort. 
Tt appears that he had a companion, 
against whom no charge was made, 
though he came to the station. The cap- 
tured one was charged with disorderly 
conduct. He was a seventeen -vear-old 
boy, and his companion said they both 
were being initiated into the Ancient and 
Mysterious Order of the Apaches of 
the Bronx. Breaking municipal law is a 
good beginning. 



THE MYSTERIOUS SENUSSI. 

An article written by Edgar L. Yin- 
cent and published in Young People, dis- 
cusses the case of Tripoli under the cap- 
tion "Cross or Crescent." It says in 
part: 

On the other hand, what about the ability of 
the Turk to retain his grasp on Tripoli? The 
Moslem world comprises more than two hun- 
dred and twenty million adherents. Will they 
all stand firm for the integrity of the empire?' 
Besides, there is that mysterious brotherhood 
of the Senussi, which is said to include any- 
where from five to fifteen millions of mem- 
bers, initiated to the organization by rites of 
which the world knows little or nothing. With 
its headquarters away down at Jof in the oasis 
of Kufra, live hundred miles south of the 
nearest seaport town, this brotherhood has 
been for years collecting stores of war mate- 
rials and drilling men in the art of war. 
Young men, educated at the expense of the 
brotherhood in the best schools of the conti- 
nent, go back to Jof to direct factories for 
the manufacture of arms and ammunition. 

W'hat will the Senussi do in this crisis ? 
Some students of world history believe they 
will stand firm for the government of* Turkey. 
Others hold that the organization has already 
made overtures to Italy. 

It might interest a student of such 
things to inquire how many of this mys- 
terious brotherhood are also Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. The modern, like the 
earlier, Oriental is a joiner. 



IT ALTERS THE CASE. 

What a difference it makes when an 
oath is taken by a disreputable conclave. 
The same kind of oath, taken in an ele- 
gantly furnished room, in the presence of 
politicians and their associates, becomes 
part of the ritual of a noble order claim- 
ing to be moral or even religious. But 
this similar oath, being that of Night 
Riders, is undeniably dreadful, and such 
things should not be allowed. 

You do solemnly swear, in the presence of 
Almighty God and these witnesses, that you 
desire to become a night rider; that you will' 
not write, talk or tell to any one of the secrets 
of this order of night riders; that if you do 
talk, write or tell to any person any of the 
secrets of the order, we are nermitted to do 
with you as we see fit. You know death, hell 
and destruction will be your portion, and that 
your body will not be buried in a graveyard. 
Do you willingly and freely submit to all this„ 
so help you God ? 



N. C. A. annual meeting May 23d,. 
24th, in 2d Lhiited Presbyterian church, 
cor. 65th St. and Parnell Ave.. Engle- 
wood, Chicago. 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



21 



Hems of ©ur Porft. 



We were glad to receive a letter early 
in the month from Elder A. B. Lipp, 
written from Stahl, Missouri. He and 
brother J. T. Cullor, have been making 
an auto tour through the states of Mis- 
souri, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kansas and 
Tennessee, giving addresses wherever 
possible on antisecrecy, and meeting with 
much success and encouragement. One 
of the most encouraging things about the 
trip was the fact that they met twenty - 
five different ministers who were "firmly 
set against Lodgery of all kinds, and 
who are working vigorously against it in 
their parishes." 



Preliminary to the holding of the X. 
C. A. annual meeting, letters were sent 
out to a dozen different Bible Schools 
and Theological Seminaries of this city, 
offering to furnish a speaker on the re- 
lation of the Lodge to the Church and to 
Christian life. Replies were received, 
from most of those written to. Last 
month four such meetings were held. 
The writer was present at the Lutheran 
Theological Seminary, and has never 
heard a more eloquent presentation 
of this matter, or one that seemed to him 
more important for theological students 
to hear. Mr. E. Y. YYoolley gave the 
address before the Chicago Theological 
Seminary (Congregational) ; Rev. J. G. 
Brooks and Mr. Julius Haavind ad- 
dressed the Bethany Bible School 
( Church of the Brethren) ; and Presi- 
dent Blanchard spoke to the students 
of the Chicago Evangelist Institute. 
We print herein communication from 
two of the officers of these schools 
which express their appreciation of the 
effort. 



Chicago, 111., April 3, 1912. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips, National Christian 

Association. 

Dear Brother Phillips: We have had 
it in mind to write you regarding the 
Anti-Secrecy meeting which was held 
here at our school under your direction 
on last Thursday evening, March 28. 

The meeting was certainly an excel- 
lent one, and was highly appreciated by 
all of those in attendance. It brought 



out a phase of the work in the Anti- 
secrecy cau>e that is seldom brought 
out, especially as it was here. Our stu- 
dents need to be kept awake along this 
line, not so much through any probability 
of their joining the lodge, but in order 
that they may be prepared to keep others 
from entering into something that they 
will afterwards regret. 

We shall certainly be open to meetings 
of this kind every year. We wish you 
abundant grace in the work you are do- 
ing for the peace and prosperity of the 
home, the church and the nation, and 
with our very best wishes, we are, 
Fraternally, 
Bethany Bible School, 
lames M. Moore, Sec. 



Chicago, 111., March 28. 1912. 
My Dear Mr. Phillips : 

I wish to express to you our thanks for 
the most estimable addresses that have 
been delivered for several years by Dr. 
Blanchard of Wheaton College before 
the student body of our Seminarv on 
some of the evils connected with secret 
societies. These addresses have been 
very Scriptural and edifying and have 
helped our young men largely in estab- 
lishing themselves in the faith for their 
future work for the ministry. Xo one 
has been more welcome than Dr. Blan- 
chard, and I hope he will have the priv- 
ilege of presenting the cause before many 
theological seminaries. 

Sincerely yours. 

R. F. Weidner. 
President the Theological Seminary- 
Evangelical Lutheran Church. 



PENNSYLVANIA REPORT. 

The Pennsylvania State Convention 
of the National Christian Association 
met in the Free Methodist church. Ta- 
rentum. Pa., March 18. 1912, at 2 p. m. 

The devotional exercises were con- 
ducted by the Rev. D. W. Rose, Bird- 
ville. In the absence of the President 
and Vice-President, Mr. Rose presided. 
On motion. Rev. R. B. Campbell. Blairs- 
ville. was elected Secretary pro tern. 
Rev. C. F. Johnston, pastor of the Ta- 
rentum Free Methodist Church, made 
the address of welcome. In the absence 
of Rev. D. M. Landis, Rev. W. B. Stod- 
dard. Washington, D. C, responded. 



_'■_' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



Rev. A. S. Dornheim, Beaver Falls, ad- 
dressed the Convention on the subject, 
"Getting Light." 

The following committees were ap- 
pointed : On Nominations, Rev. D. W. 
Rose, Birdville; Rev. M. M. Pierce, E. 
E. Pittsburgh ; Rev. Dr. W. J. Coleman, 
Pittsburgh, N. S. On State Work: 
Rev. VV. W. Spiker, Indiana ; Rev. Jacob 
Snyder, Roaring Springs ; Rev. E. 
Cronenwett, Butler. On Finance : Rev. 
C. F. Johnston, Tarentum ; Rev. R. B. 
Campbell, Blairsville; Rev. W. B. Stod- 
dard, Washington, D. C. On Resolu- 
tions : Rev. Robt. Park, Parnassus ; 
Rev. J. H. Cassidy, Johnstown; Rev. C. 
V. Sheatsley, Fairhaven. 

The following were introduced to the 
Convention, and made short addresses: 
Rev. W. B. Stoddard, Rev. W. W. Spik- 
er. Rev. R. B. Campbell, Rev. C. F. 
Johnston, Rev. A. Lenkerd. 'The Min- 
utes were read, corrected, and on motion 
approved. Adjournment, Doxology and 
Benediction. 



The second session of the Convention 
met in the Free Methodist church at 7 130 
p. m., with Rev. C. F. Johnston, Taren- 
tum, presiding. The devotional exercises 
were conducted by the Chairman. Rev. 
J. A. Alexander, Crafton, gave a master- 
ly address on the subject, "Is Lodge 
Connection Helpful to the Christian 
Life?" By a unanimous vote he was 
requested to prepare the address for pub- 
lication in the Cynosure. A generous 
collection was then taken for Conven- 
tion expenses. Prof. W. J. Swigert, 
Huntington, gave a stirring address on 
the subject, "Lodge Effect on Home and 
Church." Doxology and Benediction. 



The third session of the Convention 
met in the Free Methodist church, March 
19. at 9 a. m., Rev. A. S. Dornheim, 
Beaver Falls, presiding. The devotional 
exercises were conducted by the Chair- 
man. The minutes of the previous ses- 
sion were read and approved. 

Letters were read before the Conven- 
tion from Rev. A. S. Dornheim. Beaver 
Falls; Rev. Dr. H. H. George, Beaver 
Falls; Rev. J. S. T. Milligan, Pitts- 
burgh; Rev. H. W. Armstrong, 
Pittsburgh; Rev. T. H. Acheson, 
Pittsburgh; Mervin Manning, High- 



spire ; Rev. Win. Dillon, Huntington, 
Ind. ; J. C. Young, Degolia ; Rev. J. C. 
McFeeters, Philadelphia; Rev. A. S. 
Aiken, Airville ; J. C. Burg, Scottdale ; 
Horace R. Schoenhut, Philadelphia ; 
Rev. Enos H. Hess, Grantham ; Rev. A. 
D. Zahniser, Blairsville ; S. B. Latshaw, 
Barto ; Rev. D. M. Landis, Palmyra; 
Rev. E. Cronenwett, Butler ; John S. 
White, Highspire ; Rev. W. W. Spiker, 
Indiana ; Rev. George W. Perry, Ship- 
pensburg; Rev. Jacob Snyder, Roaring 
Springs ; Rev. C. F. Johnston, Taren- 
tum ; Rev. A. S. Shelly, Bally; J. S. Yau- 
key, Fayetteville ; Rev. Sam H. Tertzler, 
Elizabethtown ; Rev. F. C. Sproul, Pitts- 
burgh ; S. R. Smith, Grantham ; from 
Albion, Neb. ; from R. A. McCoy, New 
Brighton; H. L. Molyneux, Forksville ; 
Rev. C. F. Kreider, Cleona ; G. N. Faul- 
kenstein, Elizabethtown ; G. P. Siebel, 
Lancaster; Mrs. Ella M. Gibbony, Phil- 
adelphia ; Dr. Chas. A. Blanchard, 
Wheaton, 111.; Dr. T. T. Myers, Hunt- 
ingdon. On motion, it was requested 
that these communications be sent to the 
Christian Cynosure. 

The Committee on Nominations made 
the following report : 

For President, Rev. J. C. McFeeters, Phil- 
adelphia ; for Vice-President, Rev. J. W. Bur- 
ton, Chambersburg ; for Secretary, Rev. M. C. 
Swigert, Germantown ; for Treasurer, Rev. A. 
S. Shelly, Bally. 

On motion the report was adopted, 
and the officers elected as named. 

The Committee on State Work made 
the following report : 

Your Committee on State Work would re- 
spectfully report : 

We discover an alarming condition of af- 
fairs in the Keystone State. During the past 
year lodges have increased in membership and 
consequent power for evil. In this part of our 
State they have drawn to their membership 
ministers and church members in increased 
numbers. Their power of intimidation is evi- 
dently on the increase; and, while this iniquity 
abounds in a shocking measure, "the love of 
many waxes cold." Ministers and business 
and professional men are intimidated, and few 
of those who know of the evil are speaking 
against it. 

This is one side of the picture. On ihe 
other side we may say : The Eastern Secretary 
has never put forth greater efforts than dur- 
ing the year past. The results of these ef- 
forts, and of those of testifying churches, and 
of ministers free to speak their convictions, are 
most gratifying. Thank God, this pall of dark- 
ness is not over all. While some testifying 
churches are speaking with feeble voice if a 1 : 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



•JM 



all, others are being aroused to greater activ- 
ity. Ours is the banner State in the circula- 
tion of the Christian Cynosure. Her re- 
sources are great, and are being turned in 
larger measure to the support of this reform 
work as the need becomes apparent. The love 
of Christ gives impulse, while the certainty of 
ultimate victory cheers in the conflict. 

In nature, as in morals, "the darkest hour is 
just before the dawn." The cowards who 
said nothing, or who sided with the slave- 
holders, before the war, were many of them 
on the band wagon shouting freedom when it 
was the popular thing to do. The same kind 
of people, are to-day afraid to speak out, or 
are taking sides with the enemies of Christ 
in the lodges. 

Your Committee would recommend : 
• 1st. That thanks be given to those who have 
kindly contributed in support of our efforts, 
pledging to them and to all God's faithful ones 
our best efforts in the future. 

2d. That a suitable one of our number be 
selected to carry our greeting to the National 
Annual Meeting to be held in Chicago, 111., 
May 23d prox., and that the expense incident 
to the going be paid from the State treasury 
if funds sufficient are in hand. 

3d. That we indorse such as we may select 
of our number to push the work during the 
coming year, and will aid them by such funds 
as may be at our disposal. 

On motion, Rev. W. W. Spike r, In- 
diana ; Rev. A. Lenkerd, Hites ; Rev. 
D. W. Rose, Birdville, and Rev. C. F. 
Johnston, Tarentum, were recommended 
by this Convention as suitable to do such 
work as the Association may suggest. 
On motion. Rev. J. A. Alexander, Craf- 
ton, was elected to represent our Asso- 
ciation in the Annual National Conven- 
tion to be held in Chicago, 111., May 23, 
1912. On motion. Rev. W. B. Stoddard 
was instructed to appoint an alternate 
should Air. Alexander be unable to at- 
tend. 

The Committee on Finance made the 
following- report : 

[Xo report has been received — 
Editor.] t 
The report was adopted. 

Rev. H. W. Armstrong, Pittsburgh, 
gave a very interesting address on the 
subject, 'The Holy Spirit and the 
Lodge." Adjournment. Doxology and 
Benediction. 



The fourth session of the Convention 
assembled in the Free Methodist church 
at 2:00 p. m., Rev. H. W. Armstrong, 
Pittsburgh, presiding. The devotional 
exercises were conducted by the Chair- 
man. The minutes of the previous ses- 



sion were read and approved. Rev. 
Jacob Snyder, Roaring Springs, gave a 
soul-stirring address on the subject, 
"Whited Sepulchers." Rev. C. V. 
Sheatsley, Fairhaven, addressed the Con- 
vention in a forceful manner on the sub- 
ject, "Is Lodge Secrecy Ever Neces- 
sary ?" He was requested to prepare his 
address for publication in the Cynosure, 
Rev. W. B. Stoddard, Washington, D. 
C, gave a very instructive talk on "Look- 
ing Into a Masonic Lodge." A complete 
report of the Finance Committee was 
submitted and a deficit of over $8 re- 
ported. A liberal offering was taken to 
help meet this deficit. 

The following resolutions, prepared 
by the Committee on Resolutions, were 
presented to the Convention by Rev. 
Robt. Park, Parnassus, and discussed 
and adopted : 

Whereas, Lodges claiming to be religious, 
semi-religious and beneficial are in our midst, 
and 

Whereas, The whole Secret Lodge System 
is proven to be injurious to all God-ordained 
institutions ; therefore be it 

Resolved, first : As Christ brings the only 
hope of salvation to this world, and as He is 
rejected either directly or indirectly by even- 
secret lodge, no Christian should belong to a 
secret society. 

Resolved, second : The so-called ''good 
things" of lodges are out of place. Good men 
and good things should be in churches, where 
they may honor Christ and build up His king- 
dom. 

Resolved, third: We believe that there is 
unusual danger to our young men in the dis- 
sipating Lodge Clubs known as '•Owls." 
"Eagles." "Elks," "Moose," and the like; and 
we would aid the civil authorities in the effort 
to root out these enemies and destroyers of all 
righteousness. 

Resolved, fourth : Funerals of Lodge men 
in Tarentum and elsewhere are parading their 
sad spectacle before the world of the professed 
followers of Jesus Christ, unequally yoked to- 
gether with the unrighteous and the wicked. 
We Christians should heed the admonition and 
command to come out from among them and 
be separate. 

Resolved, fifth : Labor lodges are giving the 
world an example of how Secret Societies arc 
often used. The self-confessed dynamiters 
evidently thought they were carrying out the 
wishes of those who paid them. * The Lodge 
affords a natural shield for that which is evil. 

Resolved, sixth : The statement that we must 
join lodges to know their real character is 
absurd ; for we do not have to enter saloons 
or houses of ill fame to ascertain their char- 
acter. Neither do we have to take poison, to 
know that it kills. 

Resolved, seventh : We believe our countrv 



24 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May. 1912. 



should destroy the "Black Hand" and even- 
other lodge that may be used to thwart justice. 

Resolved, eighth: We rejoice in the assur- 
ance that the kingdom of light is to banish the 
kingdom of darkness. All lodges are to be 
brought to naught, their folly and sin made 
manifest in the glorious day to which we 
hasten. Christ will reign, and His people 
triumph. In the Gospel light, lodge darkness 
must Mee away, its selfish spirit be clearly seen 
and its pompous parade of greatness fall to 
the ground. 

Resolved, ninth : Never was there greater 
need for the work that this Association is do- 
ing. Churches and Christian people must be 
aroused to withstand and expose the Lodge 
evil. Its insidious spirit is everywhere felt, 
while to us is given the duty and honor of 
working for the destruction of this Anti- 
Christ. 

Resolved, tenth : A vote of thanks is due and 
is hereby given to pastor and people of this 
church for their kindly assistance in this Con- 
vention. 

The minutes were read and approved. 
Adjournment, Doxology and Benedic- 
tion. 



The fifth session of the Convention 
commenced in the Free Methodist 
church at 7:30 p. m., Rev. W. B. Stod- 
dard presiding. The devotional exer- 
cises were conducted by the Chairman. 
The Chairman read a telegram from 
Rev. J. H. Cassidy, Johnstown, stating 
that serious illness in his home would 
prevent him from being present to take 
his place on the program. Mr. Stoddard 
then gave an address on the subject, 
"Lodge Power." A generous offering- 
was taken for Convention expenses. Rev. 
R. H. Martin, of Beaver Falls, addressed 
the Convention on the subject, "Lessons 
from the McNamara Case." Doxology 
and Benediction. 

The Convention was well attended 
throughout, and many received light that 
will cause them to see more clearly than 
ever the evils of the Lodge System. 
R. B. Campbell, Secretary. 



IMPRESSIONS OF THE STATE CON- 
VENTION. 

It was my privilege to attend the meet- 
ing of the Pennsylvania State Conven- 
tion of the National Christian Associa- 
tion, held in the Free Methodist Church 
at Tarentum, Pennsylvania, in the after- 
noon of March 19, 191 2. The afternoon 
meeting was fairly well attended, and 
at night the house was full. The ad- 



dresses were all of a high order ; plain 
Gospel truth was presented in the spirit 
of the Master. 

Rev. C. V. Sheatsley made a fine ad- 
dress with unanswerable arguments 
ag-ainst Christians joining lodges. He 
said that we have three divine institu- 
tions ; namely, the family, the church 
and the state. "Show me how the Lodge 
will make me a better husband and 
father, a better Christian, a better cit- 
izen, and I will join the Lodge. Until 
you can do this, I must refuse to join." 
Brother Sheatsley is a young man, and 
it is encouraging to see such men identi- 
fying themselves with the anti-secret 
cause. Our brother is a pupil of Rev. 
S. P. Long of Mansfield, Ohio, which 
accounts for his clear vision of Lodges, 
as Brother Long is a power for the open 
life. 

Brother Stoddard gave a talk from 
his Masonic Chart which was very good. 
The resolutions reported by the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions and presented by 
the Rev. Robert Park were strong. 

The evening meeting was well attend- 
ed, many lodge men being present. The 
Rev. J. H. Cassidy was unable to come, 
on account of sickness in his family, and 
his time was taken by Rev. W. B. Stod- 
dard in an address on the subject, 
"Wherein lies the power of the Lodge?" 
It was good. Rev. R. H. Martin gave 
us a fine address. All who know Broth- 
er Martin know his power in making 
clear the truth. He was radical, but 
kind and fair. My impression is that it 
was one of the best meetings I have ever 
attended. The spirit of kindness pre- 
vailed. 

Rev. C. F. Johnson, pastor of the 
church, deserves much credit for his 
faithful service. The writer is much 
indebted to this good brother and his 
noble wife for the kindness shown him. 
I am not a Free Methodist, but wish to 
say that no true reformer will ever fail 
to get the hearty support of the Free 
Methodist brethren. They stand four- 
square on reform work, and are not 
afraid to identify themselves with un- 
popular reforms, as many professors are. 

We anti-secret people ought to take 
courage; the cause is growing; God is 
blessing our work. I see a change in 
our favor year by year. Forty years 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



25 



ago, when I commenced in the work, we 
were hooted in the street, and our 
notices of meetings were torn down ; 
but not so now. ''Fear not, little flock ; 
for it is your Father's good pleasure to 
give you the kingdom." 

R. A. McCoy. 
New Brighton, Pa. 



MICHIGAN ASSOCIATION. 

Executive Committee Meeting. 
Williamston, Mich., March 22. 1912. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips. 

Dear Brother, and Editor of Chris- 
tian Cynosure: Greeting in Jesus' 
name. This is to advise you, that, on 
March 20, at Hotel Hermitage, in Grand 
Rapids, the Executive Committee of the 
Michigan Christian Association held one 
of its best and most enthusiastic meet- 
ings. This was the semi-annual meeting*, 
and was attended by all the officers. 

Much credit is due our earnest presi- 
dent. Rev. A. B. Bowman, and also our, 
vice-president. Rev. J. J. Hiemenga. 
who, in behalf of his church, placed in 
the treasury of the Association twenty 
dollars in cash. May many more pas- 
tors do as well. 

A tentative program for the State 
Convention in November was arranged, 
which indicates a purpose not to do less, 
but greater things in opposition to that 
gigantic system of darkness — the Secret 
Empire. 

Plans were made to bring to the fall 
Convention speakers of national reputa- 
tion, as well as some of the best from 
Michigan. 

It is the purpose of the Committee to 
locate the Convention in western Mich- 
igan, probably in Holland or Zeeland, in 
Ottawa County. Such location will in- 
sure a splendid local attendance. This 
matter was placed in the hands of Broth- 
er J. J. Hiemenga, of Grand Rapids. 

November 6-7 was set as the date of 
the Convention. 

A larger circulation of literature was 
advocated by the Committee, and confi- 
dence was expressed that the canvass 
now going on for members of the Asso- 
ciation and for subscribers to the Cyno- 
sure would show much better returns 
in the next few months than in the past. 

Rev. J. J. Hiemenga, of Grand Rap- 



ids, was elected delegate to the next 
Annual Convention of the National As- 
sociation. 

The meeting was closed with a sea- 
son of prayer led by A. R. Merrill, of 
Williamston, Mich., and the Committee 
separated feeling that it had been good 
to be there, and with renewed zeal for 
the work. 

A. R. Merrill, Secretary. 



A VALUABLE WORKER. 
Brumfield, Ky., March 14. 1912. 
National Christian Association : Your 
books wherever read by those who are 
not Masons have the desired effect. 
Somehow we all love to work when we 
can see the fruit of our labors. I know 
of no religious work that is half as 
fruitful as distributing anti-secrecy lit- 
erature. It is true that some opposition 
is aroused, but it should only give us a 
moral backbone, and a holy enthusiasm. 
M. D. L. Cacanougher. 



SECRETARY STODDARD'S LETTER. 

New York City, April 13. 1912. 
Dear Cynosure : 

Again I am permitted to address you 
from the great metropolis. The ordinary 
mind staggers in an effort to compre- 
hend the vastness of the wealth, and en- 
terprises centered here. A steamboat to 
cost over ten millions is being construct- 
ed. The Woolworth building, it i- stated, 
will be the business home of twenty 
thousand. Its construction will require 
some fourteen million dollars. The an- 
nual revenue from its rentals is expect- 
ed to bring two and one-half million. 
One-sixth of the wealth of our country 
is in the possession of those residing 
here. What can one man do in a held 
so vast? Something for sure! The bee 
builds only a small part of the wealth 
of the hive, but helps nevertheless. We 
are told that the builder of the Wool- 
worth started as a poor boy in a five and 
ten-cent store in Syracuse, New York. 
He now gathers the nickels and dimes 
from his two hundred and eighty-seven 
stores scattered over the country. His 
holdings are supposed to be worth at 
least thirtv million dollars. 

Amid all this vastness of operation and 
effort the N. C. A. has its place and in- 



26 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



fluence. In my visits from time to time, 
I am brought into active touch with the 
centers of reform effort. The pastors 
are especially sought out, and their gath- 
erings influenced, as God gives ability, 
and as opportunity is afforded. Your 
representative was given a welcome and 
permitted to address a conference of 
the Missouri Synod Lutheran pastors on 
last Tuesday. The efforts of the society 
called the "Guardians of Liberty" were 
being considered. Pastor Wm. Schoen- 
feld presented and endorsed the princi- 
ples of this society in his characteristic 
way, and offered a resolution, which was 
passed by the conference, giving sanc- 
tion to its effort. The "Guardians of 
Liberty" make a concentrated effort to 
oppose the aggressions of Rome in our 
civic affairs. That there is great need, 
no protestant acquainted with conditions 
will question for a moment. While pri- 
vacy is required in its operations, it has 
no ritual, and was thought in no legiti- 
mate sense to be a secret society. These 
pastors would not knowingly endorse a 
secret society. Pastor Schoenfeld is a 
"live wire" — an aggressive reformer. 

I speak tomorrow, God willing, in the 
Hooper Street Free Methodist church, 
Brooklyn. The mail brings a cordial 
invitation to visit and address the stu- 
dents of the Christian and Missionary 
Alliance of Nyack College, as I return 
next week from my visit to the New 
England field. We should rejoice that 
so many colleges give us audience. Here 
we may speak to the Christian men and 
women of the future. 

Beginning April 23d, there is to be a 
conference of the General Council Luth- 
erans in Brooklyn, New York, at which 
some ninety or more pastors are expect- 
ed to be present. The president of this 
Conference, Rev. H. C. Wasmund, is 
most cordial, and with his endorsement, 
it is expected I shall get a good hearing. 

Going back to our Pennsylvania State 
gathering, I wish to report a helpful 
meeting. It was not all that I had hoped 
as to attendance of those from distant 
points. Locally, the friends sustained 
the work well. Taking into consideration 
all the difficulties, it was a success. Seed 
sown will result in glory to God and good 
to many souls. The money contributions 



did not quite meet the need, but fortu- 
nately the treasury was not empty. 

A week spent in Allentown, Pennsyl- 
vania and vicinity yielded all that could 
be reasonably expected. Congregations 
in the Brethren and Free Methodist 
churches gave careful hearing to my 
messages. The Cynosure list was en- 
larged, and requests for further meet- 
ings given. At Bally, Souderton, Emaus, 
Macungie and elsewhere in that section, 
friends gave good support to my efforts. 

I was much gratified to visit again 
with Dr. Backenstoe and wife, mission- 
aries, on a furlough from the African 
field. He told of increased interest in 
N. C. A. effort in that dark and far dis- 
tant land. 

It is my intention to visit Boston and 
other Massachusetts cities next week. 
Friends near Mount Gilead, Ohio, have 
asked for lectures early in May. Will 
hope to visit Berne and other Indiana 
points en route to annual meeting. Any 
friends in that section wishing such help 
as I may give should address me at once 
at 31 18 14th street, N. W., Washington, 
D. C 

Let all, who can, attend the annual 
meeting at Chicago, and make this com- 
ing convention a mighty power for good. 
Yours in the work, 

W- B. Stoddard. 



"LIZZIE WOOD'S LETTER." 

Jackson, Tenn., March 26, 1912. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother Phillips : I have been 
teaching Bible lessons at Dyersburg, 
Tenn., all of this winter. One Sunday 
evening we had for our lesson the death 
of John the Baptist (Matt. 14). I said 
to the class that John the Baptist was 
put in prison for rebuking sin. When 
we read the ninth verse, I said, "Now we 
see it is wrong to take foolish, wicked 
oaths like the poor people do in the se- 
cret societies." I then took up the oaths 
of Free Masonry, and told the penalties 
of the first three degrees. 

There were two lodge men in the class, 
and they looked at each other so aston- 
ished that it was very amusing. After 
the lesson was over, and we were com- 
ing down the aisle, one of the men said 
to me, "Sister Roberson, I like your 
teaching, but I don't think you ought to 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



27 



expose secrets like you did, before the 
whole Bible Band." I said, ''Sir, are 
you a Mason?" and he answered that he 
was, and that the Masons had done a 
great many good things. I said, "Why, 
sure they have, and they have done some 
very bad things also." He said, "What 
is it that we do that is so bad?" 
I said, "You kill men for your 
oath's -sake" (Matt. 14:9). He said 
"Well, I am a Christian and would 
not kill a man for anything on 
earth." I said, "Suppose some broth- 
er should tell your secrets, and it should 
fall to your lot to help execute him. You 
would have to do it for your oath's 
sake." He said, "We are not going to 
kill any one in our lodge.'' I said, "Then 
why do you swear to kill each other?" 
He said, "Lady, you don't know what 
you are talking about. Masonry is taken 
from the Bible." "Yes, sir," I said, "it 
is taken so far from the Bible that you 
cannot find it in the Bible !' Are Jubelo 
and Jubelum in the Bible?" He laughed 
and said that he didn't read the Bible 
much, but that great leaders in the order 
say that masonry is in the Bible. "Well. 
Jesus is my leader, and He said, Tn 
secret have I said nothing.' ' While we 
were talking the other brother said, "I 
have heard more deviltry to-day about 
secret societies than ever before in my 
life. I am an Odd Fellow, and I know 
that they do things in my lodge that I 
cannot tolerate, and I am going to quit 
from to-day." But the brother Mason 
went away grieved in his heart. He said 
to my husband the next day, "I like the 
Bible Band, at your church, and I like 
the way your wife explains the lessons, 
but she is fighting me, and I don't think 
I will come to the Band any more." My 
husband said to him, "My wife is not 
fighting- you, she did not know you were 
a Mason till you told her. She is. fight- 
ing the thing that you are in." He said, 
"Well, maybe I will come again some 
time," and so he did. He came back to 
the Bible Band, and sends his children 
to the Sunday School every Sunday. He 
told his lodge brothers about it, so we 
have a goodly number of men in the 
class every Sunday evening. I know 
what they come for, and I don't fail to 
speak of their idol-worship. While I 
talk, thev sit together, and nudcre each 



other. They got so stirred up finally 
that two came out to my house. They 
did not say anything about their lodges, 
but just said that they wanted me to 
explain some different Scriptures to 
them, and so I did. And I also explained 
some things to them about lodges. They 
went away seemingly in good humor. 

I have been here at Jackson for ten 
days. The day we left Dyersburg, I had 
just received the tracts you sent. There 
were several preachers on the train, so 
my husband gave each of them a tract 
to read. One of them read the tract 
called "Free Masonry," and he got so 
angry that he said, "There is always 
someone trying to find fault with some- 
one else." My husband asked him if he 
was a secret society man. He replied, 
"Yes, and these tracts are divulging our 
secrets. The man that sent this tract out 
must be an old sanctified man." My 
husband said, "What are you?" He said 
that he was a preacher. Then I handed 
out another tract called "Baptists." He 
looked at it, and said, "I don't want to 
read any more of them," but he put them 
in his pocket. When we got to Rives, 
Tenn., we had to wait four hours for 
the train to Jackson, and all of those 
preachers got off the train, and went up 
town talking about those tracts. My 
husband tried to keep up with them, but 
they dodged around to get an opportu- 
nity to talk among themselves about 
their lodges. All five of them belonged 
to some kind of a lodge. When our 
train for Jackson came, we left all of 
them, except the one that was so angry 
who came as far as Rutherford. My 
husband tried to talk to our angry broth- 
er, but he would not talk. That tract 
called "Free Masonry" was enough, for 
him. 

Well, I will tell you about Jackson in 
my next letter. I am waiting just now 
for some masonic brothers who told me 
at church Sunday night that they wanted 
to call and see me this week. . They are 
coming to see the ritual you sent me. 

Well. God bless you, my dear broth- 
ers and sisters in Christ, who are fight- 
ing sin in high places. I want to come 
to your meeting in May. I remain 

Yours against lodges and all sin. 

Lizzie Woods Robersox. 



28 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



FROM AGENT DAVIDSON. 

Bunkie, La., March 14, 1912. 

Dear Brother Phillips. The secret- 
ists attempted to get up a petition to run 
me out of Alexandria, but their efforts 
were thwarted. They are now plan- 
ning" to have me indicted by the Grand 
Jury, and to give me all the trouble they 
can. 1 shall be compelled to employ 
legal counsel. If any of our friends can 
contribute to help me I will appreciate it 
very much indeed. 

I am here attending the Executive 
Board of the Eighth District Baptist As- 
sociation. A number of ministers are 
here from Grand Rapids and Avoyelles 
parishes, most of whom are anti-secret- 
ists. Baal, however, has here a few of 
his worshipers at the masonic shrine. 

The Baptist ministers' weekly confer- 
ence of the City of Alexandria and vicin- 
ity, in the regular meeting last Monday, 
after hearing witnesses relative to the 
attack made on myself, March 5, adopt- 
ed the following, to-wit : "We find, from 
evidence submitted, that Rev. Israel 
Thomas was the aggressor, and that lie 
provoked Rev. F. J. Davidson by fol- 
lowing him up threatening and shaking 
his finger in his face, which caused Rev. 
Davidson to strike him. Nevertheless, 
as ministers of the gospel, we are in duty 
bound to use every honorable endeavnr 
to make peace between them." 

The evil influence of secret societies 
upon the Christian Church, and the atti- 
tude we should hold toward the minister 
who will leave the church and desecrate 
the Christian Sabbath by parading in uni- 
form and preaching" annual sermons, 
was thoroughly discussed. Dr. H. B. N. 
Brown, Rev. j. S. Smith, M. Byas, P. 
Patterson, G. W. Davis, B. J. C. Wash- 
ington and F. J. Davidson taking part, 
after which the following was unani- 
mously adopted, viz. : "That any minis- 
ter belonging to this Conference who 
shall hereafter leave his church to par- 
ade the streets, or go to halls to preach 
lodge or society sermons on the Sab- 
bath, shall be expelled from our Con- 
ference, and the bond of fellowship shall 
be withdrawn from him." 

One of the officers of my church re- 
ported at the last meeting of my of- 
ficial board, that one of the professors 
a school teacher of this city and high- 



monkey-monk in the Secret Empire, no- 
tified him that he (the secretist) and a 
number of his lodge henchmen had de- 
cided to get up a petition and ask me, 
or rather force me, to resign Shiloh 
Church and leave the city. My official 
board pledged their united support to 
me in this crucial hour. 

It has been finally decided by a little 
clan of lodgemen that I am working my 
own speedy destruction by oposing their 
false worship. But finally one of the 
clan, a preacher, said: "While I don't 
think Davidson ought to be so very out- 
spoken against our lodge, and I believe 
he will hurt himself and cripple his in- 
fluence — yet, brothers, we must admit 
that what he says is true. The lodges 
are good for our protection ; but they 
are paralyzing and killing the churches, 
and drawing the people from churches, 
and I believe myself there must be a halt 
somewhere." 

This minister is a young man of very 
promising qualities. I believe him to be 
an honest and conscientious Christian 
gentleman ; but unfortunately, like hun- 
dreds of other good young men, he has 
been deceived by older ones, and led into 
the secret lodge room, and with a cable 
tow bound about his neck, has bowed 
at the false altar of heathendom, ami 
taken the terrible profane oath of ma- 
sonic obedience. I rejoice, however, to 
know that he had courage to tell his 
lodge clansmen that their lodges are 
working injury to the Lamb's bride, the 
church of the Living God. He is a read- 
er of the Cvnosure ; and I feel quite 
confident that he will eventually become 
convinced of the sin and folly of oath 
bound secret societies, and renounce his 
allegiance to Baalam. 

I have made a tour through Rapid.% 
Avoyelles and St. Loudry parishes, and 
delivered several lectures and sermons 
against the Secret Lodge system and its 
evil doings. I preached a sermon and 
delivered an address before the Execu- 
tive Board of the Eighth District Bap- 
tist Association, at Bunkie, La. ; and Mr. 
H. B. N. Brown and I each delivered 
stirring addresses, in the chapel of the 
Bunkie Baptist Academy, to their one 
hundred and fifty students, and distrib- 
uted tracts. Prof. Willis, who was one 
of my Sunday School pupils in New 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 






Orleans twenty years ago. endorsed all 
we said, and the students and faculty ex- 
tended us a vote of thanks, and greeted 
us with the college yell. Dr. Brown was 
very enthusiastic, and gave much whole- 
some advice to faculty and students. He 
is an out and out antisecretist and one 
of the strongest and most talented min- 
isters of the state. I also delivered an 
address "to the hundred students at the 
public school in Pineville. La., under 
Miss Kelso, who is a very proficient and 
earnest principal, and is doing a great 
work for her race and the community. 

I rejoice to say that the Shiloh 
Church is standing firmly and boldly with 
me in mv- fight for a pure gospel church. 
The lodge element, however, is doing all 
in their power to sow seed of discord. 
The lodges now have begun their annual 
sermons, parades and tomfoolery: and 
they are trying to make my people be- 
lieve that were it not for their pastor's 
opposition to lodges, they would bring 
their lodges to the church, and give them 
two hundred or three hundred dollars to- 
ward the payment of their note, which 
will soon fall due. Of course, this does 
have some little bearing on the mind of 
some : but the rank and file are seem- 
ingly loyal to me. I ask God's faithful 
everywhere to pray God's blessing upon 
us, and that we may be prepared to meet 
our note without trouble next month. 

jVIay God bless you in your great mis- 
sion of truth to dethrone Satan and en- 
throne Christ. 

Yours for righteousness. 

F. T. Davidson. 



THE CLIQUE SPIRIT. 

Bruin, Pa.. Feby. 23. 1912. 

Dear Cynosure : 

I am most deeply interested in your 
continuous campaign against the forces 
of' darkness. I have distributed your 
literature and expect to improve future 
opportunities in the cause. One evil 
which is pre-eminently a lodge character- 
istic is the clique spirit, of which the fol- 
lowing is an instance : Having served with 
three Masons on a school board. I no- 
ticed that in a period of seven years, the 
entire time we were fellow members, 
they all voted on the same side of every 
question that came up. 



In doctrine and character the lodge is 
essentially opposed to the church. I have 
observed that persons who are members 
of both are not loyal to both. 

I am at a loss to know how a man of 
"Billy" Sunday's ability can fail to rec- 
ognize the antagonistic principles of 
these two institutions. At the close oi 
the Canton meetings the lodges were 
urged to come across with handsume con- 
tributions because they had been ban led 
some might}- nice bouquets during the 
meetings. It would be more fitting if 
such an opportunity were used to hand 
them what is really coming to them, 
which is not bouquets. 

Yours truly. 

T. A. Cross. 



"BEWARE OF DOGS." 

BY EVAXGELI5T DAVIS. 

Paul says (Phil. 3:21 to every Chris- 
tian. "Beware of dogs, beware of evil 
workers." I have often thought: 'AVhat 
does Paul mean by such a mode of warn- 
ing?" but I don't have to wonder any 
longer, as near here, in this part of the 
state, in Texas County, a secret order 
was organized, on March 9. 1912. by the 
name of "Houn' Dog." \Ye know that 
the hound is the most filthy in its habits 
of all dogs ; and O. how they will kill 
sheep ! 

I send you an article from the "Hous- 
ton 1 Texas County) Herald." giving- an 
account of the org-anization of the order. 
Xow. of course, as the dear men (so- 
called ) have a new fraternal order to 
take care of them, the women, in turn, 
must have an affiliated order for them- 
selves, to take care of them and save 
them. 

Some propose to go to heaven any 
way. The}" want to go. You can hear 
them say, "There are many ways to go 
to heaven." and among these ways they 
seem to reckon the secret society. But 
not so says the Scripture (Prov. 18:10), 
"The name of the Lord is a strong tow- 
er : the righteous runneth into it. and is 
safe." 

You see the fight is on. Pray for me 
in this great missionary field. 

Yours for the one faith. 

J. L. Davis. 

Tandv. Mo. 



30 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1912. 



THE MASONIC PLAN. 

Dear Brother : Our present Attorney 
General, in his oration before the Grand 
Masonic Lodge of Texas on Dec. I, 
1908. said: "It is through our great 
fraternity that the universal brotherhood 
of man is to be accomplished, for around 
our sacred shrine the just and upright 
of all nations kneel — the Christian, the 
Moslem, the Hebrew, alike. Here it is 
that we find the great hand of Provi- 
dence weaving the golden thread of 
brotherly love that will knit the human 
race together." 

Is this a true statement of the claims 
of Masonry? All well-informed Masons 
must admit that it is. Masonry claims 
( 1 ) that in it is to be accomplished the 
universal brotherhood of man, and (2) 
that this is to be accomplished by gath- 
ering Christians, Moslems and Hebrews 
as worshipers around the same shrine — 
the sacred ( ?) shrine of Masonry. In 
view of the fact that at least three- 
fourths if not four-fifths of the human 
race can never become members of the 
Masonic lodge, the statement that in 
Masonry the universal brotherhood of 
man is to be accomplished is ridiculous 
in the extreme. What ! The universal 
brotherhood of man to be realized in an 
institution from which the greater part 
of the race is forever excluded? Such a 
claim is too preposterous for discussion 
were it not for the subtle snare that it 
contains. It is one of Satan's traps for 
catching the souls of men and keeping 
them away from Christ. 

Men will become spiritual brothers 
only as they are created anew in Christ 
Jesus and so have one common Father ; 
only as they become children of God. 
This is the divine plan. How do men 
become children of God? "Ye are all 
the children of God by faith in Christ 
Jesus." (Gal. 3:26.) The Hebrews and 
Moslems have not faith in Christ, and 
hence are not children — have not God as 
their Father — do not belong to the di- 
vine brotherhood. What kind of a broth- 
erhood is it, then, in which Christ-re- 
jecting Jews and infidel Moslems are 
gathered as worshipers ? It is a brother- 
hood of the world, and is instituted by 
Satan, the god of this world, for the 
purpose of ensnaring the souls of men. 
Its plan is the opposite of the divine 



plan. To realize that this last statement 
is true, you have but to read carefully 
and prayerfully the following passage 
from God's Word, and compare it with 
the plan of Masonry as outlined in the 
above quotation: "Be ye not unequally 
yoked together with unbelievers" (2 Cor. 
6:14-18). The Masonic plan for accom- 
plishfing the universal brotherhood of 
man is to yoke together Christians, un- 
believing Jews and infidel Moslems. God 
calls upon us to separate ourselves from 
such unbelievers and infidels in order 
that we might have Him as our Father, 
become His sons and daughters, and 
thus accomplish the divine brotherhood. 
In order that I might further enforce 
and illustrate the antichristian nature of 
Masonry, I call your attention to the 
explanation of the use of the common 
gavel, given in Taylor's Monitor, page 
25 : "The common gavel is an instru- 
ment made use of by operative Masons 
to break off the rough and superfluous 
parts of stones, the better to fit them 
for the builder's use ; but we, as Free and 
Accepted Masons are taught to make 
use of it for the more noble and" glori- 
ous purpose of divesting our minds and 
consciences of all the vices and super- 
fluities of life, thereby fitting ourselves, 
as living stones, for that spiritual build- 
ing, that house not made with hands, 
eternal in the heavens." Are Masons 
really in earnest about this claim? I 
take it that they are. If so, we have the 
Christ-rejecting Jew (who is as good a 
Mason as any other) fitting himself, by 
the use of the common gavel, for that 
"spiritual building, that house not made 
with hands, eternal in the heavens." We 
have the infidel Moslem preparing him- 
self for heaven by the use of the imple- 
ments of Masonry. This is the inevit- 
able conclusion from the above statement 
from the Masonic Monitor. You as a 
man of sense can but see that. You cer- 
tainly know that, if men ever come to 
heaven, they must first be saved from 
sin. God's word says of Christ. "Nei- 
ther is there salvation in any other : for 
there is none other name under heaven 
given among men, whereby we must be 
saved." (Acts 4:12.) Masonic Jews and 
Moslems reject Christ, the only name 
by which they must be saved, and so will 
be lost, even though they use the Ma- 



May, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



31 



sonic implements all their lives. Can 
such a wickedly false claim be an inno- 
cent thing ? You sometimes grumble be- 
cause some men seem to think that Ma- 
sonry is a good enough religion for 
them, and thus slight Christianity. If 
the claims of [Masonry are true, such 
men are right. [Masonry claims to fit 
men for heaven. That is all Christianity 
claims to Tlo. If [Masonry can do all this 
for a man, where is the inconsistency in 
a man devoting his time to [Masonry and 
neglecting Christianity, which only 
claims to do the same thing that [Ma- 
sonry does? Such men are only taking 
the claims of [Masonry seriously. Their 
thoughts concerning it are only the legit- 
imate fruits of the system. The claims 
of the institution are false, and thou- 
sands of souls who believe those claims 
are true, are kept away from Christ, the 
only Savior of men. So the danger does 
not lie in what you think is a misappre- 
hension of Masonry, but in the Christless 
nature of the institution. Its altar is a 
Christless altar, its rites are Christless 
rites, its confession of faith is a Christ- 
less confession, its prayers are Christ- 
less prayers, and its worship is 
Christless worship. It is a com- 
mon Grand Lodge ruling that the 
name of Christ must not be men- 
tioned in the lodge worship, if it would 
offend any of the ([Jewish and [Moslem) 
brethren. So, if Christ's name is men- 
tioned in the lodge worship, it is unma- 
sonic, and the person doing it virtually 
breaks that part of the oath in which he 
promised to abide by all the rules and 
regulations of the Grand Lodge. Thus 
the name of Christ is authoritatively dis- 
honored, denied and cast out of the lodge 
worship. If you don't know that the 
above it true, you are very ignorant con- 
cerning a system of which you claim to 
know much. It being true that Masonry 
dishonors and denies Christ by casting 
His name out of its worship, let us see 
what is its real relation to God according 
to the teaching of the Bible. Jesus says, 
"He that honoreth not the Son honoreth 
not the Father which hath sent him." 
(John 5:23.) John says. "Whosover 
denieth the Son, the same hath not the 
Father." (I John 2:23.) Thus, accord- 



ing to the plain teaching of God's Word, 
masonry, by dishonoring and denying 
Christ, is a God-dishonoring and godless 
institution. 

Let me give you a picture of what may 
occur in the lodge worship. In the East 
is a Christ-rejecting Jew ; in the West 
is an infidel Moslem ; you, a Christian 
minister, sit in the South ; and sitting 
on either side of the room are [Masonic 
brethren of all and no religious beliefs. 
You are called to prayer. The Christ- 
rejecting Jew leads, finishes and says 
"Amen." You and your motley crew 
of brethren say, "So mote it be." Does 
the prayer of that Christ-rejecting Jew 
and your motley crew of brethren reach 
the ear of God ? Certainly not : for Jesus 
says, "No man cometh unto the Father 
but by [Me." and Solomon tells us that. 
"The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomi- 
nation to the Lord." Are you guiltless, 
who uphold an institution in which such 
abominations occur in accordance with 
its fundamental principles? Let us see. 
The Bible says. "Whosoever transgres- 
seth. and abideth not in the doctrine of 
Christ, hath not God. He that abideth 
in the doctrine of Christ, he hath both 
the Father and the Son. If there come 
any unto you and bring not this doctrine, 
receive him not into your house, neither 
bid him Godspeed : for he that biddeth 
him Godspeed is partaker of his evil 
deeds." (II John 9-1 1.) You are cer- 
tainly engaging in worship with and bid- 
ding Godspeed to Jews and [Moslems, 
who deny the doctrine of Christ. God's 
Word says you are partaker of their 
evil deeds. Ah ! my brother, we had bet- 
ter hear, and exhort our people to hear, 
God's Word when He says, "Come out 
from among them and be ye .separate. 
saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean 
thing ; and I will receive you, and I will 
be a Father unto you, and ye shall be 
my sons and daughters, saith the Lord 
Almighty." Then shall we realize a 
genuine brotherhood founded upon our 
relation as sons and daughters of the 
Lord Almighty, and secured by the me- 
diatorial work of our Lord Jesus Christ. 
Your brother in Christ, 

(Rev.) T. M. Daltox. 

Corvell, Texas. 



32 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May. 1912. 



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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
850 W. Madison St. CHICAGO, ILL. 




Wherein lies peace 
In battle's bitter strife, 
In groanings for the light, 
In making all cf life 
One struggle for the right ; 

Through conflict lies the 
peace. 



Wherein lies hope? 
In One whom men have slain, 
In One they crucified. 
For He is risen again — • 
Is risen and glorified ; 

In Him, our Lord, our King, lies hope. 
— Thomas E. Kennedy. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE national christian association. 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS GENERAL OFFICERS. 

Managing editor. 
850 West Madison Street, Chicago. President, Rev. E. B. Stewart; Vice- 

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Poor Dan, by Rev. A. Thomson 34 

Harmless Legislation 34 

The New Standard— The Sure Founda- 
tion, by Rev. O. P. Gifford, D. D 35 

Initiative Cults 37 Those desiring lectures or addresses 

The World Currents 37 _ •, . r , , , , 

The Broken Seal, by Samuel D. Greene.' 38 m3y Wnte t0 any ° f the s P eakers named 

Sectarianism in Schools 40 below : 

Annual Meeting and Convention — t>~ ixr t> ci jj j o t-« xt. 

"Church and" Labor Lodged Address **£ W w l. I ' 3 V^ ^rteenth 

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Rev. B. E. Bergesen, Rev. David S. Des Moines, Iowa. 

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Next Station 50 homa City, Okla. 

Tong Trouble Terrifies 51 

A Federal Bureau Report 52 : 

Incorporated Unions 52 

A Notable New Book — "Stover at 

Yale" 53 

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For the Time Being 54 

Most Complete Worthy Master 54 HOUSE FOR SALE. 

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Woe Unto You Hypocrites 56 . w f , T11 . S ... „-. 

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A Years Review, by Secretary Stod- , . . . 

dard 58 * ars about a seven-room house, modern 

"Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter" 60 improvements, four lots, and within three 

A Murderer From the Beginning 62 , , , , A , , , ,, 

Our Southern Letter, by Rev. F. J. blocks of two depots, and about the same 

Davidson 62 distance from Wheaton College. 

Another Call From Afar, by Rev. 

Flagop V. Najarian 63 

A Patriotic Judge — Labor Union 

versus The Government 63 





Jesus answered him, — I spake openly 1»» (tie world; iiud in secret have I said nothing," J«iin 18:20. 



VOLUME XLV. 



CHICAGO, JUNE, 191: 



NUMBER 2 




The Roman Catholic church has three 
great organizations at work for further- 
ing Catholic interests in the country. 

The Knights of Columbus is political, 
rather than religious, already with over 
360,000 members bound by oath to de- 
fend their church in public affairs and 
political circles. 

The American Federation of Catholic 
Press, which includes several thousand 
editors and papers, which use their tre- 
mendous power to threaten and intimi- 
date business houses and secular editors 
who speak their mind on Catholic affairs, 
(and furnish copy for the secular press 
favorable to Romanism). 

And the American Federation of Cath- 
olic Societies, which at its meeting held 



in Columbus, Ohio, August 20-24, 191 1, 
under the guidance of the Apostolic Del- 
egate, adopted strong resolutions to boy- 
cott the sale and prevent the distribution 
of the "Encyclopedia Brittanica." — Luth- 
eran Herald. 



ANOTHER "FRATERNAL" WRECK. 

The fraternal insurance organization 
known as the "Knights of St. John and 
Malta'' is to be liquidated by the State 
Insurance Department. With 2,153 mem- 
bers, insurance of $2,319,000 in force, 
unpaid claims of $58,000, only $13,000 
assets in sight, and no aggressive disposi- 
tion on the part of the members to raise 
assessments to square things, no other 
outcome was possible. Hundreds of 
Brooklynites who have paid assessments 
for long terms of years lose practically 
all that they have put into the scheme of 
fraternal insurance. 

Fraternity Salt. 

The fact is, of course, that this and 
other secret societies organized chiefly to 
run insurance schemes have no real ele- 
ment of "fraternity" about them. A par- 
ticular member is a brother of the other 
members only to the degree that he hopes 
his brothers will not die and "salt him ' 
with assesments or use up resources 
which he relies upon to protect his fami- 
ly in case of his own death. Within this 
limitation his feeling is strong and genu- 
ine. 

In the Eagle's judgment the collapse 
of all such insurance is only a matter of 
time. For the losers it has sympathy. 
They can ill afford their losses. For t he- 
people who have not yet blundered into 
the trap it offers only the advice that i- 
involved in the old proverb : "Fools profit 
by their own experience; wise men by 
the experience of others." — The Brook- 
lyn Eagle. . 



;^4 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1912 



POOR DAN. 

BY REV. A. THOMSON. 

"When I was located on one of my 
fields in Illinois I had a remarkable so- 
ciety of Christian Endeavor. Finer young- 
people on the whole I never knew. That 
society was more active along all lines 
of Christian work than any other I knew. 
Especially was it active in the valuable 
work of the moral good Samaritan. It 
was in this work that they found poor 
Dan. 

Dan was a man of about thirty years ; 
a Catholic by birth and education ; a 
hard drinker with all its added frills ; a 
man very nearly in the submerged tenth. 
This was his condition when our young 
men found him. With kindly sympathetic 
effort they went out into the highways 
after him and led him by the hands of 
Christian love to his Father's home. He 
became interested — a regular member of 
our Christian Endeavor and was finally 
elected treasurer of the society. We had 

in that church good Dea. C ,a man 

who had in him the spirit of Christ. This 
good man owned a butter factory and 
was good enough to give Dan a job there, 
and even invited him into his own home. 

Few men have ever been more 
changed than Dan. His face glowed with 
happiness. It was like a gleam of sun- 
shine to meet him on the sidewalk going 
to or from his work, and his fidelity to 
the Christian Endeavor was unques- 
tioned. To myself he seemed greatly at- 
tached, and we often had pleasant con- 
versations together. This was the con- 
dition of things when one of the young 
men came to me with the word that Dan 
was about to join a secret society. I 
knew the lodge — it was one of the least 
objectionable, but it was full of ungodly 
men. In a lodge somewhere near a hun- 
dred members I could learn of only one 
Christian man. I knew what this would 
mean to poor Dan. I therefore sent for 
him, and in my study about the following 
conversation took place : 

"Dan, I hear that you are going to 
join a secret society. I am sorry to hear 
this. This lodge you are thinking of 
joining is full of non-Christian men. 
You are a young Christian, Dan, and do 
not know the evil to which you will be 
exposed. If I were you, I would not 
join." Along this, and other lines I reo- 



soned with him, seking to turn him from 
his purpose but all without avail. "I have 
handed in my name, he said, and my 
money. I feel I must now go in, but if 
you are going back upon me, I will be 
very sorry." 

This was the substance of Dan's reply. 
I answered, ''Dan, I never will gp back 
upon you. If what I have said has not 
convinced you, and your reason justifies 
you in connecting yourself with that 
lodge, of course, you must follow your 
judgment. I will never go back upon 
you, but Dan, I will tell you what will 
almost certainly happen : You will go 
back upon me. A time will come when 
you will have no use for my company." 
"Oh, no," he replied, "no fear of that," 
and with a foreboding heart, I saw him 
walk forth into the night. 

A month had hardly passed until the 
smile had gone from Dan's face when 
we met. In two months when he saw 
me coming if he could have turned an- 
other corner, he would not have met me. 
In three months he went to Chicago with 
our Christian Endeavor money and came 
home drunk. I remember seeing poor 
Dan but once after that. With two 
young men we called upon him at his 
home. He was sitting half propped up 
in a chair covered with loathsome sores. 
Hopeless and seeming almost soulless. 

Poor Dan, the lodge had made quick 
work of him. Often in after years as 
my mind has traveled back to that time, 
the words that stand at the head of this 
article have been in my mind. Poor 
Dan !— Endeavor, Wis. 



HARMLESS LEGISLATION. 

The Springfield Republican, which 
commands the attention of a choice con- 
stituency of readers everywhere and has 
been named "The statesman's paper." in- 
cludes the following paragraph in a re- 
cent Note and Comment column : 

The Mississippi Legislature has passed a 
law prohibiting secret societies in high schools 
and state educational institutions. The frater- 
nities are regarded as undemocratic in their 
principle and tendencies. Possibilities of de- 
bate on merits of mystic signs and dark se- 
crets as a basis for "the association of young 
men are endless, but Mississippi ought to be 
able to get along without these frills and a. 
good many folks will believe that the prohibi- 
tion won't hurt the young folks any. 



June, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



35 



THE NEW STANDARD. 
The Sure Foundation.* 

REV. 0. P. GIFFORD, D. D. 

God's knowledge is the basis of our 
activities. It is enough for you to know. 
You have to do. Disease has certain 
symptoms. So has righteousness — and 
a doctor can tell by feeling the pulse and 
taking the temperature and studying the 
tongue what the diseased germs are that 
are doing the work below the surface. 
The world is very acute in its diagnosis 
of the church and for you to claim that 
you are saved and not live a saved life 
may deceive yourself and may fool the 
world for a little time but not for long, 
and when the reaction comes it comes, 
not only against you but against the 
church. 

The Two Standards. 

The boy graduated at the school and 
went down to the college. He presented 
his documents but they must examine 
him first, so they give him a bit of Greek 
text and he cannot read a line of it. He 
cannot enter that college on his gradua- 
tion papers. The standards over there are 
more than the standards over here. You 
claim to be a student in the school of 
Christ. The world gives you its text- 
book of business. You cannot translate 
it. You cannot enter as a Christian man. 
We set great store by scholarship in find- 
ing Christ's teaching from the original. 
The Lord sets great store on righteous- 
ness in translating life into activity. 
"Let him that nameth the name of Christ 
depart from iniquity and from all un- 
righteousness. That is your business. 
It is God's business to know — and pos- 
sibly your shifting emotions, your 
changing of sentiments and changing of 
faith is due to the fact that you haven't 
departed from unrighteousness. 
In His Name. 

"Let him that nameth the name" — to 
name the name is to take the character, 
to assume the one is master whose name 
you have named. John and Jane stand 
by the marriage altar. They clasp hands. 
Jane says, "I, Jane, take thee, John, to be 
my wedded husband, to have and to hold, 
from this day forward, for better, for 

^"Nevertheless the foundation of God 
standeth sure, having this seal — The Lord 
knoweth them that are His, and, let everyone 
that nameth the name of Christ depart from 
iniquity." Tim. 2:19. 



worse, for richer, or poorer, in sickness 
and in health, until death do us part.' r 
She has "named the name" of John. The 
thread of her life has slipped out of the 
web of her father's home and is woven 
into a new web. Her father is no longer 
responsible for her bills. Her husband 
is. She is no longer responsible for do- 
ing service in her father's house. Her 
whole relation to civilization is changed. 
She has "named the name" of a man. 
Christ is the Bridegroom. "Let him that 
nameth the name of Christ depart from 
all unrighteousness." The keeping of 
company when the girl was at home, with 
this man or that, was well enough, but 
the keeping of company when one has 
"named a name" leads to bitter conse- 
quences. The young lady may go to the 
theatre, or the dance, or the opera three 
nights a week for three months with a 
dozen different men. She is the daughter 
of a man now. But when she becomes 
the wife of a man. standards change. 
And she can no longer spend her three 
nights a week out at the opera and the- 
atre and dance with this man and that. 
She has "named a name." There are 
very few things that are sins "per se." 
There are many things that are sins "per 
thee." Relation changes the character 
of the act. Things that you could do 
without rebuke of conscience or com- 
ment before you have "named the name'* 
of Christ become absolutely wrong when 
you ha\ r e named the name of Christ. 

A girl came from the mountains of 
Moab many . centuries ago. giving her 
strength and life to her aged mother-in- 
law. She settled in Bethlehem in Judea, 
where her mother-in-law was born and 
reared. In the morning she went to the 
fields of Boaz to glean, and Boaz seeing 
her, asked her who she was — found that 
she was the daughter-in-law of Xaomi, 
and said to his men, "Scatter the heads 
her her," and that night she had her 
apron filled, and a little while after that 
Boaz sat in the gates of the city and 
claimed her, and no one objected. He 
took the bankrupt estates, and she 
"named the name" of Boaz. He never 
sent her to glean as his wife. He made 
her mistress of his home. She "depart- 
ed" from the grain fields. "Let him that 
nameth the name depart from iniquity" 
and from all unrighteousness. 



36 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



lime, 1912 



Blessed Are They That Hunger and Thirst. 
The taking of the life of Christ must 
perforce bring- new standards. If it 
doesn't, you haven't the life. And if 
you don't meet the standards you can't 
keep_ the life. We complain because so 
many thousands of men and women 
come to us from beyond the sea with 
their strange standards of living. They 
have been beaten down into the soil by 
poverty and all the cells of life ha^ e been 
searched and drawn out by advertise- 
ment and shipped across the Atlantic, 
and they bring their old standards with 
them, and we complain and say that they 
ought not to live like that in a country 
like this, ought not to herd like cattle — 
ought to live like Americans. It takes 
education to fit new standards but if 
there is no answering ambition, no an- 
swering longing, why, no amount of edu- 
cation will work the change. If the idea 
of the man who comes here is to work 
here for three or five years at double 
wage and live on the old scale and then 
take what he has made and go back again 
and spend his life, you can't change his 
standard, but it isn't thinkable in a 
Christian man. and that is what be- 
wilders the whole problem of the Chris- 
tian world today — that we have our 
churches filled with men and women who 
have brought the standards of the world 
into the church and they have not de- 
parted from iniquity and unrighteous- 
ness, and when you deal with them in 
business you have got to be as careful 
as if they had never named the name of 
Christ. Their word isn't worth any- 
thing, and that is what bewilders the 
preacher of righteousness — that the 
trained army has not learned to keep step 
with the music of the eternal, and it is 
no proof you will have a square deal be- 
cause you are dealing with the deacon of 
a church. It is no proof that a man is 
absolutely pure in his relation when he 
is a thousand miles away from home be- 
cause he is a member of a church. That 
is what bewilders the preacher of right- 
eousness, but the foundation of God 
standeth sure.'' God knows and, if He 
knows that you belong to Him, He will 
have given you a new standard and you 
will depart from what you know to be 
unrighteousness, and what is unright- 
eousness in another man in dealing with 



you is unrighteousness in you in your 
dealing with another man. Put your- 
self in his place. If he were wise 
and you were ignorant, would you 
expect him, as a Christian man, to 
take advantage of your ignorance? If 
you are wise and he is ignorant can you, 
as a Christian man take, advantage of his 
ignorance? Can you tell as you enter 
the social swim which men and women 
are Christians and which are not ? Can 
you tell, as you throng the theatre and 
opera and sit by the bridge table which 
are Christian and which are not, in the 
enjoyment they find and in the tricks 
they play? 

"Loyalty, Loyalty." 

Victories are won, not by planning 
campaigns, but by fighting armies, and 
the fighting army that isn't loyal to its 
colors simply wrecks the campaign. "Let 
him that nameth the name of Christ de- 
part from unrighteousness." If I have 
a tree and make a slit up here near the 
top and insert a graft, I have a perfect 
right to expect that all the sap that 
passes the threshold of that graft will 
take the character of the sap of the graft 
and bear fruit of the grafted and not 
the ungrafted part of the tree. And we 
are grafted into Christ and the Lord has 
a right to look for the fruit that will bear 
the sap of the Word of God. 

Down in the North End is an Italian 
family. The oldest daughter is a remark- 
ably bright girl. Some friends, after 
she had joined one of the churches of 
the city, met to help her to an education. 
She wanted to go into Christian work. 
She came back from school at the Christ- 
mas vacation and the father and mother 
and boys and girls and the uncles and the 
aunts and the cousins all crowded in. 
Oh, they were proud of her! Beautiful 
girl — bright, intelligent, winsome — and 
at the table her uncle arose and took a 
glass of wine, handed it to her and said, 
"A pledge," and she said, "I don't care 
for it." "Oh, but you must drink it. 
You needn't think because you are going 
away to school you are better than vour 
betters here. That is the tradition of our 
house — the custom of our country. 
Come, drink." 

"I have seen enough of it in my own 
family, uncle. I don't care to drink." 



June. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



37 



Then a clamor arose on every side. 
"But that is the Italian custom. That 
is the way you were brought up. Just 
because you are going away to school do 
you think you are better than your par- 
ents ?" Then the uncle drew out a ten- 
dollar bill and said, "Take that and 
drink.*' She said. "No." Then he took 
a five-dollar bill and laid on top of it and 
said, "Now, take it and drink." and she 
said. "You haven't money enough to buy 
me! I shall not drink." 

The new standards. What do you 
think would happen in this republic if 
for one twelve months everybody — every 
member of every Christian church would 
live up to Christ's standard like that? 
God knows. The only way the world 
knows is when you do God's will by de- 
parting from iniquity. 

— Watchword and Truth. 



many deluded devotees of the secret 
superstition imagine it to be "A good 



enough religion." 



IMITATIVE CULTS. 

A striking editorial in a leading relig- 
ious journal, avers that "No age of the 
Christian era has ever seen so many im- 
itations of Christianity as exist to-day. 
In former centuries there were plenty 
of religious systems opposed to Chris- 
tianity, and but few imitators. But 
the peril to Christianity to-day lies not in 
its opposers. but in those who adopt 
some features of Christianity, and may 
even take its name, but lack its essential 
spirit and deny its power. There is a 
good reason for this. The religion of 
Jesus Christ' is to-day. from a worldly 
point of view, better worth imitating 
than ever before. It has established it- 
self impregnably in all the leading na- 
tions of the earth. Its principles rule the 
courts of the world, and it is hopeless 
to attempt its overthrow. The most that 
can be done is to corrupt its principles, 
traduce its name, and weaken its power. 
The most insidious and injurious method 
of attacking Christianity to-day, is to 
adopt some of its most attractive fea- 
tures and dispense with its most central 
and vital principle." 

The article of which the foregoing is 
part, makes no mention of the orders 
whose favorite claim is that they are 
"founded on the Bible." They are. how- 
ever, not safely distant from the line 
along which this shot is aimed. Too 



THE WORLD CURRENTS. 

That really brilliant monthly magazine. 
Missions, gives its first page in the March 
number the above heading, and we copy 
part of what is says : 

"The visit of King-Emperor George V 
to India has had apparently soothing 
effects upon the subject peoples, and will 
add new prestige to Great Britain's rule. 
The United States, by the way, has had 
the touch of a royal foot, for the Duke 
of Connaught, Governor General of Can- 
ada, with his wife and daughter Patricia 
paid a visit to Xew York as the guest of 
Ambassador Reid. and also to Washing- 
ton, where President Taft gave him wel- 
come. The Duke was so pleased that he 
said he should advise his sovereign 
nephew to include this country in his 
American tour, which is in contempla-. 
tion. What with our 'princes of the 
church' and all. we shall soon be quite 
used to royalty in democratic America. 

"Ecclesiastically, the world currents 
of Roman Catholicism set toward this 
country with open aggressiveness and as- 
surance. The only answer that can pre- 
serve our priceless religious liberties is a 
united and spiritually aggressive Protes- 
tantism, zealous of good works and keen- 
ly alert -to ward off all encroachments of 
Church upon State, through congrc — 
al and legislative lobbies, a controlled 
vote, or otherwise. 

"While no man in the United States 
should be discriminated against on ac- 
count of his religion, neither should he 
be favored or put in office on that ac- 
count. The rule should apply equally in 
both cases." 

This statement of "The only answer 
that can preserve our priceless religious 
liberities" gives little space to boastful 
masonry as a night watchman. It is 
verified by the salient historical fact that 
separation of church and state did not 
begin with the state and so include the 
church, but with toilsome and painful 
steps pushed its resisted way from 
church to state. It was religion that 
broke the iron link. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 191: 



dt 


g&mvitl §. (&tttnt ' 


<£ 



From the personal reminiscences by Samuel D. Greene of the abduction and mur- 
der of Captain William Morgan were taken some of the facts so vividly brought out in 
Miss Flagg's "Power of the Secret Empire," which ended in the December number of 
the CYNOSURE. The story has created so wide an interest that we propose to give our 
readers in the next few months some of these facts as recorded by Mr. Greene, an eye- 
witness. — Editor. 



CHAPTER VII. 
What Became of Morgan. 

The sudden disappearance of Morgan, 
under circumstances such as have been 
detailed, was the universal topic of con- 
versation in all that region of country. 
His wife and more immediate friends 
and acquaintances were thrown into a 
state of painful suspense. The public 
mind was full of wonder and curiosity. 
Hardly anything else was talked about. 
Day after day passed away, and noth- 
ing could, with any certainty, be ascer- 
tained respecting his fate. Rumors 
would come in from one quarter and an- 
other, some of no account, and others 
with a measure of truth. Snatches of in- 
telligence were all that, for a long time, 
came to hand. 

The agent who was despatched from 
Batavia to Canandaigua came back, 
bringing such depositions as that of Mrs. 
Hall, wife of the jailer, of which we have 
given a portion. These showed clearly 
enough what had been done at Canandai- 
gua, and the facts were sufficiently alarm- 
ing. On the 4th of October a committee 
of ten of the citizens of Batavia issued 
the following address to the public : 

"On the 11th day of September, William 
Morgan, a native of Virginia, who had for 
about three years past resided in this village, 
was, under pretext of a justice's warrant, hur- 
ried from his home and family, and carried to 
Canandaigua. The same night he was ex- 
amined on the charge of petit larceny, and dis- 
charged by the justice. One of the persons 
who took him away immediately obtained a 
warrant against him in a civil suit, for an al- 
leged debt of two dollars, on which he was 
committed to the jail of Ontario County. On 
the night of the 12th of September he was 
released by a person pretending to be his 
friend; but directly in front of the jail, not- 



withstanding his cries of murder, he was. 
gagged and secured, and put into a carriage, 
and, after traveling all night, he was left (as 
the driver of the carriage says) at Hanford's 
Landing, about sunrise on the 13th, since which 
he has not been heard of. His distressed wife 
and two infant children are left dependent 
on charity for their sustenance. The circum- 
stances of the transaction have given rise to 
the most violent fears that he has been' mur- 
dered. It is, however, hoped by his wife and 
friends that he may be kept concealed and 
imprisoned in Canada. All persons who are 
willing to serve the cause of humanity, and 
assist to remove the distressing apprehen- 
sions of his unfortunate wife, are earnestly 
requested to communicate to one of the com- 
mittee named below, directed to this place, 
any facts or circumstances which have come 
to their knowledge, and are calculated to lead 
to the discovery of his present situation, or 
the particulars of his fate, if he has been 
murdered. 

"Batavia, October 4, 1826." 

(Here follow the names of the committee 
of ten. ) 

"N. B. — It is hoped that printers throughout 
the State, Canada, and elsewhere, will give 
the above a few insertions, and thus serve the 
cause of justice and humanity." 

It should be said in passing, that very 
few printers had the moral courage to 
print the above notice, so completely 
were they in bondage to masonry. 

A call like this, issued from the village 
of Batavia, three weeks after Morgan's 
disappearance, shows how painful must 
have been the suspense to those most 
nearly concerned, and how carefully the 
abductors had taken pains to leave no 
clear and definite traces behind them. For 
many weeks, indeed, everything was ob- 
scure and indefinite. Hopes were en- 
tertained that he would appear again — 



June. L912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



W 




CAPT. WILLIAM MORGAN. 

that he was kept somewhere in prison 
until his book could be effectually sup- 
pressed, and then he would be set at 
large. But after a time, and little by 
little, the remarks which were dropped 
by leading men among the Masons dis- 
sipated all hopes that he would ever be 
seen alive. It became more and more 
apparent that this thing had not been 
done in a corner ; that a very large num- 
ber of persons, far and wide, had been 
cognizant of the transactions ; and their 
manner of talk about them was often 
of the most shameful character. It was a 
great subject of coarse joking among the 
Masons in their common conversation in 
the street, but especially in their lodge 
meetings. The efforts that were made, 
the measures that were taken to discover 
where he was, began to be a matter for 
ridicule and laughter, and even the dis- 
tress of his wife were joked about in 
public places. 

I was still a Mason, be it remember- 
ed, in form and kept up my connection 
with the lodge meetings. I felt confident 
that by the information I had communi- 
cated to Harris, and by the agency I 
had put forth. I had saved the life of 



Miller, and the same, in my opinion, 
would have been true of Morgan, if my 
testimony had been more implicitly be- 
lieved and acted upon. I tried to per- 
suade Captain Davids to do for Morgan 
what Mr. Cochrane and his neighbors 
had done for Miller, and if those most 
nearly concerned had not been incredu- 
lous and remiss, they would have roused 
the village of Batavia, and obtained a 
band of men to follow on and see that 
no harm was done to Morgan. But not- 
withstanding the part I had played in 
these transactions, I was still a Mason, 
in good and regular standing. Some 
might suspect me not to be true to my 
oaths ; but my secret was not yet out. I 
-till attended the lodge meetings, for I 
could not very well do otherwise, just 
now. There I heard enough, after a lit- 
tle time, to convince me that Morgan 
was no longer in the land of the living. 
It was just as well understood by the 
members of our lodge that Morgan was 
dead, as it is when our families attend 
the funeral of any person and return to 
tell the news, only the Masons did not 
make the announcement in the same 
way. They had a great deal of rough 
joking over the subject, implying that he 
was drowned somewhere in the direc- 
tion of Canada. They would say of 
the men who had him in charge, "They 
caught a bass the other night ;" or, "Mor- 
gan was taken out in a boat, a stone 
was fastened to him, and the wind blew, 
and the unfortunate wretch was blown 
overboard and sunk;" or they would di- 
versify the narrative by other fancy 
sketches of the same general character. 
It was perfectly apparent that the lead- 
ing men among the Masons, all abroad 
through the region, understood well that 
Morgan had been put out of the way. If 
I never had any other evidence that Mor- 
gan was murdered except what I had 
then and there from the mouths of Ma- 
sons, it would have been enough. 

The facts of the case, as they'after- 
wards gradually came to light, and 
formed themselves into a continuous 
story, were these. Morgan was taken 
out of the jail at Canandaigna, on the 
night of the 12th of September I Tues- 
day), in the manner already described. 
He was bound and gagged to prevent his 
outcries, and then conveyed one hundred 
and twenty miles by stage, through the 



40 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1912' 



towns and villages of Western New 
York, along a much-traveled road, to the 
United States fort at Niagara. He 
reached this place in the early morning 
of Thursday, September 14. having been 
continuously on the road, with such 
short interruptions as are incidental to a 
journey of this kind (changing horses, 
drivers, etc.), from Tuesday evening till 
this time. It had been a part of the gen- 
eral plan in the disposition to be made 
of Morgan, that he should be handed 
over to Brant, the Mohawk chief, and 
the Canadian Masons, and that they 
should despatch him. Accordingly, on 
the 14th of September, as soon as pos- 
sible after reaching the fort, he was 
taken out and carried across the river, to 
be given up to the Canadians. But they 
would not receive him. They were shy 
of staining their hands with this bloody 
business. When the thing was looked 
at afar off, their masonic zeal doubtless 
prompted them to say Yes to the propo- 
sition, but when the time for execution 
came their courage failed them. 

That Morgan was taken to the fort, 
then carried across the river and brought 
back, was told me as a positive fact by 
a minister (a Mason), who was per- 
sonally cognizant of it. He said that he 
went directly from the installation of 
the lodge at Lewiston (only a few miles 
off » to the fort, and saw Morgan taken 
out and carried across the river. Though 
a minister, this man was such a thor- 
oughgoing Mason, that when he told me 
this (he was talking to a Mason), he 
contended that, under the circumstances, 
it was right and proper to take Morgan's 
life. I also received this information 
from a deacon, who told me that he vis- 
ited Morgan while in the dark hole (he 
was placer! in the magazine of the fort), 
and there heard him asked what death 
he would prefer to die. He answered, 
"That he should prefer to die like a sol- 
dier ; that he had fought for his country, 
and as a soldier he would die for his 
countrv." This same deacon told me 
that Morgan asked for a light and for a 
Bible, that he might prepare his mind 
for his departure. But this request was 
refused, and the deacon said he thought 
if any man ought to be denied the Bible 
in such circumstances, Morgan was the 
man. 

(To be continued.) 



SECTARIANISM IN SCHOOLS. 

Indian Commissioner Valentine lately 
issued an order requiring Roman Catho- 
lic teachers in government schools for 
Indians to conform to the law forbid- 
ding sectarian influence. The garb of 
teachers was regarded as an influence in- 
consistent with true separation* of church 
and state, or at least inconsistent with 
law applying to those schools. Catholics 
having protested, the order was suspend- 
ed pending investigation or hearing. At 
the hearing were representatives of 
Protestantism and Americanism, as well 
as representatives of Romanism. A mas- 
terly review of law, principle, and fact, 
was made by the commissioner. Others 
spoke on both sides of the question relat- 
ing to the suspended order. 

Secretary Fisher, who presided at the 
hearing, gave so far as possible a full 
hearing of all phases, of the subject. 
Among many pertinent questions which 
he himself asked, was one inquiring 
whether the representatives of the Ro- 
man Catholic church would object to 
having teachers who wore while on duty 
such masonic emblems as watch fobs, 
rings, etc. They replied that they would 
not. An editor, taking this up, continues : 

If the principal of one of the Indian- 
schools were a Masonic Knight, we may ask, 
and were always to wear, while on duty, his 
hat with its plume, the Masonic apron with its 
insignia, his knightly sword, in short, such 
complete panoply of his order that the minds 
of children, especially susceptible to object- 
lesson teaching — children of Indians who are 
accustomed to indicate ideas mainly by sign 
language — is there any doubt that an outcry 
would be raised by the Roman church from 
end to end of the land? Whenever the garb 
is so complete and conspicuous, as in the case 
wearer except with the garb, the better the 
wearer may be in character, and the more 
of nuns and friars, that there is no seeing the 
efficient as a teacher, the more complete and 
inevitable is the result of that kind of sec- 
tarisn propaganda. 

There is an obvious purpose to make 
the Indian school so far as possible a 
parochial school without regard to law, 
public policy, or the wishes of the parents 
of Indian children. Romanism is or- 
ganized for efficient political activity; 
Protestantism is not politically organized, 
and perhaps needs political organization 
less than intensified evangelistic activity. 
Through this it can exert power defend- 
ing American laws and institutions from 
the disintegrating aggressions of Mor- 
monism, Masonry and Romanism. 



June, 1912 



CHRISTIAN CYXOSURE. 



11 



The National Meeting and Convention 



We go to press before the close of the 
annual meeting - , the reports of which 
must wait until the next number of the 
Cynosure. The encouragement which the 
officers of the association receive from 
the letters of members is not the least of 
the benefits of our annual gathering. We 
are certain that they will prove a tonic 
to every worker and we hasten to give 
the first installment in this number. 



CHURCH AND LABOR LODGE. 
President C. A. Blanchard. 

[Synopsis of address given at the National 
Convention, May 24th, in the Second United 
Presbyterian Church, Chicago. — Editor.] 

I do not need to say to you that this 
is one of the burning questions of the 
day. There is no one thing which has 
popularized the secret society movement 
in our time more rapidly than the labor 
lodge movement. The working men of 
our nation have been yoked to the secret 
society car and are dragging it forward 
as rapidly as possible. It is difficult if 
not impossible to discuss the question 
calmly and in a kindly spirit. The mem- 
bers of these labor lodges are swift to 
charge those who disapprove of them 
with all sorts of evil motives and inten- 
tions. They seem to require men to 
approve of their orders or to be consid- 
ered and treated as enemies of the labor- 
ing men. Over and again we are told 
that the churches are the servants of the 
rich and tliat they are enemies of the 
poor. That there is some excuse for 
this' sort of talk no thoughtful man can 
deny. At the same time that it is es- 
sentially untrue we believe all men who 
think things through must eventually 
conclude, but whether true or untrue, 
it is certain that the subject is one which 
ought to be calmly and deliberately dealt 
with until some sort of an approximation 
to the truth can be attained. I desire, 
therefore, this evening as a Christian and 



an American man to raise with you this 
question, WYhat should be the attitude 
of the Christian church regarding the 
labor lodge ?" 

Is the labor lodge really a friend to 
the laboring man and must the church 
commend it or be considered an enemy 
to the wage earner? I shall discuss this 
question without any heat and at the 
same time I shall try to discuss it hon- 
estly and fully. I will not deal in half 
truths for the sake of avoiding unfound- 
ed accusations of partisanship. I pro- 
fess to be a free seeker after truth. I 
have not an opinion on any subject what- 
ever which I would not instantly sur- 
render if satisfied that it was mistaken 
or untrue. Personally I should very 
much rather keep silence regarding the 
labor lodges than to speak about them. 
It is always pleasanter to make friends 
than to make enemies, and while some 
persons might think me cowardly if I 
neglected to bear my share in the discus- 
sion of any question of public interest, 
every intelligent person knows that the 
risks of offending men are far greater 
when you speak against an institution 
or even criticize it than when you keep 
silence concerning it. I shall, therefore, 
as faithfully, kindly and thoroughly as 
I can examine the question proposed, 
and first I remark, that 

The Labor Lodge Injures the Laboring 
Man 

as a man. First or last every man is 
rated at his true value. He will be con- 
sidered the sort of a person he actually 
is. There is no way in which to attain 
permanent success by cunning or dis- 
honesty; the thief must be known as a 
thief, the liar as a liar, the lazy man as 
a lazy man, a dishonest man as a dishon- 
est man. Lincoln said, "You can fool 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1912 



some of the people all the time, and all 
the people some of the time, but you 
cannot fool all of the people all of the 
time." To which I desire to add the 
statement that you cannot fool God any 
of the time. Now what is the natural 
effect of the labor lodge on the laboring- 
man ? I mean as a man. Does it make 
him a better worker, more efficient, more 
enterprising, more tireless, more patient, 
more successful or not? Two or three 
principles of the labor lodges are in- 
volved in the answer to this question. 

In the first place, laboring lodges have 
until now demanded the same rate of 
pay for all members of the lodge. The 
industrious and enterprising, the careless 
and idle, the blundering and injurious 
ones, if they are on the rolls of the lodge, 
are to be paid the same wage for the 
same time. No man who can put two 
ideas together and draw a conclusion 
from them needs to be told what the ef- 
fect of such a principle as this must be. 
It will render the blunderer, the lazy 
man, the worthless worker satisfied and 
happy. He will make no effort to im- 
prove because he receives the rewards 
of labor and knowledge and thought for 
carelessness, inattention and idleness. He 
will remain the sort of a person he nat- 
urally is. On the other hand the man 
who is naturally industrious, careful, en- 
terprising and successful will be discour- 
aged and irritated. Every day he will 
see his inferiors compensated exactly as 
he is and a man must be more than 
human to witness this going forward day 
after day without being affected by it. 
Men naturally believe that industry, in- 
telligence and enterprise ought to be re- 
warded. If they find that they are not, 
naturally, instinctively, inevitably they 
say, "What is the use?" We may find 
fault with them if we like, but they 
will say it all the same. Personally I do 
not have any reason to find fault with 
them. I think I should say this myself. 



So we find that this first principle of 
the labor lodge operates to keep the lazy 
and worthless, worthless and lazy, and 
to discourage, dishearten and deteriorate 
men of the higher type. 
A Wrong to One Is the Concern of All. 
This principle translated into the lodge 
language is simply, if one member of 
the union is discharged the other mem- 
bers of the union will strike, and this 
principle has a special relation to the 
subject we have just left. 

No employer wishes to continue in his 
service men who are an injury to his 
business. A lazy, worthless, careless 
workman is of course an injury. His 
work is unsatisfactory, he destroys ma- 
chines, he infects other workmen and as 
soon as an employer knows that he has 
a man of this type on his pay roll he 
naturally wishes to get rid of him, but 
if he discharges him the workmen all 
strike, The inevitable effect is to em- 
bolden the idle and worthless, the incom- 
petent and injurious to maintain their 
evil and harmful ways. They do not 
feel that they stand alone. If they choose 
to break valuable machines or to destrov 
valuable material the union is understood 
to be pledged to their protection. They 
cannot be dismissed without trouble for 
the employer, for "an injury to one is 
the concern of all." 

A further injury to the workmen is 
wrought in the limitation of production. 
This is not an unnatural but it is an ex- 
tremely injurious situation. The labor 
lodge says, "If twelve men work side by 
side, three are fast, three are moderately 
fast and six are slow. The fast men will 
turn off more work, will be more highly 
valued by their employers and will nat- 
urally receive the higher wage, but this 
will be an injury to the slow or the idle, 
so the fast worker must dawdle over his 
work or cut short his time. He must 
do as much as the slow or idle man will 
do and must not do any more, lay as 



June, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



id 



many brick, wash as many joints or nail 
as many boxes as the careless, indiffer- 
ent or idle man can lay or wash or nail. 
This is a forced contribution levied on 
the employer for the benefit of the in- 
ferior workman. The fast man does not 
take something out of his own wages 
and give to the slow, he cuts down his 
work and compels his employer to pay 
him and the slow man both a good wage 
for inferior labor. 

Any one familiar with labor lodge 
movements in our time knows that this 
is true. We have ourselves seen men 
idling away their time, sometimes openly 
and shamelessly, sometimes making a 
false pretense of labor, but all the time 
arranging to accomplish as much work 
as the slow or lazy man will do and no 
more. Every man of course who does 
this is a mere grafter or, if you do not 
object to the plainer term, a thief. He 
is stealing from his employer, he is 
taking wages for work which he does 
not do, and aiding to compel his em- 
ployer to pay other men for work which 
they do not do. The effect on moral 
character, on social relations and on 
business life is evident. Such a state 
of things works but wrong wherever it 
goes and the longer it continues the 
worse it is. 

"You Cannot Have My Place." 

One of the singular effects connected 
with the labor lodge thinking is that men, 
who are not able to compel employers 
to pay for work which is not done and 
who strike because the employer does 
not choose to submit to their dictation, 
are not willing that the employer should 
secure other men to do the work which 
they refuse to perform. They say to the 
employer, "We will not do your work 
in your way and on your terms. We 
demand the privilege of doing it in our 
way and on our terms, and if you will 
not consent to this arrangement we will 
see to it that nobody else does this work 



which we refuse to do. The place in 
which we have been working is ours, not 
yours, and no man shall take this place 
of ours. We will not fill it and we will 
not allow any one else to fill it. We will 
compel you to allow it to remain vacant 
until you permit us to fill it on our own 
terms but you must furnish the money. 
You must take the risks. You must pay 
for our blunders and mistakes, if we 
make them. We will control the busi- 
ness and you must pay the bills." Stated 
in this plain and simple fashion it seems 
incredible that any sane person should 
ever make such a proposition, but it is 
not only made, it is insisted upon, and 
it is the law of the labor lodges through- 
out the world. 

Violence the Natural Result. 

When society is horrified by slugging 
and murder, men of the Gomper's type 
tell us that such actions are the work 
of the ignorant and debased members of 
the lodges, or that capitalists procure the 
violence to discredit the unions. They 
pretend that they have no sympathy with 
or share in them, yet anyone who under- 
stands the facts in the case can see be- 
fore he has examined the evidence that 
this pretense is a mere fraud. When a 
man lays down work which he has been 
doing, for which he has been receiving 
a wage and says, "No one else can do 
this work which I refuse to do," it is as 
natural for him to proceed to violence as 
it is for him to breathe. What he will 
do of course will depend upon the sort 
of a man he is. If he is one of the lead- 
ers such as planned the wholesale mur- 
ders of the Miners' Federation in the 
West, or the Iron Workers' Union in the 
East, he will cover his tracks and assist 
his tools and agents to do the murders. 

If he is a coarser, more ignorant per- 
son he will, with a company of men, wait 
until after dark and then jump out from 
some alley or unoccupied building to 
knock down, shoot or stab the person 



■M 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1912 



who is taking what he calls his place, or 
he will plant the explosive which his 
superiors have bought and put at his dis- 
posal. These are not strange and unex- 
pected occurrences, they are the every- 
day work of the labor lodge. They are 
not the work of labor lodges in cities 
merely, in small country places the same 
principles bear the same deadly fruit. 

The natural reaction from these vio- 
lent, murderous acts is violent and mur- 
derous resistance. If only the people who 
are to be slugged and killed could know 
in time, they would decline to be slugged 
and killed. They would arm themselves 
and resist to the death those who pro- 
pose to destroy them. That is to say, we 
should have a condition of social an- 
archy. This does not require argument, 
it lies on the surface. The only reason 
why we do not have war when labor 
unions get fairly to work is because labor 
unions work secretly and those who are 
to be injured by them do not know what 
is being done in time to protect them- 
selves. 

The Miners' Federation planted bombs 
under buildings, in gateways, wherever 
they pleased. Men by ones or twos or 
scores were blown into fragments when 
the explosives acted. In my own town 
within a year a union laborer passing 
along by a building where a non-union 
laborer was working on a ladder, pulled 
the ladder down and precipitated his fel- 
low workman to the ground. The only 
reason the workman was nc'. killed was 
because the providence of God protected 
him. He could as easily have broken 
his neck as received the bruises he re- 
ceived. This again, we repeat, is not the 
exceptional or the strange and unexpect- 
ed result of labor lodges, it is the natural 
and inevitable result. 

What About the Boys? 

The Juvenile Court is one of the new 
institutions of our time. Through these 
courts annually pass tens of thousands 



of boys who are arrested for petty crimes 
and misdemeanors. Under the old meth- 
od of dealing with theni they would have 
been sent to prison where, locked up with 
experienced criminals, they would have 
been trained for lives of crime. The 
modern method is infinitely superior to 
this but it is thoroughly heart breaking at 
its very best. 

I have myself sat in the Juvenile Court 
and seen a little lad nine or ten years 
of age clutching his mother's skirt and 
sob out as he was being sent away to 
some reform school or other, "Oh, mam- 
ma, please try me again, I will be good !" 
Now what is the matter with these boys ? 
In the first place, our nation allows liquor 
shops in which his father drinks up his 
daily or weekly wage. In the next place 
the mother goes out as a scrub woman 
or gets work in an office, or does some- 
thing which compels her to leave her 
children alone. In the third place, these 
children play on the streets and form 
such acquaintances and companionships 
as they can pick up. In the fourth place, 
sportively or with malicious intent they 
commit petty depredations. In the fifth 
place, they are sent to the parental school, 
the John Worthy, the Glenwood, the St. 
Charles or something or other. In the 
sixth place, when one of these little lads 
gets homesick and runs away to see his 
mother, he is caught, brought back, taken 
downstairs and whipped with a piece of 
hose or something else until he is wound- 
ed, bruised, broken-hearted and submits 
until the pressure of nature is too strong,, 
when he will run away again. 

Now in an age like this, with scores or 
thousands of boys starving body and soul 
for employment, what do the labor 
unions say about apprentices and an op- 
portunity for the boy to learn a trade 
and become a useful member of society ? 
Why, the labor lodges say that the boys 
can have no such opportunity without 



June, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



45 



their consent. A member of a labor 
union lodge dare not teach his trade to 
his own son. 

A wealthy man, a liberal employer of 
labor, said to me only a short time ago, 
nodding toward a room in the great 
building where I was, in which there 
were many machines which he had 
bought and for the running of which he 
was paying men, "I could not put my 
own brother to work in that room if I 
wanted to." He owned the building, he 
owned the machines, he paid the men 
who operated them and they told him 
how many boys might learn the trade or 
whether any boys might learn it at all. 
Thus the labor lodges are pushing thou- 
sands of lads, who, under the former or- 
ganization of industry would be learning 
valuable trades for the benefit of them- 
selves and society — I say they are push- 
ing these lads out into the street, compell- 
ing them to be vagabonds and ultimately 
criminals. 

What Has the Church to Do With All 
This? 
The church has everything to do with 
all this. It is the business of the church 
to conserve the interests of individuals 
and society. The church has no right 
to stand by in silence and see men 
destroyed. Whittier long ago said : 
"My voice, though not the strongest has 
been heard. 
Wherever freedom raised her cry of pain." 
, This should be the attitude not of one 
or two here or there, but the attitude of 
the Christian church throughout the 
world. The church has no right to be 
silent or inactive when freedom lifts her 
cry of pain. In our time the church, as 
already stated, is accused of being the 
servant of the rich and the enemy of 
the poor. If the church does not profit 
by the oppression of the poor she is de- 
clared to be indifferent to it. I am not 
here to say that these charges are entirely 
without foundation but I am here to say 
that if the church has erred in this par- 



ticular I am inclined to think she has 
erred more seriously and deeply by fail- 
ing to bear testimony against the vio- 
lence, the unsound economic principles, 
the personal and social wreck caused by 
labor lodges. 

Principles, Not Rules. 

No man has studied the Bible to much 
purpose who has not observed that in 
the Christian system the regeneration of 
individuals and society is attempted not 
by means of codes but by means of con- 
victions. Jesus Christ did not give a lot 
of arrangements for society; He estab- 
lished certain principles upon which men 
were to act, and it has been found that 
this method of changing the crooked- 
ness of human life is the one which ac- 
complishes the desired results. We have 
no reason to anticipate the success of 
any different method in our time. It is 
not by the denunciation of riches or pov- 
erty, by the criticism of one form of 
social organization or another, but by 
Christian teaching, that men are to be 
saved from the wreck and ruin caused 
by sin. That the simple teaching of the 
Lord Jesus honestly applied to the mis- 
eries of human society would heal and 
help, no man who has known the Chris- 
tian system doubts for one moment. It 
is, therefore, the duty of the church in 
this clay to protest and still to protest, 
to teach and still to teach the truth 
respecting labor lodges as respecting all 
other things. It is a dangerous state of 
society when anything is supposed to be 
superior to inquiry. "Prove all things, 
hold fast that which is good," is still the 
law in the Christian world and this law- 
obeyed, like all other laws obeyed, will 
bring harmony and help to our stormy 
and perplexed age. 

"Do you then believe that capitalists 
have no sins for which to account?" one 
may ask. Beyond doubt they have. Sel- 
fishness and indifference to the needs and 
rights of human beings with their re- 



46 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1912 



suiting misery and dehumanization may 
be justly charged against them. These 
sins and crimes must be accounted for. 
But one wrong does not make another 
wrong right. The sins of wealth are in- 
dividual, the power to right the wrongs 
which they cause is in the hands of the 
people. 

It does not help to pay good and evil 
alike, to shut our boys out of our shops 
and to train men to murder their fellow 
workmen. This has been tried and is a 
failure. It is time for wage earners 
everywhere to enroll in the army of 
justice and fair play. This the church 
should teach. 



LETTERS TO THE CONVENTION 



BISHOP MILTON WRIGHT. 

Father of the Wright Brothers, Aeronauts, 

and One of the First Corporate 

Members of the National 

Christian Association. 
Dayton, Ohio, May 7th, 1912. 
Before the time of your annual meet- 
ing I shall have passed the first six 
months of my eighty-fourth year of life. 
I do not expect again to be as far from 
home as Chicago. 

If life is spared I may in future give 
you my views. I have been a reader of 
the Cynosure from its first publication. 
Yours, 

Milton Wright. 



JAMES M. GRAY, D. D. 
Dean "Moody Bible Institute," Chicago. 
London, England, March 16, 19 12. 

My Dear Brother: I have yours of 
the 5th asking for "a word of testimony, 
experience or exhortation" to be read at 
your annual gathering. 

It is only a word of sympathy and en- 
couragement that I can send, but I do so 
from a sense of Christian duty, and that 
obligation of fellowship growing out of 
the contest in which we are mutually en- 
gaged as soldiers of the army of the 
Lord. "We wrestle not against flesh and 
blood." Your association is not oppos- 
ing men, but "the powers of darkness" 
that are blinding the eyes of some, and 
dangerously using others. 



It is the "good" men who are mixed 
up with some of the secret orders that 
give them their greatest opportunity 
against the truth. And these good men are 
there, I am convinced, because they do 
not know the whole counsel of God. The 
Bible is only known in. a very small part 
of it to most Christians. Those who eat 
and drink it, those who live in it, those 
who breathe its atmosphere continually 
are not found in the associations of 
which we speak. 

On the other hand, the opponents of 
the lodge system are not always Biblical 
in their standpoint, and by their argu- 
ments and methods sometimes antagon- 
ize where they might win. Satan uses 
these too. Oh, that your convention this 
' year might be a time of spiritual awaken- 
ing that would renew every member of 
it in the Lord. Cordially yours, 

James M. Gray. 



REV. L. G. ALMEN. 
Pastor Zion Lutheran Church. 

Carthage, S. D., May 11, 1912. 
Wm. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111., 

Reverend and dear Brother: Grace 
and peace be with you ! I herewith in- 
close check for $2 — $1 as subscription to 
the Cynosure and $1 to the National 
Christian Association. I wish very much 
that I were able to give more to the great 
and noble work which your association is 
carrying on year after year without 
growing weary. It certainly deserves the 
hearty support, financial as well as moral, 
of every Christian in our land, both on 
account of its high and sacred aim of re- 
vealing and destroying the work of dark- 
ness in the secret orders, and because the 
Prince of darkness is so powerful and 
well fortified in said organizations. 

It would seem that the courageous and 
gigantic undertaking of your association 
attacking Satan in his strongest entrench- 
ment would prove of no avail, but I have 
noticed to my heart's satisfaction that 
your brave captains have led your forces 
on to victory in many places ; and I am 
glad and thankful to the Lord of Hosts 
that your little army of heroes is steadily 
growing in members, and is being more 
thoroughly drilled and better equipped 
than ever before. But nevertheless, we 
need to petition our great General in 






June, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Chief to call out strong auxiliaries from 
every state in the Union. If every Chris- 
tian would join our army of light against 
the Prince of darkness, his stronghold 
would soon be conquered. May the Lord 
hasten that day and may your annual 
convention result in extending the work 
and increasing its blessed influence to the 
utmost borders of our great country. 
This is the hearty wish and prayer of 
Yours in Christ, 

L. G. Almen. 



PROF. ELLIOT WHIPPLE. 

Pasadena, Cal., April 25, 1912. 

I read the Cynosure each month with 
unabated interest, and congratulate the 
association on the excellence of its organ. 

The last issue of the Dartmouth Col- 
lege Alumni paper, commenting on the 
fact that most of the students dropped 
for poor scholarship were members of 
the "fraternities," goes on to deplore va- 
rious injurious influences exerted by the 
Greek letter societies, such as control of 
college politics, diminishing of interest in 
studies and in literary society work, in- 
tensifying of the clannish feeling, etc, 
The writer apparently has reached the 
stage in which he sees "men as trees, 
walking." 

Secret societies dominate about every- 
thing here, but there are some who have 
eyes to see. 

With esteem, 

Elliot Whipple. 



PRESIDENT N. E. BYERS. 
Goshen (Mennonite) College. 
Goshen, Ind., May 10, 1912. 
It is my opinion that the secret Lodge 
is ' a detriment to the best interests of 
any individual Christian and a great hin- 
drance to the work of the Church. The 
purpose of the Lodge and the spirit of 
the prevailing life are not in harmony 
with the Christian Church, and all the 
good that the Lodge aims at or accom- 
plishes ought to be provided for by the 
Church, which would eliminate the evils. 
Since the Lodge provides social asso- 
ciations and charitable aid. it satisfies 
many men and, for them, becomes a sub- 
stitute for the Church. 

Yours truly, 

N. E. Byers. 



MR. JOSEPH P. SHAW. 
Auditor for National Christian Association. 

Wheaton, 111., May 11, 1912. 

It gives me pleasure to be of service to 
the men who make the N. C. A. an influ- 
ence for good in this world, though there 
be not much remuneration in it. 

The principles for which the X. C. A. 
stands will never be popular because the 
tendency of the world is directly oppo- 
site to them, or another way of putting it 
is because they antagonize the popular 
notions of men. That, however, is the 
salt in the National Christian Associa- 
tion. 

I trust that the annual meeting may be 
a great success. God bless the X. C. A. 
and make it a still greater power for 
good. Verv sincerely yours, 

T. P. Shaw. 



B. E. BERGESEN. 
Pastor Zion Norwegian Lutheran Church. 

Seattle, Wash. 

Brethren : I greet your convention 
with best wishes for God's blessing. I 
miss these testifying conventions which 
for 20 years I attended in Chicago and 
X T ew England. To illustrate "the tie 
that binds'' I will tell you of an incident 
that happened yesterday. A Reformed 
Presbyterian called me up over the 'phone 
saying, "I read in the Cynosure about 
your lecture against secret societies : let's 
get together and see what we can do here 
in Seattle ! I thought I stood alone here." 

I answered : "Don't you think it for a 
minute ; we Lutheran pastors are with 
you." 

Yours in the cause of Christ. 

B. E. Bergesex. 



REV. DAVID S. FARIS. 

Sparta, 111., April 4, 1912. 

My heart is with you, and my prayers 
are for the cause the association urges. 1 
believe it will prevail. But the lodge will 
go to seed first: secret societies will mul- 
tiply until the lodge system breaks down 
of its own weight. It surely draws near 
this condition when school children go 
about organizing with as much zeal and 
blasphemy as their parents. 

I wonder that evangelical Christians 
can be so presumptuous as to pretend to 
go to the Father and not in the name of 



48 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1912 



Christ. It is' shocking to read of the 
mummeries of masonry at the funeral of 
James A. O" Conner, the converted priest. 
He was so earnest in rejecting the des- 
potism of the Pope, yet could swallow the 
blasphemous oaths and Christless cere- 
monies of the masonic lodge. O'Conner 
had a kindly feeling to the Masons be- 
cause they helped to put down the Pope 
in France. I have no use for either. If 
God pleases to use the Masons as a force 
to destroy popery He will do so. It is 
His divine right to use His enemies so 
that they shall dash each other in pieces. 
God has use for wicked men and nations 
as instruments of punishment to overturn 
the kingdom of Satan. He has better 
work for the Church, viz : to bear testi- 
mony for the truth, but the wicked pow- 
ers of the world are the battering rams 
in His hands to demolish the kingdom of 
Satan. 

I expect to keep in touch with the 
cause through the Cynosure. I am 
reading with much interest the old rec- 
ords of the Morgan abduction and mur- 
der. 

Yours very truly in the cause of Christ, 
David S. Farts. 



REV. E. Y. WOOLLEY. 
Assistant Pastor The Moody Church. 
Chicago, April 5, 19 12. 
Mr. W. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother Phillips : Your valued 
favor of the 30th at hand. The National 
Christian Association has been a real 
blessing to my life, for it was through 
one of its conventions that I was led into 
the light and to see that I was grieving 
the Holy Spirit by yoking up with un- 
believers in the lodges. I praise God I 
came out. It was one of the hardest 
things God ever asked me to do, but 
there has never been a moment since it 
was done that I have regretted it. 

Many ministers on a wrong exposition 
of being "all things to all men," join the 
lodge with a view to getting the members 
to Christ, but I never knew it to work. 
One such minister near the close of a 
long life told me that the men who had 
caused him the most trouble in the 
church were his fellow lodge members. 
"The natural man discerneth not the 
things of the Spirit."" "Being silent or 



compromising on the lodge question in 
order to get and keep men in the church 
is unnecessary, if the Moody Church be 
any criterion. It has always taken an 
open stand against all secret, oath-bound 
societies and yet perhaps it has the larg- 
est congregations of any regular Protes- 
tant church in the city of Chicago, and 
these congregations are many times com- 
posed of more men than women. 
Yours with best regards, 

E. Y. Wooley. 



REV, L. V. HARRELL. 
Pastor United Brethren (Radical) Church. 
South Haven, Mich., March 13, 191 2. 

I am in a big revival here on my 
charge. This revival began over three 
weeks ago and I do not know when it will 
close. The church has been greatly 
strengthened and encouraged. 

Some of my people were somewhat 
fearful that my preaching against the 
lodges would drive the people away and 
prevent the success of the meeting, but 
they have gotten over that now. I am 
trying to deal fairly with the lodge peo- » 
pie, but there is no dodging around the 
stumps, no compromise with the devil 
and no uncertain sound to the gospel 
trumpet in this revival. 

I am gratified to see so many of the 
young people take a stand for the right. 
While lodge men and women have been 
out of sorts at the preaching, their chil- 
dren have come forward and given their 
hearts to Christ. 

In closing I want to praise God for the 
fact that a minister can be a true man 
and do his duty in exposing and de- 
nouncing sin and yet be successful in the 
winning of souls to Christ, and in the 
management of the affairs of the church. 
Your brother, 

L. V. Harrell. 



REV. G. M. ROBB. 
Pastor Reformed Presbyterian Church. 

Almonte, Ont., Can., April 9, 1912. 
I regret that I cannot be with you, for 
I most heartily sympathize both with the 
aim and methods of the work. I have 
had a desire for a number of years to at- 
tend one of these annual meetings, but 
distance has prevented. 



1 



June, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



40 



We are maintaining a solitary testi- 
mony against the Secret Empire ; as far 
as I know, our congregation is the only 
one, within a radius of one hundred 
miles, that keeps the flag of freedom fly- 
ing. It seems to me, from my observa- 
tion, that more of the better class of peo- 
ple are ensnared by the lodge here in 
Canada than in the United States. How- 
ever, my residence here lias been only 
four years and my field of observation 
not very extensive, so that my opinion 
may be revised. 

Wishing you God's richest blessing on 
your meeting and the guidance of the 
Holy Spirit in all -your deliberations, I 
am, Sincerely yours, 

Geo. M. Roeb. 



REV, O. T. LEE. 

A Powerful Advocate in this. Christian 
Conflict. 

Northwood, Iowa, April g, 1912. 

The Synod for the Norwegian Evan- 
gelical Lutheran church of America has 
always taken a definite stand against se- 
cret societies. A paragraph is generally 
embodied in the constitution of every 
congregation that is accepted into the 
church body that no member of a secret 
society can become a member of the 
church. Another paragraph states that 
any member of a congregation that joins 
a lodge thereby loses his right to speak 
and vote at a congregational meeting. 
Such members will be admonished ac- 
cording to the word of God and if they 
continue in lodge idolatry they will be ex- 
pelled from the congregation. Of course 
there are congregations where church dis- 
cipline cannot be enforced as it is in 
others. 

At all our seminaries, colleges, acade- 
mies, in private schools, in catichetical in- 
struction, from the pulpit and in private, 
we teach that secret societies are detri- 
mental to state, church and home. 

These societies are proclaiming a reli- 
gion, but it is not the Christian religion. 
They have gone far into idolatry and are 
sinning against the first commandment of 
the decalogue 

Because we have the Savior who shed 
His blood for us, we cannot have any- 
thing to do with lodges which reject the 
Savior. We shall continue to bear testi- 
mony against these institutions that are 



trying to supplant the Church of Christ, 
and ask that the Lord will send men en- 
dowed with wisdom and courage to carry 
on this war against the powers of dark- 
ness. The Synod will do its share in this 
great struggle, and help to spread the 
light that can open the eyes of those who 
have been led into the snares of secret- 
ism. 

Yours in the battle, 

O. T. Lee. 



EVANGELIST WILLIAM S. JACOBY. 

Guthrie Center, Iowa, March 8, 19 12. 
Wm. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother : You ask for a word of 
testimony. As a young Christian at the 
age of forty-five, I wanted to please God, 
and was determined to put everything 
out of my life that would hinder me. He 
made it very clear to me that secret so- 
cieties were in my way, and He made it 
so plain that I could not help but see it. 

First, He showed me that the money I 
was paying into the lodges could be used 
in His service, and I was giving out quite 
a sum to the Blue Lodge, the Chapter, 
the Knights Templar, and the Knights 
of Pythias. 

Secondly, He showed me that I could 
not retain a spiritual life in fellowship 
with Him and continue in fellowship 
with ungodly men with whom I was un- 
der obligation to protect or hide their 
misdeeds. And what made me see this 
more clearly than anything else was one 
night when, in Lodge, we knelt in a 
circle with joined hands, and repeated 
the Lord's prayer, "Our Father." etc. 
The man next to me was one of the worst 
drunkards and libertines in the town. 
Mv, how I was condemned! And I said. 
"Father, if you will forgive me. I will 
never be caught in this way again." 

The third reason was that it occupied 
ni}' time evenings, when I might have 
been at home with my wife or at the mid- 
week prayer meeting. I found that some 
of our church members preferred the 
lodge to the prayer meeting. When I 
saw these things. I was more determined 
than ever to come out. The devil told me 
T would be ruined; that, as T lived in a 
little town, and there were a good many 
who belonged to the lodges," thev and 
their friends would drop "me; but God 
said: "I am able to take care of you." I 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1912 



came out. The next year my business 
increased a thousand dollars ; but, better 
still, my Christian life was richer, my joy 
fuller, my fellowship with Jesus sweeter. 
We cannot be unequally yoked with 
unbelievers and expect to have fellow- 
ship or power in our Christian lives. I 
feel like shouting "Hallelujah!" 
Yours very truly, 

W. S. Jacoby. 



i&ttonal 



This city was in the hands of union 
sluggers again last month. For many 
days it was dangerous to life and limb 
to sell or buy the daily papers except 
as protected by policemen. The great 
body of union labor did not sympathize 
with the small body of strikers who had 
broken their contracts with the news- 
papers. An outsider is impressed with 
the boldness and lawlessness of the 
small body of strikers and their sluggers, 
and with the lack of severity of the gov- 
ernment in dealing with such lawless- 
ness, and also with the supineness of the 
public. A young woman buys a daily 
and has it torn from her hands by a 
man ; a man buys a paper and is set upon 
by thugs and beaten; and each of the 
above and like cases were witnessed by a 
crowd of men not one of whom raised his 
voice in protest or rebuke. Such scenes 
were common in Chicago during a por- 
tion of last month, and their spirit is be- 
ing reduplicated by union carpenters in 
little suburbs of three thousand inhabit- 
ants like Wheaton. 

Such disturbances are not a pleasant 
prophecy of the future. 



NEXT STATION. 

When the brakeman comes into the 
car to make a noise with his mouth, ev- 
ery passenger knows he is thinking of 
some station ahead ; those already famil- 
iar with the road and aware what sta- 
tion it is, can tell what the brakeman 
thinks he is saying. Though passengers 
who disembark at the next station think 
they leave all the rest, every one who 
remains in the car thinks it is he who is 
leaving them behind. In doing this each 



regards himself free to 'choose without 
responsibility to the other or for the 
other. Yet nothing is easier than to 
think of an exception. In case a passen- 
ger coming so far merely to accompany 
a friend stopping here, dies in a wreck 
before reaching his own remote destina- 
tion, the friend will deplore influencing 
him to select this route. If he is obliged 
to reflect that he was aware that his 
own section of track was safest, and that 
entered later by his friend most danger- 
ous, his regret will be akin to remorse. 

For a long distance along the F. and 
A. M. line there always remains a next 
station. A good many who stop at the 
third one appear responsible for others 
who go beyond, though at the same time 
ignorant of the remainder of the trip. 
They thus assume responsibility which 
they do not understand. In no case 
creditable, this becomes more discredita- 
ble in the case of those who refuse to 
go farther themselves, or in any way be- 
tray distrust or suspicion when they cast 
a glance beyond. It must be noted here 
that as, when not yet Masons, they did 
not know the Blue Lodge degrees, so 
now they retain similar ignorance of the 
far greater number of degrees still re- 
maining. This colors the responsibility 
assumed for others who may happen to 
continue in the train as far as the Royal 
Arch or beyond. A Mason avoiding 
further chances for himself, cannot just- 
ly impose a risk on others less scrupu- 
lous or more venturesome. 

A station awaits them where the wick- 
ed oath to keep all but two criminal 
secrets, masonically told, becomes an 
oath concealing all vices, all shames, all 
crimes. He who halts at the third sta- 
tion is unaware that, after three more, 
the next station will be the one where the 
vilest criminal can inexorably demand 
cooperation in escaping the results of his 
crimes. Farther on, a curse self invoked 
is suspended forever above the head of 
him who drinks the wine of the Fifth 
Libation from a human skull ; and if he 
refused aid to that criminal the terms of 
the curse on his soul would be complete 
and eternal. Since Masonry, then, does 
not open all its doors to all its members, 
but remains a chain of degrees mostly 
hidden, Blue Lodge members, take 
blind chances for their own initiates, 



June, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



■51 



who are liable to proceed into the terri- 
tory of the chapter and the command- 
ery. So rash an assumption of grave re- 
sponsibility, involving risks taken for 
other men, is culpable because liable to 
result in most of the effects of real 
crime. 



TONG TROUBLE TERRIFIES. 

The headings of a report dated at San 
Francisco, Cal., March 22, taken togeth- 
er read as follows in an Atlantic coast 
newspaper. "Five slain in war of San 
Francisco tongs ; one man murdered in 
a temple of the hitherto immune Chinese 
'Free Masons'; Pacific coast excited; 
hinted that the crimes have to do with 
conditions in the Orient — old order of 
crime returning." The report itself be- 
gins by saying : 

With live members of the Kim Lum Society 
in Oakland, Sacramento and San Francisco 
shot down by concerted action of the Bing 
Kong Tong last night, the situation in China- 
town today is more serious than for many 
years. It is almost impossible for the police to 
clear away the veil of Oriental secrecy enough 
to know which way to turn, and they are es- 
pecially puzzled by the fact that the attack- 
ing clan was the Bing Kong, which has here- 
tofore been regarded as peaceful. 

One of the assassinations occurred in the 
temple of the Chee Kung, or Chinese Free Ma- 
sons Society, and this adds a new complica- 
tion, for the Chee Kung is powerful and 
numerous, with "chapters" all over the Pacific 
Coast, and there is much fear that the re- 
venge for last night's act may be general. 

It is said that the Chee Kungs are not 
after all freemasons, though that name 
has been used in distinguishing them from 
* brothers of other tongs ; but reason is al- 
leged for identifying them with the Box- 
ers. "If the Chee Kungs are an Ameri- 
canized branch of the Boxers, then the 
feud clarifies somewhat, for the Boxers 
are the red flag, anarchistic element in 
China which is now in arms aginst the 
republic ; and this might lead a peaceful 
and progressive tong, like the Bing 
Tong, to retaliate on the American 
branch." 

Fuey Sang, a sanguinary "gun man," 
was captured. An Americanized Chinese 
was shot in Sacramento while sitting in 
a chop suey restaurant. Another victim 
was shot six times in a Sacramento 



gambling house. A San Francisco flower 
merchant was found dead in an alley ; 
soon afterward, a man was found dead 
in his own room. In Oakland, Lee Sun 
was assassinated in the Chee Kung tem- 
ple. 

The earthquake and fire of 1906 ap- 
peared to leave Chinatown externally 
purified where, before, vice and crime 
had burrowed in baffling darkness. But 
the dog returns to his vomit and the sow 
that was washed to her wallowing in j:he 
mire. The secret orders survive, with 
ways that are dark and tricks that are 
vain ; sin trembles for a moment when 
shaken by an earthquake or revealed and 
scorched by fire, but "round the keel the 
party wave returns," and the wicked 
world goes on as before. What the 
heathen of San Francisco need is that 
light which secret orders, whether called 
Tongs or known by other names, seem 
to obscure or exclude. 



Not a few old fraternity members can 
doubtless be counted among those satis- 
fied with this wise legislation and confi- 
dent in the belief that it will on the 
whole do no harm. Though secret com- 
binations appear attractive to young un- 
dergraduates, old graduates perceive in 
the light of life's active mid-day the 
precedence due to scholarship. To this 
more primary interest Greek Letter so- 
cieties have in actual effect been inimic- 
al ; for this reason they may well be re- 
quired to clear the way for that particu- 
lar service which entitles a school to ex- 
istence. From a field cultivated solely 
for a product of intelligent and efficient 
citizenship, and enriched with costly pub- 
lic taxation, the state rightfully weeds 
out parasites. 

Such criticisms of school societies are 
apt to raise an unanswered question ; for 
from the same home in the same evening 
go the father and the son for a virtually 
identical purpose, yet the son is. in some 
degree unfitted for democratic citizen- 
ship, while the father, already a citizen, 
meets favoring rather than corrective 
legislation. If the one is measurably dis- 
qualified for citizenship how does the 
other retain his qualification unimpaired? 
If real, the difference must be explaina- 
ble. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Tune, 1912 



A FEDERAL BUREAU REPORT. 

A special investigation of a matter 
which has made a vast amount of trouble 
for school authorities, particularly in the 
Middle West, though not in that region 
alone, and has in several instances been 
carried to the highest courts, is now 
reported upon by the United States Bu- 
reau of Education. Joiners in schools 
below collegiate grade, have succeeded in 
accomplishing so much harm in twenty- 
live states of the union as to create the 
necessity for an opposing crusade. 
Twenty-live states are evenly divided in 
their treatment of the evil : thirteen re- 
sorting to legislative enactment, while in 
twelve the school boards themselves have 
taken the requisite action. The courts 
upheld the school authorities of this city, 
where the situation was for a time acute. 
An Eastern journal says editorially, 
when referring to this government re- 
port : 

It seems hard to find anybody outside the 
membership of the societies, who sees good in 
secret societies of school children. Almost 
always they lead to snobbishness and dissen- 
sion, interfere with regular school work, and 
have a demoralizing influence. Those who 
condemn them most unsparingly, are the mem- 
bers of college fraternities, in feeble imita- 
tion of which the school societies were first 
established. 

It might fairly be surmised that part 
of this college opposition, which no doubt 
is to be credited to graduates as well as 
to undergraduates, is intensified by rec- 
ognition of dangers too great to be tol- 
erated for children because found not 
safe for young men a little older. Multi- 
tudes of students are in college before 
they are out of their teens, and the dif- 
ference betwen high school seniors and 
college freshmen or sophomores is liable 
to look larger to members of college fra- 
ternities than it will when they return 
at commencement to see their sons grad- 
uate. 



INCORPORATED UNIONS. 
It is only by binding together of fam- 
ilies, tribes, and states that civilization is 
possible or becomes actual ; for the idea 
is well indicated by the derivation of the 
word. Civitas is the Latin word for 
state, and civis for citizen of the state : 
hence civilization seems to pertain to 
states, or to things becoming the state 
and making its well-ordered existence 



possible. Some of the same things are 
available for those social and business 
combinations finding place within the do- 
main of states, and controlled or guarded 
by them. The central principle of these 
as of the state itself is in the plane of 
human relations and in the orbit of hu- 
man activities : its form is orderly and 
organized combination. This is civiliza- 
tion. 

Trade guilds or unions, so formed and 
conducted as to bind men of like occupa- 
tion, are a civilizing agency so long as 
they do not cancel this quality by separ- 
ating instead of binding together those 
within the guild and those outside. "When 
this fault appears there remains a degree 
of union, yet this becomes itself a foe 
to the state and resists civilization which 
is the essence of the state. Naturally of 
an identical nature, neither should de- 
stroy the other but both should promote 
the same benevolent interests. As or- 
ganized bodies they have means of en- 
larging and confirming relations advan- 
tageous to both. One natural method not 
new to industries and tending to this 
end is suggested by the Boston JJ^atcJi- 
man in saying that "There is an increas- 
ing demand that trade unions shall be- 
come incorporated in order that they may 
be held responsible for their acts, and 
may be obliged to keep the contracts and 
agreements they make. There is also a 
demand that they be incorporated for the 
protection of their own members. As 
matters stand today, not only is each 
member of a union personally liable for 
the acts of the leaders but no member 
has any legal claim for the benefits of 
the union for which he has paid his dues. 
As long as the unions are unincorporat- 
ed, the payment of sick benefits or death 
insurance, or of aid in cases of non-em- 
ployment, is entirely at the discretion of 
the governing body.*' 

In this way it appears that a man's 
own union, composed of comrades en- 
gaged in the same work and sharing the 
same interests, does not give him the pro- 
tection afforded by the company that in- 
sures his house or the one that assumes 
the care of his welfare in case of acci- 
dent. Either of these submits itself to 
conditions which it is in the power of 
the state to enforce if the house burns 
or an accident happens. Xeither needs 



Time. 1012. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



53 



to fly a white apron flag. Publicity rath- 
er than secrecy is the safeguard of its 
patrons. The sooner the unions hold 
up their heads in company with other 
business combinations, and, like others, 
openly ally themselves with the state, or 
at least connect themselves with it in 
the way consistent with civilization, the 
sooner will they gain those benefits for 
themselves and their members for which 
they now struggle with violence and 
often with less of success than of bitter 
suffering. Or if this seems too hopeful 
a prediction, still it may be worth while 
to plan and experiment along the path 
of approximation, seeking for trade un- 
ions, still, some fraction of that ad- 
vantage which other institutions, pro- 
tected and openly governed by the state, 
already enjoy. 



A NOTABLE NEW EOOK. 

"Decidedly the best and most serious 
novel of college life in America yet writ- 
ten," is the reviewer's estimate of "Sto- 
ver at Yale,'' by Owen Johnson. After 
running as a serial in McClure's Maga- 
zine, the book has now been published by 
Stokes, and presents "An unusually bril- 
liant and sugestive criticism of American 
college life." It is not a superficial 
study, and its interest does not depend 
wholly on a picturesque element. Few 
characters are found in recent American 
fiction that are more real, or to speak 
technically, "convincing," than this group 
of college students. 

Undergraduate democracy and the so- 
ciety question, is the principal subject of 
this penetrating study. "The story is 
peculiar to Yale, perhaps too much so 
to make the widest appeal. Yet although 
the celebrated society system at New 
Haven differs from that to be found at 
any other college, in fundamental spirit 
they are all much the same." Some- 
thing similar to that with which the book 
deals in its story, actually happened at 
Yale a decade ago, when a protracted ef- 
fort ended in the abolition of Sophomore 
secret societies in that university. The 
serial is said to have enjoyed an eager 
reading by undergraduates, and this 
seems fortunate because, without being 
a text book of Moral Science or a series 
of monitory letters to young men, it has 
nevertheless the guiding and stimulating 



quality adapted to produce the fruits at 
which either kind of treatise would aim. 
The Springfield Republican recognizes 
that "Mr. Johnson's apparent conclusion 
in regard to the society system is of large 
interest, for although his story is con- 
cerned particularly with conditions as 
they are found in Xew Haven, the fault 
which he ascribes is one which exists, if 
it is a fault, in all our American colleges 
except those in which so-called open 
clubs have taken the place of the secret 
societies and fraternities. It is for the 
open or non-secret club that Mr. Johnson 
holds a brief. He does not argue against 
the selective system, apparently recog- 
nizing that the instinct to form select or- 
ganizations of one sort or another can- 
not be successfully combated, if, indeed, 
this is to be desired. In fact, if Mr. 
Johnson's position is to be judged by 
the words of his characters, he goes fur- 
ther than this, and declares his belief in 
the system at Xew Haven and his earn- 
est conviction that it does a great good 
in maintaining a tone and standard of 
clean manliness and offering an added in- 
centive to vigorous endeavor. But that 
with which he quarrels is the "mumbo 
jumbo" of secrecy, and he contends that 
the influence of the secret organizations 
would be more potent for good if they 
continued to be conducted upon the se- 
lective principle, but dropped the at- 
mosphere of secrecy, which to him is un- 
American, and which he believes in the 
first place to have grown out of mere 
nonsense and to be no more than mere 
nonsense todav." 



SUSPECTED TO EXIST. 
"Vandals raised havoc last night in the 
rooms of three teachers of the high 
school." said the news report. Some 
schoolboy whose already earned reputa- 
tion for malice or mischief entitled him 
to recognition might naturally have been 
suspected, though the report names no 
one. Y\ no broke the window pane to get 
in? Whose known tricks is it like, to 
rend covers from books or stick the 
books with mucilage ? Who would think 
it a brilliant feat to deface walls, desks, 
and even floors in the rooms of the gen- 
tleman who taught English, and the lady 
who taught Latin, and the other lady, 
who taught mathematics ? Had any pu- 



54 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1912 



pil a motive for destroying examination 
papers and the work of teachers ? Such 
inquiries after individuals, however, 
hardly appear in the report, the heading 
of which speaks of "Walls and desks de- 
faced, ink overturned, books stuck to- 
gether," adding only, "Existence of 
secret society suspected," while the whole 
report ends with the statement that "The 
school authorities are probing for the 
existence of a secret society, which they 
suspect has organized to do some sort of 
destructive work." 

The definite aim of the probe appears 
to be, not at some suspected pupil, but 
at the existence of a secret society not 
known to exist. There is a suspicion of 
its existence as soon as vandalism is 
discovered. It is as if the lady who 
taught Latin execlaimed : "This is the 
work of some secret society ;" and the 
lady who taught mathematics respond- 
ed, "that's so — it's just of a piece with 
the craziness of kid frats." One would 
think that such societies had been mak- 
ing a reputation for themselves. In fact, 
there have been many indications that 
this is one of the best known things they 
have done. 



FOR THE TIME BEING. 

An interview with former Attorney 
General Harmon when he visited Wash- 
ington was published in the New York 
Sun, and it gave some reminiscences of 
his practice before the Supreme Court. 
It was in this connection that he said 
something liable to interest such people 
as read the Cynosure because they are 
in sympathy with the kind of effort it 
makes to advocate principles which as 
patriots and Christians they feel bound 
to hold. Having referred to certain hu- 
morous incidents that occurred in the Su- 
preme Court room, Governor Harmon 
added: 

All these thoughts ran over my mind today, 
and yet, the serious one was this : That al- 
though that court had all changed with the 
exception of one estimable man in that brief 
span of time, that great tribunal goes on ; and 
I thought about the saying that "men may 
come and men may go," but our institutions, 
we trust in God, will run on forever ; and that 
the new faces bring simply loyalty to the 
great fundamental ideas upon which our gov- 
ernment is founded. 

I thought of the inspiration that that ought 
to bring to every true American when he is 



called on in any capacity to lend a hand to 
to make our institutions successful. He can 
only be there for a little time. Any ambition 
that he may have, dwindles into insignificance 
when it is compared with the idea that for the 
time being he is giving his best efforts, his 
best thought, devoting himself to the institu- 
tion which is passing through his hands; and 
the highest ambition of his life ought to be 
that his touch upon these institutions may be 
a sustaining and an improving one, and that 
when he gets through he may not be remem- 
bered as one who in a perfunctory way held a 
public position. The consolation ought to be 
that, if he can truly think, while he was there 
he upheld all the standards and passed the 
institution on to those who followed, unim- 
paired in its usefulness. That idea of respon- 
sibility can never be separated from my idea 
of public service. 

Fredom of judgment and action is 
fundamental to this idea of responsibil- 
ity, and sentiments like these are adapted 
to intensify abhorrence of shackles. 
Oaths and obligations which an ex-presi- 
dent pronounced incompatible with law, 
illy fit shoulders that wear the ermine. 
While it was true that in earlier years 
the first Chief Justice, Marshall, had 
been bound with the cable tow, in two 
score years he never crossed the thresh- 
old of a Masonic lodge. Still further, he 
cited this as evidence of the estimate he 
put upon the institution. Let the exam- 
ple and the judgment of this great jurist 
throw their light on the sentiments of 
this former Attorney General of the 
United States, and impress young men 
ambitious to rival patriots who have pre- 
ceded them with the value of freedom 
as related to responsibility. 



MOST COMPLETE WORTHY MAS- 
TER, 

The famous founder of a Masonic 
cult, who also instituted Masonic lodges 
for women, was born in 1743, and was 
the son of a poor shoemaker of Palermo, 
a city on the north shore of Sicily. 
Cardinal de Rohan, Bishop of Stras- 
bourg, believed every word this leader 
said, and following him blindly five years, 
gave him more than $200,000. It was 
quite consistent with the whole life and 
character of Guiseppe Balsamo that he 
should assume the name. Cagliostro, be- 
fore becoming famous by means of Ma- 
sonry and a score of other fictions and 
delusions. 

Limitless charities made him popular 
in Paris, whither he went from Stras- 



bourg, and bound* e - gave r 

: his asserti : □ that h i uld i k i g Id 
[n i he lid not need the 

touch oi las, for the r Ik ' 5 by 

\ gold b arrog 

.: : - : 
.■ -- . :::! :. . ?.i full : mis : 

F r :h:s ::e - 1 a harity 

; :'.: :'. s.n : _- [kerally ki :ke I ut of a 
monaster 

obtain e rk in the monks 

sho] "''.". ere he 3C n surpassed ... man- 
ors : th . rder ledge ~ - v h 
memistr - is I be had in th it • ::: : 1. 
After his . dsi frc m the m >nas- 
tery h i - him self for hile v ith 
511 i trifling : is . ml - is i rging v - 
ater :: k its rob! ing his uncle an I 
:ing ut )f ag 1 Ismith 1 huge : ri :. 
for a fabulous trc 

:::<: ::: "Zunce ?.:: : :'::e "rient, he made 
i practice : : swin lling every - 
min le I traveler rning th . best 

art ::" every faker he met He is sai i 
I . laster oi hun Ireds f bril- 

li int fakes, ; et while these I >u1 
ai le 1 him in suj [ : rting rlaims and imp :- 
- th :■;- were n >t the wh ■ '. _- : : his 
: [elusion Wine :: Egypt" 
- iff .-;- ill his 5t I in trade This 
5 gi lis rery thrc ugh the ef- 
fc I ; h he h I ilreadv 

years A remark tiful gii 

■; : I in Rome n >w a 
I him in th h an i four in 

• hi :h they t ure 1 Eur e gaining 

ess 1 th lighest s iet; : ' 
thriving ' isin :■- - it the - une tim : Sot 
long § this I teg ' ' I been 

ithered nan ad n toger 
h it "" >n irr th - th 1 V 'in i Eg pi 
lis life - millen- 
niums - I but 1 tely brought from 

alley of 
trancing -' ; 

r.g :he 

ul 1 find su - ther 

liquor 

: >ul J ud. Prin res other lig- 

mtaries re aors 

::::erre: : his wealth ; that c fa 

g men of 
Europe he was- one of the remost 
r til the end came. Was it the ir 



stro a possibl; tit 

ed him with one 
dup - : 

- 
togel 

- 

ed not 
I 

om prison 1 5. the 

pair wei 

I 

...... .. : 

jrs found 

th A fitting 

from rds of 

. - le in vvhi :h he ■ I - 

- tr - feci 

- : un Lrel 1 t in thes ^es has 

marked the -' - - profes- 

T Of ■ - - 

es, frien I : :' . and imj - 

tent sp irit-summoner g 

ptha pro] het, -. riest m -.-■ list m I 
swindler really a liar : the first magni- 
tude, thorough paced U pr evinces : : 
lying iat him is The 
king :: liars." 



A. 0. H. DETESTS ARBITRATION. 

In the A::rr:; x>n of S 
lay 3i 1\ ; : year, :_:: Hibernians met in 
EL ] m Easter ty an J 

iel i a ' ig das : 
"in« 
r.:r7z I their enthus • Ling or 

rish sf irit 
"" :e the : tuse : the H - - 
t ernians II >ver - this 

g the tre 

! States 
rreat Britaii id this 
I the s Mien the 

•ator ;in§ 

vhole mass ros I - y 

; : rm 
sh x - 

A represa ; Iris rder, 

- 
n up by Secretar 
issador Br to s n f or 

- I 
- >untry this s - - - n 

to fight the [ 

ssibl "--•■-• - 

from the iding of Car 



56 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 101: 



though they distinguish their attitude to- 
ward him as an American citizen from 
that due to him as a "Prince" of an "Im- 
perial" foreign government. 

One speaker said in part : 

"We are assembled here today for the pur- 
pose of more firmly cementing the bonds 
which tie us together in the ancient and hon- 
orable organization which has for its founda- 
tion the inspiring principles of friendship, 
charity and unity. We are gathered together 
with one idea prevalent in our minds, that 
it is by means of such organizations as ours, 
and by the proper fulfillment of the obligations 
of our noble order, that our people and our 
race are in a position to receive the aid and 
render the assistance so essential to success 
and advancement along the lines of religious, 
social, economic, and even political affiliation. 

Irish subserviency to the reactionary 
policy of Pius X can of course be se- 
curely counted on. Yet this may after 
all excite and intensify Modernism, pre- 
cipitating a disruption thai already 
threatens to be a kind of a second Ref- 
ormation. "Surely the wrath of man shall 
praise Thee." 



WOE UNTO YOU, HYPOCRITES. 

"Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, 
hypocrites !" cried the indignant Teacher 
of truth, denouncing sanctimonious dis- 
semblers. Would He say less to banded 
hypocrites of the present day? or does 
He see less flagrant hypocrisy in one of 
the latest cases of trumpet blowing? The 
steam whistle, that modern trumpet. 
lately sounded the conveyance by special 
train to Springfield, Ohio, of a Bible 
which had rested for a while in a lodge 
at Columbus. On arrival it was re- 
ceived with ceremony. Started on its 
journey from lodge to lodge in the fall 
of 1900. it is to visit at least one lodge 
in every prominent city in the United 
States. * Blank pages will receive the 
records of its custodians ; and, after all 
these entries have been made. Masonry 
will no doubt be said with assurance to 
be founded on the Bible. The round of 
lodges will probably take twenty-five 
years, and at the end of the quarter cen- 
turv Chicago Masons will receive the 
book, with its affixed records, into their 
permanent archives. 

Xow it is in order for Mohammedans 
to start a copy of their lodge Koran from 
a Masonic lodge in Cairo to Alexandria 
on the first stage of a similar journey. 
Would it not be fine and fitting to send a 



copy of the Yeda from Calcutta to Bom- 
bay? Every "Book of the Law'" used 
with the square and compass to swear 
Masonic pledges on, seems entitled to a 
trip like that provided for the one used 
in American lodges. But can there be 
anywhere, and with any book used by 
Masons who do not have a Bible, hypoc- 
risy to approach that which carries by 
special train the dishonored Book of th** 
Law used for swearing purposes and 
for giving an aspect of sanctity to sancti- 
moniously immoral obligations in Amer- 
ica ? 



SECRET SOCIETY ZOO. 

"Are you a Blue Goose or a Moose? 
or, maybe, a Red Rooster?" So runs 
the legend fitted to appropriate cuts at 
the head of an illustrated article on "The 
Secret Society Zoo," in the Hampton 
Magazine for April. The Elks' cage or 
enclosure is first visited, where the guide 
tells how the original specimens were 
captured. "Originally a theatrical order, 
the Elks grew out of a colony of English 
semi-professional actors who gathered, 
in 1867, at a boarding house on Elm 
street, Xew York. A new excise law 
had just been passed which made it pro- 
hibitory (sic) for an individual to pur- 
chase liquor in quantities to be consumed 
off the premises. An organization could, 
however, on Saturday night lay in a 
quantity for Sunday consumption. The 
result was the organization of The Jolly 
Corks, the name being taken from that 
of a similar organization in England, 
formed for the same object, that of evad- 
ing the excise law." The writer con- 
cedes that these are "humble and not 
overly creditable beginnings," but goes 
on to tell how, from Tony Pastor's thea- 
ter on the Bowery "right around the 
corner from the Elm street place," the 
Jolly Corks were freshly recruited ; and 
how, at length, the Jolly Corks were re- 
named and metamorphosed into Elks. 
In their native haunts Elks do not time 
drinks by the clock; yet 11 o'clock is 
Elkdom Hour of Recollection, when a 
toast is drunk "To our absent brothers." 

The next cage is devoted to the "Con- 
catenated order of Hoo-Hoo." Catena 
being Latin for chain, to concatenate is 
to link together. "The number nine is 
the mystic number of the Hoo-Hoo. The 



AA 



'A A . 






::::::a 
:a:e:: 






c: 



as :■ .---. 



irlv. 



■ - : age 
in Seattle the 

re cue: : :i:e eg^ 
e "S - title ler : 
hingsA "1:5 :::e::~ -.va= 

: : :::ea:r : ?.'. :-ar. : - 
I ; les - mt social features : 
-- t curbing- the 
. - :' : - 

rous e - Mngii- 

~: Eag] . ~ avoid all I] 
ting 1 - 
lown : rarth in rder t 
lent, secret 
11 in the "pin-fe.v 

- - . - ; . 

aest in A i but 

the l eai .: A is 

?d. the 
A 

Roosters 

■ ::r.- 
I in - . ith the - • i 

- the 
r r : . - 



■ 



. -. - . As Ar 1 - 
AAe::: : : :he A : -A: - 
it of this : ' . 

- A : se h ?iicj 
;ver in the - : 

" ■ " 
eggs • the result - : istant 

.:::: - f the virtu - t his i 

' . ' : - '.;.; Re: ; 
A .--_--■■. :s 
r.r.e- ::::■: 

ille in 2 _ 

: ::: ::: r.t : hin : . : 

nion Loop has . 

-' A : : '.: :t re: ; 

It is not genei 
11 a man a goose, ai 
.-:>;■■"".:". :u at i 

--.:■--'■ :. A::e :: : Sc • : A a 

- -ire :::: - r::er. s.:: ' A-:ev :se ■ 
e:A er ; : :: -able 
" .--' : :::e Ae I : e. > : :r :dy \vi:h- 

the amenities." The antiqui: 
back to a date so an: tent 



; A A: . : :r ::: Ae ' Ae ieese t. ..: ~ 2 '• 
Oreen L: 

rg nized fii 
: .:: :.: 

- Aec A 2, sen the first 
\A-s: 1 - /A ■ i at 

and Wiel r : 

i from a § 
scream, m . - - .: - irer 

rper f the 
geese. 

- i :' 

the H A: an ! chat 

"the s are 

the A ged in rooms 

feste ! with hite r its "The 

- is i ■ of the i 

■■ - - Io En^ i s iety 

■■ ■; o first called L not in 

lin but of a horse ::e 

near ::.:::: 

: but at the s 
tor a i ' i - 

The jollification . that 

ghl 7.2- 

\. 
::: Am meet- 

ther actors 

I 
have a trade u ere 

- reject 



.. :::: 






Ffcer - 








- 



- .7 
a r e prolific : ver 

3 
sters 
siting the 

that the squar 

• - 
- ■ . - 

Festers 



? from t 

"ourt in ■ . ' 



: - 









hitc i 

- 
upon the A 

: 3 tO 1 

that once - it fl 

V 
■s fi 

t remains the 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 191' 



Oriole is a despicable hang-bird ; to the 
Oriole the owl seems only a vicious bird 
of prey. Accordingly, claws and beaks 
are bloody with fraternal war. 
CYNOSURE— 6 

Little boys playing horse are charm- 
ing ; a delight to memory is such a bare- 
foot boy with his juvenile creative im- 
agination. But what of an adult man 
playing moose? Why should one prefer 
to be called a rat? After v all, there re- 
main some questions, the answers of 
which may not be altogether dishearten- 
ing. There is apt to come a time when 
it can be said of the devotees of almost 
any form of mischievous folly: "But 
they shall proceed no further ; for their 
folly shall be evident unto all men." To 
what an expensive reductio absurdum 
have crazy fraternal insurance schemes 
been wont to come ! How scattered is 
the brood of wretched chickens strag- 
gling- after the Masonic mother and 
Jesuit grandmother of the chirping flock ! 
Does not all this tend to dispel the dan- 
gerous glamor, and fade the impressive 
halo that seems to have invested Ma- 
sonry with perilous charm? The fake 
insurance lodge may after all be the 
wooden horse of the Masonic Troy. 



Iett>0 of ©ur PorfL 



A YEAR'S REVIEW, 

SECRETARY W. B. STODDARD. 

To the friends of the Anti-Secrecy 
Cause, Greeting : It has been my privi- 
lege to labor with you in a needy depart- 
ment of the Master's vineyard for an- 
other year. It is fitting that we take ac- 
count of stock ( as the merchant would 
say ) . that we may thank God for ac- 
complishments and gain wisdom for fu- 
ture efforts. 

It will be understood that no report 
can give an accurate view of what is ac- 
complished. The number of addresses 
made, the attendance at meetings, the in- 
terest manifest, as well as the amount of 
literature circulated, may be given, but 
God alone knows what has been wrought 
in the hearts and lives touched. The 
number kept from uniting with lodges or 
the exact number liberated can not be re- 
ported. One of the great joys of service 



is the constant meeting of those who tes- 
tify to the help received. Not a few give 
thanks for light which has led from 
Lodge bondage into the freedom of the 
Christian's life. To the large number of 
misleaders in pulpits and elsewhere may 
be laid the blame for the terrible Lodge 
conditions that obtain. 

Men, like blind, silly sheep, often fol- 
low each other to destruction. Oh, how 
many jump on the "band wagon" and 
follow the loudest noise, with little con- 
sideration as to where the procession will 
end ! Until unregenerate nature is 
changed we shall find Lodge principles 
in some form. Many lodges, proving 
failures in financial and other lines, are 
dying only to make a place for new or- 
ders to supply opportunity for those 
waiting to be caught. The "special pull" 
promised by the Lodge very naturally 
appeals to such. In a mad rush for self 
aggrandizement there is little considera- 
tion of "icebergs" ahead. Surely the 
truth of the Scripture statement, "he that 
saveth his life shall lose it," is shown 
again and again. 

Our hope for ultimate success is in 
Him "who holdeth the waters in His 
hand," "who accounteth the nations as 
the dust in the balance." 

During the year 'I have realized much 
more nearly the greatness of my mission. 
We are called to exalt Him who alone 
can give the spiritual light this dark 
world needs. Surely there is no institu- 
tion of men that at all compares with the 
Secret Lodge System in obscuring the 
light. In this country there are more 
than ten million souls worshiping at the 
lodge shrines, and why? Because of a 
delusion, wilful or otherwise. There 
could be no lodges or lodge advocates 
were the Gospel Light shining in every 
soul. The burden of my message has 
been Christ and Him crucified, the great 
need of humanity! We must not only 
center our effort in Him, but be careful 
not to wander from the center. 

In the accomplishment of my work 1 
have kept in mind at least two plans — 
first, to be systematic ; second, to direct 
efforts in fields likely to be productive. 
The man who travels the fartherest is 
not always the one who accomplishes the 
most. There is much advantage in ac- 
quaintance with the people and the field. 



June, 191: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



59 



The new fields must be discovered and 
reached as far as possible, but it's the 
systematic cultivation of the old that 
usually gives the best harvest. I find 
little profit and much sorrow in running 
after lodge ministers. Some are doubt- 
less conscientious and deceived, but the 
sophistry and attempted deception of the 
most of them is shocking to behold. The 
same general line of foolish declarations 
is usually made by each ; the first silly 
statement usually is: "If you don't be- 
long you don't know." When I meet 
these blind leaders, determined not to 
see, I must pass them, knowing that God 
alone can bring about the needed trans- 
formation. 

Thank God there are still many pastors 
and churches that are neither cowardly 
nor unwilling to hear the antisecrecy 
message. A goodly number of schools, 
colleges and seminaries welcome the 
truth I bring. Young hearts uncontami- 
nated by lodge deceptions make fruitful 
fields for effort. The students of more 
than a dozen colleges and seminaries and 
Bible schools are among those to whom 
I have brought welcome messages during 
the year. 

In the student body of the Christian 
and Missionary Alliance at Nyack, X. Y., 
are found eighteen nationalities. From 
these are selected the missionaries going 
to the ends of the earth. I mention them 
as representative of those it has been my 
privilege to help to a better understand- 
ing of the questions we have in hand. In 
one hundred and twenty-nine addresses, 
the antilodge thought has been central ; 
sixty-seven sermons or addresses were 
devoted to other topics. The estimated 
number of calls ( two thousand three 
hundred) is a slight increase over last 
year. There is also an increase in the 
number of Cynosure subscriptions ob- 
tained, the number this year being nine 
hundred and seventeen, amounting to 
$9 1 7-5°- The collections at meetings not 
including moneys secured for state con- 
ventions amount to $257.12. The ex- 
pense of travel was $348.91 ; hotel ac- 
commodations $158.56. By comparison I 
note that collections have been less, while 
expense of travel has increased. Owing 
to the kind hospitality of friends, the 
hotel bills have not been unusual. Col- 
lections are not easilv riven bv some 



friendly churches. Owing to the denom- 
inational requirements many churches 
hesitate to divert any funds from their 
regular channels. They are often hard 
pressed to meet requirements. The se- 
curing of Cynosure subscriptions makes 
it possible to keep work moving where 
there is lack in the direct contribution. 
Notwithstanding the constant increase in 
reading matter, the coldness of some, the 
indifference of others, your representa- 
tive has been able to secure a commend- 
able support for the Cynosure in fields 
given to his care. If in some way we 
could awaken friends to the need, many 
thousands would be added to our list at 
once. The forces of darkness press their 
efforts hard and constantly, why should 
the children of light do less? 

Our conventions are the arteries 
through which new life goes through the 
states. They should be increased in 
number and influence. As your repre- 
sentative I have been an active worker in 
four state gatherings during the year. In 
Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin and Pennsyl- 
vania I have sought to be an aid in what 
was accomplished. The records have ap- 
peared in the Cynosure. The benefac- 
tions of these conferences are among the 
people. Surely I have reason to thank 
God for His kind, protecting care, and 
the health required in the prosecution of 
this work. 

It is evident there is an increasing 
cowardice, and a giving away to lodge in- 
fluences on the part of some churches, 
but God is bringing to the front new 
churches and peoples, who will stand 
firm amid the backsliders. The Church 
of the Xazarene is an illustration of 
those coming forward to aid in the great 
w T ork. 

Born of Heaven, Our Work Cannot Die. 

The rushing of the "I'nsinkable Ti- 
tanic" with its burden of life and millions 
of gold, to the ocean depths, tells of the 
failure of man, but God never fails. 
Nothing is so sure as the ultimate tri- 
umph of what pertains to His Kingdom. 
Is not God today speaking to our nation ? 
What means the battle and strife sound- 
ing in our ears? We have before us the 
spectacle of two brother Masons fighting 
like Kilkennv cats, that they mav secure 



60 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1912 



the presidential prize. Are they thus 
manifesting the boasted brotherly love 
claimed to be secured by lodge member- 
ship? Does their abuse of each other 
show the love proclivities of the lodge 
and also convince the American people of 
their fitness to rule in the affairs of a 
great nation ? We shall see ! It is true 
that "Brother" Taft did fly to the relief 
of "Brother" Morse, although slower 
than required by his masonic obligation. 
However, his treatment of Brother 
[Morse is doubtless a more fitting illus- 
tration of the love proclivities of the 
lodge than it is to show his fitness or the 
lack of it to rule. Since the release of 
Banker Morse he is reported to have re- 
covered. Will the American people con- 
tinue to join lodges known to be aiding 
criminals or will there be a change ? 
While seeking to bring to light those who 
love darkness because of evil deeds, it 
remains for us to trust in the God who 
works in the affairs of men and who will 
ultimately destroy the devices of Satan. 
We need not look for help from the 
large popular movements of our day. 
Ours is not a reform brought about 
through "band-wagon" methods. Like 
sunlight or dew it radiates and permeates 
as truth takes hold on heart and life. To 
God be all the glory, ours the honor of 
the co-worker. 

Yours in the Conflict, 

W. B. Stoddard. 



"•MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 
Mason, Tenn., April 15, 191 2. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips. Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother in Christ : I have been 
here for about ten days. I left Jackson, 
Tenn., last Saturday. I gave out the 
tracts you sent me, and they stirred the 
Masons up to a fighting pitch. I was at 
a revival meeting one night where they 
were calling for those that wanted pray- 
er. I saw two men sitting together. I 
said to them. Won't you come and join in 
this prayer? They said, "No, we are 
Christians." Well, I see from your pins 
that you are brothers in the lodge also. 
They said, "Yes, we are Masons." i 
said. Well, you have an idol to serve as 
god. They said, "No, you are wrong. 
Masonry came right from the Bible." 



Does the Bible teach men to ki 



They 



answered, "No." Well, what made you 
kill that man in the Masonic hall here at 
Jackson ten years ago? They looked at 
each other and winked their eyes and one 
of them said, "We did not kill him." I 
said, Who was it then ? There was some 
killing done. He said, "Yes, but I did 
not kill him." The other fellow said. "I 
never killed a man in my life." Well, 
maybe it did not fall to your lot to kill 
him, and yet he was killed right in your 
hall. I said, how was he killed ? They 
said, "Well, you will never know the na- 
ture of the case. He was killed, but we 
were not there. We did not have one 
thing to do with it." I said, Brothers ! it 
is a great sin to belong to an organization 
that kills men. You are sinning. One 
said, "Yes, but I have too much money in 
there now to come out. All men sin and 
I may as well sin in one way as another. 
W r e all sin every day. As my money is in 
this thing, I will try it a little longer. I 
know myself that the lodges are wrong, 
but everybody else in the civilized world 
belongs to some kind of order, so I am 
not the only one that belongs to them." 1 
read to him Romans 2 13 : 

"And thinkest thou this, O man, that judg- 
est them which do such things, and doest the 
same, that thou shalt escape the judgment of 
God?" 

He replied, "Well, God's W r ord is 
right ; now tell me how did you find out 
so much about my lodge?" I handed him 
the tract called "Freemasonry." He 
looked at it and said, "Well, you have 
got us." The other fellow was so angry 
that he would not talk. 

I went a little farther down the aisle, 
and spoke to a man and his wife. I said. 
Are you sinners or Christians? "We are 
Christians." Well, help pray for the sin- 
ners then. They said, "Yes." I said to 
the brother, You look like a minister. He 
, said, "Yes, I am a Baptist preacher." I 
looked at his square and compass and 
said. Well, you are a Mason also! He 
laughed and said, "How do you know 
that?" By the pin you have on. He said, 
"Yes, I belong to the best lodge in the 
world." Then I began to tell him how 
sinful the lodges are. I told him he was 
in the counsel of the ungodly. (Ps. 1:1.) 
T began to tell the horrible penalties he 
had to swear to. He did not want the 
people nor his wife to hear me tell on 
him, so he said, "Tell me where you are 



June, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



01 



stopping. I want to come and have a 
long talk with you about the matter." I 
told him where to call, but he did not 
come. 

He was at church again on Sunday 
night, and I lectured on the sin of secret 
societies. They met last Tuesday night 
in the lodge and discussed me. Some of 
them said my husband must have told me 
about it ; others said this tract tells the 
secret, so they buzzed around about it, 
and at last decided to send a committee 
to wait on me. 

This committee came to the church and 
sal away back near the door, and asked 
one of the ministers : "Where is the lady 
that has the tracts against secret socie- 
ties? Tell her we want to get some of 
those tracts." The minister came and 
told me and I went to them. The Baptist 
preacher that promised to come where I 
was stopping was with them. One was a 
railroad man, a wild, hard sinner ; the 
other was a railroad man. but he said he 
was a Christian. I gave them some of 
the tracts, but did not let on that I knew 
that they were sent to wait on me. They 
hardly knew how to start asking me 
about it. They talked around a few min- 
utes and then the preacher said, "I had to 
go away last week and did not have time 
to come around to see you. so I thought I 
would drop in tonight to see you. These 
brothers wanted some of your tracts." I 
said, This mairsays he is a sinner; why 
*do you call him brother? He said, "Well, 
I was not, thinking when I called him 
brother." I saw that they did not know 
just how to get at me, so T said, This is 
that committee sent from vour meeting 
Tuesday night, is it not ? They looked at 
each other and marveled at my saying. 
Then the sinner said, "Who told you we 
had a meeting?" I said. Some of the 
brothers were cutting up about it at the 
boarding house, saying that we ought to 
kill that woman, and that Association, 
whoever they are, ought to be killed. He 
said, "How do you know they said that?" 
I said, A woman heard them talking and 
came by my place and called the lady out 



that I am stopping with and told her that 
the Masons met last night and discussed 
all that the sister had said, and I over- 
heard some of them talking about killing 
her and that Association that sent out 
those tracts. He said: "I don't think 
anybody said that, and yet, don't you 
think, when men meddle with a man for 
taking care of his family, he ought 
to be killed?" I answered: Well. 
you are a sinner. Ask this preacher what 
he thinks about it? The preacher said. 
"No, that would not be right. God said 
'Thou shalt not kill.' " I now said, 
Preacher, you are tied up with vile sin- 
ners who think men ought to be killed 
for telling them the way of life. He 
said, "We don't kill men in our lodge for 
telling the secrets. We suspend them. 
But these tracts don't tell any of our 
secrets. Our lodge is different from 
this." I said, What did you come to wait 
on me for if these tracts don't concern 
your lodge? He laughed and looked 
puzzled. 

I then told them about how I first got 
hold of the tracts through Elder I. J. 
Bailey and wife at Dermott, Ark., when 
I worked in the Southeast Baptist Wo- 
men's Association. He said, "T am a Bap- 
tist and you are Baptist, you ought not 
to be so hard against me." I said, I love 
you as a brother in Christ, and know you 
as God's minister, but I am against sin. I 
am not hard against you. It is the sin in 
you that I am fighting. I said, you can- 
not help this poor sinner here, because 
the devil has you yoked up with him and 
you are a partaker of his sins. He thinks 
more of lodge than you do of the church. 
We are here holding a revival meeting 
trying to get sinners saved, and you arc 
going with sinners to labor with me for 
teaching the way of life. Woe unto the 
foolish (Ezk. 13:3.; Jer. 12:10). They 
said, "Well, we will go. Thanks for the 
tracts." 

Then the preacher and the sinner went 
out and left the other man sitting there 1 
said to him. You are one of the commit- 
tee. He laughed and said, "Well, T 
reckon so." Three Masons were con- 
verted in the revival meeting and have 
quit. One of them said that the lodges 
were not fit for a good moral sinner to 
belong to. Yours for the work. 

Lizzie Rocerson. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1912 



A MURDERER FROM THE BEGIN- 
NING. 

Quite recently in the state of Iowa a 
Methodist pastor was preaching to his 
people. In that town a certain lodge man 
who was not a Christian had been buried 
in a very extravagant manner by the 
lodge. The statement respecting this 
matter is, "They gave him a one thou- 
sand dollar funeral."' The pastor said to 
his people. "You all knew him and you 
know that a thousand dollar funeral will 
not buy you a crown in heaven." Three 
living brothers of this dead and buried 
lodge man heard of this remark which 
the pastor had made to his people and 
were angry, and some of the lodge men in 
the church sympathized with the lodge 
men outside the church. This of course 
is no new thing. It is always so. The 
lodge church members sent for the pre- 
siding elder and demanded of him that 
the pastor should be sent away from the 
church where he was serving as a Chris- 
tian minister. But the elder, who was 
not a lodge man, said that there was no 
cause for action and that he would not 
disturb the pastor. 

On April 19 one of these brothers of 
dead lodge man on the street struck the 
minister several blows on the face draw- 
ing blood. The minister made no resist- 
ance but caused the arrest of the man 
and the justice fined him ten dollars, and 
I suppose, costs. In the Providence of 
God the evangelist who informs me of 
these facts was passing through the place 
in a day or two and learned the above 
facts. Having twenty minutes at his dis- 
posal before train time he sang on the 
street and denounced the man who struck 
the preacher. 

The following week one of the broth- 
ers of the man who made the assault pub- 
lished a notice saying that he would 
speak on April 27th at 2 130 o'clock p. m. 
in answer to the remarks made by the 
evangelist. Being informed of this pub- 
lication, the evangelist wrote immediately 
to the preacher saying that as soon as he 
was through with the meeting which he 
was then holding, he would in the name 
of the Lord publicly affirm that this 
brother of the lodge man, in striking a 
Methodist preacher, committed an out- 
rageous wrong, sinned against God and 
would certainly be damned forever un- 



less he repented. He said he would af- 
firm this if the man who had advertised 
to speak against him would deny it. 

This evangelist says that he is extreme- 
ly weary, having been in meetings almost 
continuously since August, speaking both, 
in churches and on the street, but that 
such blatant defiance of God, and such an 
outrage against His servant he cannot 
abide and must speak publicly in this 
town once more, denouncing the assailant 
of the faithful pastor. 

Pray for this dear man. His name is 
Rev. E. F. Miller. He seems to be in ev- 
ery way a devoted and faithful worker. 
Perhaps some of our readers will wish 
to secure his help in public testimony for 
Christ and His people. 



OUR SOUTHERN LETTER. 

Mobile, Ala., May 9, 1912. 

Dear Cynosure-: I stopped, on my 
way here, in St. Landry. Lafayette, Ibe- 
ria, St. Mary and Terrebonne parishes, 
La. In a great part of St. Landry the 
water is very high and many, having 
been driven from their homes, are being 
fed by the government. Hundreds of 
head of live stock have perished. In 
many sections it will be impossible to 
make a crop ; thus misery is added to 
misery. All crops throughout central, 
southwest, and southern Louisiana are at 
least six weeks behind. 

I spent a short time in Xew Orleans 
and arranged a meeting on my return. I 
am here by special invitation of Dr. Wm. 
Johnson, pastor of Franklin Street Bap- 
tist Church, the largest and finest Negro 
church in the city.' It boasts two thou- 
sand members. Dr. Johnson is a very 
able and cultured young minister, a 
graduate of Leland University of New 
Orleans, and an earnest advocate of 
righteousness. Like a great many other 
worthy young men, he too has felt the 
sting of the lodge wasp, but like thou- 
sands of other courageous men of God 
he sees and confesses the evil influence 
of the secret lodge upon his race and its 
unwholesome influence upon the Church.' 

This city, like all southern cities, is 
greatly afflicted and infested with secret 
societies of many kinds, all claming to 
be founded upon the Bible and thereby 
leading thousands and thousands into sin 
and folly. 



Tune. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



68 



We are having a great soul-saving re- 
vival here at the Franklin Street Church 
and I am trying to impress upon them the 
importance of separating themselves 
from the lodge so as to have power with 
God, and influence to bring erring ones 
back to God our Savior. 

I met with the Weekly Conference of 
negro ministers here Wednesday, and de- 
livered an address to them and secured a 
number of names for the Cynosure. 

The secret lodge element in my home 
town, Alexandria, is greatly wrought up 
and at a loss to know what to do to sup- 
press both my voice 'and the Cynosure. 
A great many are beginning to open their 
eyes to the folly of the secret lodge sys- 
tem. Pray God's blessing upon my work. 
Yours sincerely, 

F. T. Davidson. 



ANOTHER CALL FROM AFAR. 

Garmouch, Aintab, Turkey. 
April 15, 1912. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips. 

Dear Brother : I have seen some tracts 
during the past few weeks written 
against "secret societies," published by 
the National Christian Association. I 
read them with pleasure. They were 
touching just the present wounds of my 
nation. After the announcement of the 
Constitution, the "Union and Progress" 
committee began trying to uproot the na- 
tional foundations of our poor Armenian 
country. But in addition to them we are 
now face to face with another more terri- 
ble power ; that is, "secret societies," 
which are working among us and de- 
stroying the moral and spiritual life. Of 
course this fact is a fire making our 
hearts to burn. Many educated men, of 
whom we hoped good for our destroyed 
nation, have passed over to that side, it 
is s'aid ; I regret to say that even some of 
our pastors are in favor of these secret 
societies. 

I can't understand how a true Christian 
can feel the need of joining with such so- 
cieties, hoping good from them that he 
cannot find in the church. Is the power 
of Christ shorter or less than the secret 
societies? I believe that the best way for 
the true welfare of mankind is in Christ 
Jesus our Lord and King, and for this 
cause I am writing 1 to you, brother, to 



ask you to send some essential tracts or 
books which expose the harms of the 
lodges, in order that I may have some 
true knowledge about their evils. I hope 
that God will help me use some of these 
facts to help His work in the Kingdom. 
My attitude is to stand firm on the Word 
of God and serve only Christ. Pray for 
us. 

Yours with brotherly love in Christ. 
(Rev.) Hagop V. Najarian. 



A PATRIOTIC JUDGE. 

Portland, Ore., April 29, 191 2. 
Mr. W. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir : I send you below the sub- 
stance of a clipping taken from the Port- 
land "Oregonian" of April 11, which 
gives an inkling of what is going on in 
labor unions. The report is from the 
Superior Court of King County, Wash 
Yours sincerely, 

Frank D. Frazer. 



Seattle, Wash., April 10th. — Superior Judge 
A. W. Frater denied the application of Lars 
Emanuel Boman for naturalization today be- 
cause Boman said he would stand by his la- 
bor union in preference to the government 
of the United States. Boman attempted to 
evade the question when Judge Frater asked 
him what he would do if the court should 
issue an order that conflicted with the orders 
of the union, and when pressed for a direct 
answer retorted : 

"A man who belongs to an organization 
should stick to it." 

The courtroom was filled with applicants 
waiting for their citizenship papers and Judge 
Frater told them that if any entertained ideas 
similar to Boman's they might retire. ./ dozen 
men left at once! 

"I want it understood now and forever that 
the man who would supplant the Stars and 
Stripes with the red flag or any other flag 
need not expect to be made a citizen in this 
court," said Judge Frater. "You must give 
your highest oath of allegiance to the gov- 
ernment and to no sect, society or organiza- 
tion." 



"In a neighborly consideration of oth- 
ers one should not overlook the grace of 
conversation. To keep plea-ant talk go- 
ing is not simply a tine art : it is the mark 
of a erenial and considerate nature." 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. June, 1912: 

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REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
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Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
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^Edited by Rev. A. W. Geeslin. Illustrated 
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MODERN SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard. L>. D., President 
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A brief treatise for busy people and especially 
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FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character. Claims and Practical Work- 
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G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason." but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper. 
50 cents. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



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It is astonishing hG\v soon the whole 
::r. science begins to unravel if a sin- 
gle stitch drops: cne little sin indulged. 
makes a hole you could put your head 
through. — Charles Buxton. 

Thy one grea: iesire is to fellow 
Him fully: canst thou not say. then, a 
continual "yes" to all His sweet com- 
mands, whether small or great, and 
trust Him to lead thee by the shortest 
road to thy fullest blessedness? — H. 
W Smith. 

Surely the truth must be. that what- 
soevei in our daily life is lawful and 
right for us to be engaged in. is in it- 
self a part of our obedience to God — a 
part, that is of our very religion. — H. E. 
Manning. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE national christian association. 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS GENERAL OFFICERS. 

Managing Editor. 
850 West Madison Street, Chicago. President, Rev. E. B. Stewart; Vice- 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION P resident ' ^ ^ B f^ • ReC ° rdin * 

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vA^r* 1 E-ll 1 O the Brethren ) f E R Worrell (Presby- 
terian), D. S. Warner (Free Methodist), 

Ohio State Convention 65 T c Wendell (Free Methodist) and P. 

Wheaton College. Poem, by Frank E. Her- ^ ^ Rittilsby (Lutheran). 

The National Meeting and Convention — ■ 

"Is Membership in a Secret Society Help- 
ful to the Christian Life?" Address _, . . ,. 

by Rev. J. A. Alexander 68 Those desiring lectures or addresses 

Letters to the Convention : Mrs. Anna may write to any of the speakers named 

E. Stoddard, Mr. E. Brace, Mrs. C. A. below : 

Johnson, Mr. John Bradley, Mrs. Liz- R ev> W. B. Stoddard, 3118 Fourteenth 

zie Roberson, Prof. Moses H. Clemens, St., N. W., Washington D. C. 

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Attitude of the Covenanter Church Toward Rev - C G ' Fait > Ellendale, N. D. 

Secret Labor Organizations, by James Rev. B. E. Bergesen, 1727 West 56th 

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Southern Agent's Report : 94 

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'Jesus answered him, — 1 spake openly t* ttoe worid; and in secret have I said nothing." John [8:20. 



VOLUME XLV. 



CHICAGO, JULY, 191: 



NUMBER 3 




WHEATON COLLEGE. 



OHIO STATE CONVENTION. 



The Ohio annual convention will prob- 
ably meet in the Mennonite Church near 
Bluffton, Tuesday and Wednesday. July 
30th and 31st. A card has been received 
from the State President, W. S. Gott- 
shall, suggesting that time and place, and 
Secretary Stoddard writes that he fa- 
vors that plan, and expects to spend July 
in Ohio. May our Ohio constituency 
plan to aid the coming conference, 



B\* FRANK E. HERRICK. 

A lighthouse flaming on the coast 

Of Time's wild, rock-embattled deep, 

Sends light to where the furthermost 
Lone lookouts their long vigils keep ! 

Fiercely the adverse winds of time 
Have beaten on that tower of stone ; 

But still, serene, steadfast, sublime, 
Its faithful beacon-blaze has shone. 

When clouds have wrapped earth in their- 
pall, 

And left the night without a star. 
Doomed vessels in the tempest's thrall 

Have seen its warning light afar, 

And when the ocean plunged and rolled 
It stretched its arms of light to save. 

As good St. Christopher of old 

Bore pilgrim bands across the wave ! 

The ocean thunders at its base. 

And mountain billows lash its form ; 

Smote by the lightning's iron mace 
And loud artillery of the storm ; 

Yet calm, unmindful of the shock. 

Strong in its builders' wise designs. 
Firm-planted on th' eternal Rock, 

It lifts its light-crowned head— and shines'/ 

The years — those tides on Time's wide waste 
That ebb and ebb but never flow — 

Have never seen that light effaced 
Xor tremor in its steady glow ! 

Tranquil, maiestic may it stand 

Where Life's mad breakers roar, and send 
Its radiance over sea and land 

Till all the storms of Time shall end! 

May 25. 1912. Wheaton. 111. 



"When one knocks at the door of my 
heart and asks, \\ r ho lives here, T an- 
swer. Martin Luther used to live here: 
but he has moved out, and Jesus Christ 
has moved in." 



66 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1912. 



The National Meeting and Convention 



The Annual Business Meeting and 
Convention of the Association was held 
in the Second United Presbyterian 
Church. Chicago. The minutes of the 
Business Meeting will be published in a 
subsequent number of the Cynosure. 

Secretary Phillips presided at the 
Thursday evening meeting. The weath- 
er was ideal for a convention. For a 
city congregation, there was a good au- 
dience, and its quality was all that could 
have been desired. Among the denom- 
inations represented by those present 
were the Presbyterian, Methodist Epis- 
copal, Congregational, United Presby- 
terian. Christian Reformed, Mennonite, 
Reformed Presbyterian, Free Methodist, 
Church of the Brethren, Lutheran, 
United Brethren (Radical), Swedish 
Lutheran and Free Mission. 

The value of the meeting to the cause 
would be hard to estimate ; to say the 
least, it is many times its cost. Take it 
all in all. I think we have never held a. 
meeting which will have a more far 
reaching influence. It is speaking sober 
truth to say that the closing address each 
evening as given by Mr. Woolley or 
President Blanchard — was a fitting cli- 
max to those which went before and 
were in themselves worth a pilgrimage. 



Mr. Phillips: As the pastor of this 
church is out of the 'city, Mr. J. G. 
Brooks, pastor of the College Church at 
Wheaton, will speak a few words of 
welcome. 

Rev. J. G. Brooks : I am glad to be 
here. This has been a pretty busy day 
for me. I had to attend the closing ses- 
sion of our Congregational Conference 
at Elgin, this morning, and then attend 
the trial of a man who had been selling 
whisky in my town. Then I came to 
Chicago and had to go out on the north 
side and really, I came pretty near not 
being here. Let me tell you why 1 
came : I said to myself, if my father 
were living he would be there ; if Mr. 
Moody were here in the city he would 
be there; if Joseph Cook could be in 
Chicago, he would be there ; and I 



thought of a lot of splendid men that 
have been towers of strength that would 
be here if they could be, and I said, I 
will be there ! It is a great thing to be in 
the fellowship of those who are fighting 
for the Kingdom of our Lord. I re- 
member about twenty years ago, attend- 
ing a convention in Chicago. I know we 
were quite disappointed because we got 
word that Joseph Cook could not come 
from Boston to give an address at the 
time, and everybody wanted to hear him. 
We felt a little bit discouraged. Dr. 
Blanchard was giving the address of the 
evening when in came Mr. Cook and 
took a seat near the door, and pretty 
soon it was whispered that Mr. Cook 
was here. 

I was sitting with some friends, on 
that evening, and a lady said at the close 
of the masterly address by Dr. Blanch- 
ard : "How jealous he is for the Lord." 
That stuck by me for twenty years. A 
man is not laboring much in this cause 
unless he is jealous for the Lord. 

It is a great thing to welcome each 
other. We ought to have cheerfulness 
in our work, for we are right. You have 
a right to smile arid rejoice and greet 
each other with the glad hand for w r e 
should encourage each other in the work 
of the Lord. One of the things that 
impressed me in a convention that we 
had up in Wisconsin a few months ago, 
was the loyalty of the friends to their 
own work, in their own denomination, 
and also to this cause by coming togeth- 
er in spiritual helpfulness. 

I am glad to see so many of the 
friends of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation and I am glad to be here in fel- 
lowship with my dear Brother Phillips 
and others in this work. 



Mr. Phillips : The president of our as- 
sociation, Rev. E. B. Stewart, will say a 
few words in reply to the address of 
welcome. 

Pres. E. B. Stewart : We are having 
a great deal said and done in these days 
to interest men. We have had "Lay- 
men's Missionary Movement," and "Men 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



67 



and Religion Forward Movement." And 
it lately came to my ears that some of 
the churches are beginning to find out 
that men need to be interested in the 
Ghurch. I heard one of the speakers in 
the recent Men and Religion Forward 
Movement campaign tell of a large 
church which had seven hunderd men on 
its list of members and only twenty-six 
of them were engaged in active, aggres- 
sive Christian effort. That was given 
as a sample of a very poor kind of 
church, although a very large church 
with a large membership. The question 
is suddenly confronting us : What is the 
matter with the men? Why are they not 
interested in the church? They are mem- 
bers of it but not aggressive supporters 
of it, why? I understand that in some 
quarters from over this land, the report 
is coming up to denominational head- 
quarters that it is the secret orders that 
are absorbing the energies of men. And 
1 am creditably informed that that in- 
formation is going to be suppressed, and 
will not see the light. I have correct 
information, I think, on that point, al- 
though it does not apply to the denom- 
ination of which I am a member. 

Now I am glad to be here tonight in 
this meeting, because I believe that we 
are aiming at the real thing that all these 
various other religious movements have 
been striving to get done in the church — 
to remove the thing that is in the way 
of the men — and I know of nothing that 
is more in the way of the men of the 
Church than the Lodge System. It is 
not a thing that many pastors in the de- 
nominations are proclaiming from the 
pulpit, or from the house top, but a great 
many of them, when you corner them 
and ask them what their men are doing, 
admit that something else than the 
Church of Jesus Christ is absorbing 
their energy and their thought. 

I am interested in the National Chris- 
tian Association because it strikes at that 
great evil which keeps many aggressive 
men from being aggressive workers in 
the Christian Church. It may be true 
that my observation is not wise — I have 
been a minister for just twenty years, 
having had only two pastorates, one in 
San Francisco and one in Chicago, but I 
have been in a great many churches, 



just the same — I have never met but one 
man yet among laymen that was an ag- 
gressive soul winner w r ho was an active, 
aggressive lodge man. 

Rev. Dr. Dillon : You have done bet- 
ter than I can, if you have found one. 

Mr. Stewart: I do not want to say 
that they do not exist, but I am giv- 
ing you my experience of twenty years. 
Now it may be there are thousands of 
them. I am not saying that they are 
not to be found, but I am saying that I 
have not seen and have not found them. 
and I have been interested in every large 
campaign in the cities that I have been 
in during the last twenty years. That is 
with reference to the majority of the 
men in the community, and that is an- 
other reason why I believe in this as- 
sociation. That experience which be- 
longs to me, teaches me that the Lodge 
is a hindrance to aggressive, active soul 
winning on the part of a great many 
men. 

I don't want to make a speech, I may 
be trespassing now on some of the 
speakers that are to follow. I am sim- 
ply here to respond in a few words of 
welcome. It seems to me that I am not 
a stranger in this city. I have lived here 
sixteen years, and yet I am supposed to 
represent you who gather from all parts 
of the country for this convention, and 
I am sure we are grateful for the words 
of welcome ; we are grateful for the hos- 
pitality extended to us by the officials of 
this Church, and I am sure that it is the 
prayer of every member of this Associa- 
tion ana every friend that is here now. 
that before this convention is finished we 
shall have accomplished something in 
arousing the people of this community, 
and the people of our Churches to the 
conditions that confront us with respect 
to the men and women who are kept 
from doing the aggressive work of the 
Church of Jesus Christ by being ab- 
sorbed so largely in such institution- as 
abound all over the land. 



Mr. Phillips: We will now- be ad- 
dressed by the Rev. J. A. Alexander. 
pastor of the United Presbyterian 
Church of Crafton, Pennsylvania, on the 
subject, "Is Lodge Connection Helpful 
to Christian Life?'' 



68 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1912. 




ALEXANDER. 



IS MEMBERSHIP IN A SECRET SO- 
CIETY HELPFUL TO THE 
CHRISTIAN LIFE? 



Rev. J. A. Alexander : I shall make a 
slight verbal change in the statement of 
my theme as given by the Chairman, 
which, however, does not affect in any 
sense the essence of it ; and I would that 
you might very carefully ponder the 
form of the statement : Is Membership 
in a Secret Society Helpful to the Chris- 
tian Life? 

The supreme factor in this question is 
life, and life of a unique character, 
created and sustained by the Christ of 
God. It is that life which is born of the 
Holy Spirit ; it is the Christ-ordained 
life for eveiy soul that is redeemed, for 
all things were made by Him and in Him 
all things cohere, so that behind this life 
is the creative power of God and under- 
neath it is the holding power of the 
infinite hand. 

The secondary factor in the question 
is secret society, a fraternal organization 
with certain severe limitations governing 
its membership. I am asked tonight to 
show, if possible, whether the relation- 
ship between the organization and the 
Christian life is helpful or not. I am not 
asked to show the cause without an in- 



vestigation ; to declare a judgment with- 
out searching for the facts. This is not 
a question in theoretical ethics, or philo- 
sophical theology. It is the question of 
an earnest mind, of a sensitive con- 
science, and of a seeking will. We want 
to know how to shape our lives in the 
light of present, urgent duty and of fu- 
ture and certain judgment. As I under- 
stand it, there must be no trifling, for 
he who trifles is a fool, and must perish 
in his folly. 

Xow first of all it is not my purpose 
to state the case of the lodge superlative- 
ly. I shall not search for the crooked 
stick and the fly in the ointment, and is- 
sue my argument on them. There are 
bad lodges and bad lodge members as 
there are bad governments and bad citi- 
zens in governments. Every lodge-man 
would side-step such an argument. He 
would freely admit the presence of un- 
desirable lodge members. If the lodge- 
man were to build up an argument 
against my church on a like basis I 
would side-step his argument. I would 
admit that there were members who 
fearfully misrepresent the church. Now 
we must admit these facts. Therefore, 
it is not my purpose to state the question 
of the Lodge superlatively or severely. 
In my statement of the Lodge. I shall be 
generous, more than that. I shall be 
positively benevolent. I shall accept the 
statement of my lodge friends at their 
full value. 

The germinal principle of the lodge is 
secrecy. It is the tap root of the lodge 
tree and determines its fruit. Without 
that germinal principle it would be a 
mere fraternal club, open and accessible 
to all men. The lodge isn't an accidental 
branch of the tree of fraternalism, lodge 
fraternalism is the branch on the root 
of secretism. Without it the lodge be- 
comes something different. 

It is quite true that there are differ- 
ing conditions and various qualities of 
these Associations and Orders, I am not 
going on the theory of the apothecary 
tonight, to find the acid test, or of the 
chemist to discover the fire test, but just 
how much of quantity and quality there 
may be of criticism in the lodge system. 
I am perfectly willing to take the state- 
ment that is made that, secrecv is the 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



69 



germinal principle of the whole system, 
and I am quite sure that that is true, and 
therefore I will accept that as funda- 
mental ; that the secretiveness of the 
lodge is the great root out of which this 
fruit must grow, and determine its 
quality. 

The advocates of the lodge system 
claim large fraternal good and this good 
finds various expressions. Now there 
are three varieties of fraternal good 
which are claimed by the advocates of 
the system. First of all there is a social 
good, expressing itself in friendship and 
comradeship. There is a magnifying of 
fellowship, and friendship which grows 
into comradeship so that there is an in- 
timacy of relationship between the 
brethren of the lodge. We grant it. And 
secondly, there is a beneficial good, using 
the term in the strict technical sense. 
There is a life insurance feature that 
earns certain benefits ; there is care for 
widows and children under certain cir- 
cumstances and conditions ; there is cer- 
tain advantage in business, as it is de- 
clared to us ; so that in the technical 
sense there is fraternal good coming out 
of the secret institution. And thirdly, 
there is ritual good, or religious good. 1 
have often had men declare to me in en- 
thusiastic phrase that the religion of the 
lodge was all that was necessary, the sole 
power to point back the man to God, and 
to develop his spiritual possibilities and 
•capabilities for the eternity that is to be. 
There are many modifications of this 
fraternal good, but 'roughly speaking, 
these are the principal ones. Now I am 
going to grant that much, just as he 
wants me to admit it, and I am going to 
ask him a question : What is the breadth 
of the distribution of these lodge bene- 
fits ? 

First we state them negatively. They 
are exclusive and not inclusive. They 
-are not universally offered, therefore, 
they never can become the common good 
-of humanity. They are not applicable 
to those who are in the direct need. They 
are not available to the financially and 
morally broken and ruined, therefore the 
lodge cannot become a rescuing, redeem- 
ing force. It is not applicable to a man 
who is broken ' in life and faith : to a 
person who has dropped beneath the so- 
cial standard in the communitv, and 



therefore, it can never become an up- 
lifting and redeeming force for the rest 
of mankind. 

Xow let us look at the case from an- 
other point of .view : First of all that this 
good of the lodge is severely limited to 
the few. It is absolutely guarded from 
the many as I have indicated before ; it 
is exclusive in its purpose, not inclusive. 
I think that is a fair statement of the 
case. Xot superlatively, not severely, 
but with every reasonable admission that 
may be claimed by the advocates of the 
system. 

Secondly, we state the breadth of the 
application of these lodge benefits posi- 
tively. 

1. They are severely limited to the 
few. 

2. They are jealously guarded from 
the many. 

3. They are used competitively, not 
co-operatively. That is, the good of the 
lodge-man first, last and always ; and all 
sense of the good of others excluded un- 
less humanitarian sentiments overcome 
lodge principles. But in such a case the 
credit is not due to the lodge, but to the 
milk of human kindness. This is the 
case of the lodge stated generously, not 
with superlative severity. 

Xow I want to turn to the statement 
of the case of the Christian life. I want 
to state it superlatively, because my 
blessed Lord stated it so. I want to state 
it severely, because the Christ who has 
redeemed and lifted us out of our" sins 
so declared it to us. He said, "Thou 
shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy 
heart, mind and strength." "Be ye there- 
fore perfect, as your Father who is in 
heaven is perfect." "If any man will 
come after me let him deny himself and 
take up his cross and follow me." "Thou 
shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." 
"Wherefore come out from among them 
and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and 
touch not the unclean things, and I will 
receive you, and I will be to you a fath- 
er, I will be to you a home, and you shall 
be to me sons and daughters, saith the 
Lord Almighty." 

These are high ideals — yes Alpine in 
their height : splendid in their splendor : 
glorious in their belief, and outreach. I 
do not believe any disciple has a right to 



70 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July. 1912. 



modify or change them. I will accept 
that program. The Christian life is more 
than a doctrine, more than a profession. 
1 think the Christian life is a process 
with a purpose. A stream ever flowing 
out to bless the world, and that brings 
good order. 

I take four words of the Christian 
life as a vocation. Come and see, go and 
tell. Come, one word; come away, come 
out. come away from, come to, come in- 
to, into fellowship with Christ. And see 
— that is taste and see ; appropriate and 
enter. Come and see. Then what? Go 
and tell. I myself think that after we 
have received the fulness of that life, 
that we are to go abroad and carry the 
message to those who need it every- 
where ; and we are to tell it forth. And 
how best can we effectively tell forth 
that message? "Let your light so shine 
before men that they shall see your good 
works, and glorify your Father which 
is in heaven." That is one great method 
of the declaration of Christian life, ft 
is the message which we have heard 
from Him, and have announced unto 
you, that in Him there is no secrecy at 
all. Xo secretiveness at all. No dark- 
ness at all. "If we say that we have 
fellowship with Him and walk in the 
darkness, we lie, and do not tell the 
truth ; but if we walk in the light as He 
is in the light, we have fellowship one 
with another, and the blood of Jesus 
Christ, his Son, cleanseth us from all 
sin.*' 

Yes, I grant you, brother, that is a 
pretty severe statement of the Christian 
life. That is stating it superlatively, and 
I think I have a right to so state it. 

( )ut of this life with Christ flows 
large spiritual good, with temporal and 
material manifestations. What is the 
breadth of the distribution of this good? 
It is inclusive not exclusive. The whole 
purpose of the church is to make Chris- 
tian good the common good. 

Paul said three things to Rome, facing 
both her majesty and power. I am 
debtor, I am ready, I am not ashamed. 
Debtor to the world to give Christ to 
them. Ready to face the world and 
• leath for Christ, and not ashamed of its 
power to redeem the world that is lost. 

Christianity is compassionate, not sel- 
fish good. It seeks to lift up the fallen, 



to redeem the lost — lost to virtue, lost 
to sobriety, lost to honesty. It has a 
message and a ministry to the "down 
and out." It accepts the divine princi- 
ple ; I am my brother's keeper. There 
is a kind of science that declares the sur- 
vival of. the fittest; that means the sur- 
vival of the fittest and the perishing of 
the unfittest, and it does mean to me 
what the doctrine of secrecy means ; the 
unfit shall have no place in the lodge. Is 
that not true? But blessed be God, the 
Christian life reaches down for the low- 
est. It reaches down to those lost to 
truth, lost to virtue, lost to hope and lifts 
up and redeems. Christian good is as 
broad as the lost world in its truest ap- 
plication. 

And then last of all. Christian good is 
used co-operatively and not competitive- 
ly. It does not look upon its own things 
but on the things of others. The good of 
the Christian life is intended to flow out 
without limitation, and with God's peace 
upon it, so that the trickling stream of 
God's grace may reach by and by the 
desert world and make it blossom like 
the rose. 

Now that is the statement of the two 
cases. I have stated the first case, not 
superlatively, not severely, but charit- 
ably. I have accepted my lodge friends' 
statements in toto. Is anything fairer? 
And then I have stated the case of the 
Christian life tremendously, severely and 
superlatively, and I am not asking any- 
one to accept merely a claim. Is that not 
fair and right? 

With the facts of the two cases before 
us, we are forced to ask three questions. 
If we are candid thinkers, we cannot 
avoid it and maintain our honesty. How 
can a disciple of Christ live according to 
the exclusive principle of the lodge and 
at the same moment according to the in- 
clusive principle of the gospel of Jesus 
Christ ? I am talking about ethical prin- 
ciples. I am talking of incarnate princi- 
ples in an actual life process. How can 
I live exclusiveness, and at the same mo- 
ment inclusiveness in Christ Jesus ? 

How can I conscientiously enjoy the 
good for which I have taken oath to 
keep from the many and for the few who 
have my pass-word, while at the same 
time I have taken oath and sealed it at 
the communion table before Him who is 



r«j 



1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYXOSURE. 



r: 



the Judge of the living and the dead, 
that I will take all the good I know and 
give it to all the people I know as long 
as I have opportunity ? 

How shall 1 regard as my neighbor 
onlv my lodge-mate and live the teach- 
ing of Jesus as revealed in the parable of 
the good Samaritan? Oh! my brother, 
I am not asking these questions to quib- 
ble. We cannot quibble with God or 
man. Immortal life and issues are too 
serious for that. How can we do these 
things ? I want to know, and you equally 
with me. 

This test comes to me over and over 
and I cannot refuse it place in my 
thought. Can I think of Jesus while on 
earth as having belonged to a secret so- 
ciety, however excellent some of its aims 
may have been ? No ! It is unthinkable to 
one who sees God's plan of the Ages. 

Can I think of the Apostles as having 
belonged to a secret society ? Xo ! It is 
unthinkable. The core of their gospel 
was not words, but their redeemed lives. 
If they had hidden them in secretiveness 
their gospel would have been no gospel 
at all. With that one limitation it would 
not have been a world-gospel. That 
would have sealed its final decay. Is 
there not peril that this will happen in 
the life of compromise to-day? 

Now i: is said. "If a man have not the 
spirit of Christ he is none of His." I 
want His spirit that I may be with Him. 
and that I may be like Him, and that I 
may win the world or help to win the 
world for Him. 

Xow my last word is this : I must not 
trespass on others' time. I want to give 
you an opportunity to prove the state- 
ment under consideration with these 
principles. The tap root of the lodge is 
secretiveness and the fruit partakes of 
the quality of the root, selfishness and 
secrecy. 

- Xow I may cultivate every noble 
Christian fruit, and may possess every 
tender Christian grace and still I have 
no privilege of entering into that little 
secret group — that is. not without the 
pass-word. Why not? Because to en- 
ter there I must put upon my life the 
limitation of a solemn compact to hold 
back the good I get from some of my 
fellow men. I want to submit to you 
thinking men the thought that the lim- 



ited good never becomes universal, and 
the good that is never to become univer- 
sal must ultimately pass and perish, and 
that is the condemnation of the lodge 
system. 

Now the tap root of the Christian sys- 
tem, as I understand it. to use a figure. 
is love. At least I want the privilege of 
that figure. It is love ; and what is the 
sphere of the quality of the root? I think 
two fruits are these : The fruit of light 
and the fruit of love. It is the very na- 
ture of the fruit of love and light to be- 
come universal, and in becoming univer- 
sal they become sacrificial, and being 
sacrificial they will win. the world. 

John Henry George says the greatest 
things of today are the sacrificial things 
of yesterday and I hold no greater truth 
was ever uttered by him. The sacrificial 
things of yesterday are the influential 
things of today and when light and 
Christian love become universal, they 
become sacrificial. 

Now the ultimate end or issue of the 
lodge system is intellectual, moral and 
spiritual suffocation. Where secrecy is 
there is death. But the ultimate end of 
the Christian life is glorious spiritual 
liberty ; the liberty of fellowship in sacri- 
fice, and fellowship with the spirits of 
men made perfect in Him. 

Have I answered my question? Hear 
me a moment. Is membership in a se- 
cret society helpful to the Christian life? 
I am not talking to the men of the world 
now. I would be very pleased to speak 
to them under other conditions — I am 
talking to the man who says, my body, 
my mind, my soul is not my own. they 
have been bought with a price. Xow is 
that relationship that can never become 
universal in its purpose, never become re- 
demptive in its issue, is that helpful to 
a walk with God? My brother, it does 
not seem so to me. I stood in that great 
conservation Congress of Xew York and 
listened to that line of great speaker-, 
and every man came back to this posi- 
tion — and some of them are not very 
orthodox — they said the solution oi the 
social question, the solution of the po- 
litical question, the solution of interna- 
tional peace question, the solution of the 
slums of the city, must all be found 
ultimately in the hand that bears the 
mark of the nail. Whv o\ course, that 



72 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1912. 



is sound. Now what I feel like doing, 
and what you should do, is this : That 
you and I before God, a few men, but in 
perfect liberty, should lift up that old 
banner with its crimson stain, in the 
name of the King, and in a very at- 
mosphere of heaven shout our victorious 
notes with triumph in this crusade, in 
this work of winning humanity to Christ. 



LETTERS TO THE CONVENTION 



MRS. ANNA E. STODDARD. 
Boston. Mass., April 29, 1912. 
My prayers will be for and with you. 
I should very mtfch like to be there in 
person, but that is impossible. I enclose 
a trifle towards expenses, and wish it 
might have been more. Remember me 
to all friends, and extend my greetings 
to the convention and also those of the 
X. E. C. A. 

Axxe E. Stoddard, Secy- 



MR. E. BRACE. 

Sawtelle, Cal., May 3, 1912. 

I am still with the cause and I hope 
and pray that the Association and all its 
workers may be blessed of God and that 
each and every one may be blessed 
abundantly. Inclosed please find $5.00 
for the work and may the Lord bless it 
to the sowing of some good seed. 

I have used tracts and all other means 
at my hands to help put down secretism. 
I give the Cyxosure away as soon as I 
have read it. I have not a copy in the 
house except the one just received. 

E. Brace. 



MRS. C. A. JOHNSON. 

Comrey. Alta., Canada, Apr. 22, 1912. 

I have no criticisms to give and I think 
those at work will see the best way. I 
certainly will pray for the workers, and 
those they are working for. I will send 
S2. 00 for the work. I think the Cyno- 
sure is improving. I always read it 
through, and enjoy it. 

Mrs. C. A. Johnson. 



A member living in the state of Mis- 
souri asks this question, "When the 
devil said to Christ, 'All this power will 
I give thee, and the glorv of them :■ for 
that is delivered unto me ; and to whom- 
soever I will, I give it. If thou therefore 



wilt worship me, all shall be thine/ did 
the devil tell the truth? The worship 
of secret societies is the worship of Sa- 
tan, and the lodge rules the earth. That 
the 'earth is the Lord's and the fullness 
thereof was written under another dis- 
pensation. They who oppose secret so- 
cieties cannot expect to prosper in mate- 
rial things. When a hero like the late 
J. M. Hitchcock goes home he should 
receive the credit that is due the great 
and good. 'Lives of great men oft re- 
mind us' — but they won't remind us un- 
less they are held up before us." 



MR. JOHN BRADLEY. 

Wyanet, 111., May 6, .1912. 

I am with you with all my might. We 
will not be able to send a delegate for 
there are not many souls here that take 
stock in anti-masonry, though there are 
a few. Sometimes I can imagine old 
Elijah's feelings when he was on Mount 
Carmel. 

I suppose you know that I am a se- 
ceder from the O. F. I often look back 
forty years ago, and rejoice that I ever 
met with the Blanchards and Stoddards 
and Hinmans and Ronaynes, for they 
helped me out of darkness into light. 
God bless you and give a glorious meet- 
ing. . John Bradley. 

Air. E. C. Mason, Publishing Agent 
of the U. B. Publishing Establishment,. 
Huntington. Indiana, sent greetings to< 
the annual meeting in which he makes 
an interesting play upon his name 
"Mason." 

I bid you God speed in the great move- 
ment in which we are engaged. It seems, 
very inconsistent for one who has been 
and always will be a Mason to take so- 
much interest in the advancement of a 
movement which would annihilate the 
whole masonic system ! But to the unini- 
tiated there is a great difference between 
being a free and accepted Mason in 
Jesus Christ our Lord by divine grace 
and providence, and being a speculative 
Mason, hoodwinked, cable towed and 
sworn to conceal and never reveal that 
which destroys manhood, perverts jus- 
tice and is a travesty on the Christian 
religion. Yours for truth and Him 
"who ever spake openly and in secret 
said nothing." E. C. Mason. 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



73 



FROM LIZZIE WOODS ROBERSON. 

I expect to work next year (1912- 
1913) in Texas, Virginia, Missouri and 
Mississippi, if the Lord wills that I live, 
and I don't mind becoming a member of 
the Association if you all think I am 
worthy to belong to God's family who 
will give their lives for God and His 
work. I feel like an unprofitable serv- 
ant, yet according to my ability I will do 
what I can. Pray for me. I am going 
to tell the truth till I die. I told my hus- 
band that if I am killed to let you know 
that I died on the field for Jesus. 



LET US EDUCATE. 

Ubee, Ind., June 7, 1912. 
Dear Bro. Phillips : 

I certainly rejoice with you over the 
splendid convention that was held in 
Chicago, and hope that we shall see more 
-and more signs indicating that the secret 
•empire is indeed weakening. We just 
closed a very successful convention of 
the United Brethren Christian Endeavor 
Society. The convention was held here 
in College Park and the anti-secrecy 
phase thereof was sufficiently prominent. 
On Wednesday evening Pres. Blanchard, 
of Wheaton College, gave an excellent 
address on Modern Secret Societies. Be- 
sides this address by Pres. Blanchard, 
•other convention speakers gave no un- 
certain sound on the lodge evil as their 
various themes offered occasion. 

A neighbor, who is a member of one 
•or two lodges, remarked to me that Pres. 
Blanchard's lecture was all right. Bro. 
Phillips, this work must be pushed. By 
kind, yet faithful presentation of the 
truth, men and women should be in- 
structed and persuaded to abandon the 
secret lodges. Some use the term agi- 
tate ; I prefer to say, "Let us educate the 
people." 

Wishing you abundant blessing from 
God and grand success in your sphere of 
labor. I remain, 

Yours truly, 
(Prof.) Moses H. Clemens. 



REV. ALEXANDER THOMSON. 

Endeavor, Wis., May 16, 1912. 

Mr. W. I. Phillips: As I do not now 

^expect to be able to attend the annual 

meeting, I send this greeting and God's 

speed to my brethren in the good work. 



There seems to me to be two principal 
mountain barriers in the way of our 
progress. First, the cheap fraternal in- 
surance societies ; and second, a lodge- 
locked door to the public mind. How to 
break the power of the first, and open 
the second is of the utmost importance. 
The really deadly secret lodges like ma- 
sonry have in our day little to do in self 
defense. They are defended by such a 
strong outer line of cheap insurance 
breastworks. We are not like the Roman 
Catholics, opposed only to lodges that 
interfere with the Confessional, but to 
the whole Secret Empire — to all the 
lodges, large and small. We believe they 
rest upon wrong principles, cultivate a 
clannish spirit, and interfere with God's 
great law of merit. But the fraternal in- 
surance lodges offer the bait of cheap in- 
surance and all that appeals to the love 
of mystery, office and ribbons, so dear to 
general humanity. When, therefore, any 
attack is made upon any part of the sys- 
tem, out rush these wasps of the Lodge 
in defense of the whole system. They 
are but involved in the darker systems. 
There are many men of almost every 
church in their membership, and they 
stand boldly between us and such lodges 
as the masonic. What can we do? One 
thing plainly. Make clear to the people 
the delusion of this cheap insurance. 
Show the people the truth that the Fra- 
ternal Insurance Societies are a lottery 
where only the hand of an early death 
can draw a prize, and that to most oth- 
ers when they are old and need a staff 
to lean upon, the lodge staff will break 
in their hands. This can be abundantly 
proved. Let us make the most of this 
proof. 

But how shall we force the lodge- 
locked church door with press, pulpit, 
platform — all practically closed against 
us ? He who departeth from evil in his 
own denomination maketh himself a 
prey to the wolf pack of the lodges. This 
is indeed a most serious and difficult 
question, and one in which we need 
more than human wisdom. Two things 
I know we want — more money, and 
more tents for summer work. God send 
the spirit of liberality into the hearts of 
those who know, and who have to give. 
With even twenty thousand dollars to 
spend, much could be accomplished. 



74 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Tuly. 1912. 



Halls could be rented, the meetings 
largely advertised, and many of those 
who do not now know might hear the 
truth. Again, if we had a number of 
large tents with competent teachers to 
travel with them, there is no doubt but 
that many who can be reached in no 
other way, would become acquainted 
with the danger to family, church and 
state that exists in the lodge system. 

Brethren, the paralyzing, threatening, 
deadly power of the lodge is not at all 
understood by our people. God grant 
you wisdom to help let in the light. 

Alexander Thomson. 



REV. G. A. PEGRAM. 

Parral, W. Ya., May 21, 1912. 
Mr. W. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

My Dear Brother : I wrote you a let- 
ter the other day, a part of which you 
might read to the convention, but I did 
not have time to offer any recommenda- 
tions, as you requested. Will give some 
now. 

1st. Arrange some plans to advertise 
the literature more fully and systematic- 
ally than ever before. 2d. Arrange to 
put more literature in the church and 
Sunday Schools, as well as in secular 
schools and homes. 3d. Have some of 
those weaker tracts scattered free and 
widely till used up and then have some 
good strong ones printed in their place. 
Have some experts write on different 
subjects, possibly in a contest. Print the 
very best as tracts, and good ones as 
articles in the Cynosure. I will give 
live dollars to help have some better 
tracts printed, provided it is done, and 
all provided for. 4th. Have tracts all 
numbered as well as named, so men can 
order by number. Have the catalogue of 
tracts and books arranged systematically 
in catalogue style, and not as a para- 
graph of prose, so that one may check 
just what he wants. 5th. Can't more 
subscriptions for the Cynosure be ob- 
tained if club rates and combinations 
with other papers are offered — the 
Cynosure and Free Methodist for so 
much — the Cynosure and Observer for 
so much, etc. I know we are handi- 
capped in some ways, but it does seem 
to me that more could be done. 6th. 
Elect officers and directors just as widely 



as possible from various places and de- 
nominations. 7th. I think the Cyno- 
sure is improving, but it might be made 
stronger still. Have seceders from some 
lodge give their reasons why thev left, 
the salient features from different ones 
of the same lodge in symposium form. 
Have one issue devoted to Masonry and 
another to Oddfellowship. I know it is 
hard for a small office force to do every- 
thing, but I believe we ought to be more 
aggressive and progressive too. 

Give my regards to all comrades. 
G. A. Pegram. 



REV. HENRY J. BECKER, D. D. 

Davton, Ohio, April 30, 191 2. 
Wm. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother : Yours of the 30th ult., 
and of the 27th inst., are here. I fully 
appreciate the difficulties of which you 
speak. I am so situated at the present 
that I could not hold an anti-secrecy 
convention in the church of which I am 
pastor, however much I might insist up- 
on it. It would mean my resignation 
were I to press it too strongly. Secret 
societies in Dayton are increasing with 
such rapidity that they have to consult 
the ( animal ) kingdom to get names of 
sufficient appropriateness to christen 
them all. They have the Elks, the Bears, 
the Owls, the Snakes. I am looking for 
the crocodiles, the lizards, the plethios- 
aurus to join the "Eagles," the vultures, 
the vampires and the centipedes, may be, 
the asps and the scorpions. Who know- 
eth where this plot of Satan will hold 
its final convention for the overthrow of 
the Church of Jesus Christ? Oh, that 
men were w T ise and fully consecrated to 
God. 

'May, 1889, the Church of The United 
Brethren in Christ divided. Primative- 
ly speaking, secret societies was the in- 
hering cause of its dissolution. If at the 
time it was undergoing the sacrifices and 
sufferings which came to those who re- 
fused to trample under foot the princi- 
ples of Phillip William Otterbein and 
Martin Boehm ; if at the period of its 
defense of its anti-secrecy principles; if 
when the liberal faction of the church 
determined to overthrow the restrictive 
rule against secret societies and allow 
hordes of men and women to come into 
its ranks and assist them in the utter an- 



July, 191. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



7'r 



nihilation of the former testimony 
against the lodge and its pernicious in- 
fluences, if then, they could have had 
the concentrated forces and united ac- 
tion of the Anti-secrecy Association and 
the practical sympathy of all of the 
churches in the land opposed to the 
lodge, that church would have won her 
battle and would today sail as one 
united whole, and would be able to send 
the greetings of a half-million conse- 
crated men and women to your con- 
vention. 

That mighty conflict in which there 
were arrayed two hundred thousand peo- 
ple, was to be the Waterloo of the Devil 
against the combined forces of anti-se- 
crecyism. The conservatists did not re- 
treat, nor were they driven front the bat- 
tlefield. They were locked out of their 
churches, driven from their parsonages, 
maligned and slandered, made a spec- 
tacle to the world. The liberal party 
entered the courts of the land and used 
the influence of the lodge to aid them to 
win their cause. The minority within 
twelve years built above five hundred 
churches and parsonages. Some wor- 
shipped in sheds, stables, barns, the 
homes of the people and under the 
boughs of the forests. God met them 
there. He heard them sing : 

"Jesus, we our cross have taken 
All to leave and follow Thee; 
Naked, poor, despised, forsaken. 
Thou from hence our all shall be." 

The old church still lives. She strug- 
gles still. But for the encamping angel 
of the Lord she would long since have 
perished. Let her not perish. Let this 
convention take action to inquire into 
her present status by men from her ranks 
who will be there. Let the world know 
that they are entitled to the sympathy of 
all who are truly engaged in this great 
work of reform. Let the antisecrecy 
churches keep in touch with the noble 
heroes that passed through the death 
valley of that struggle, and who this 
day refuse threats, emoluments, posi- 
tions of worldly honor, rather than yield 
the principles and practices so dear to 
them all. 

I had not intended to say so much re- 
garding the matter. But when T tell you 
that the attitude taken by some who 
claim to be antisecrecv men, saying that 



the minority should have submitted to 
the majority and then afterward kept up 
a voice against the lodge, then it will ap- 
pear that such a step would have been 
futile. The majority would soon have 
hushed every voice, and not an antise- 
crecy man would have been given a field 
of labor or a sphere of action. The 
method of Christ is to come out from 
among them and be a separate people. 
We are not to have fellowship with such 
men, unless it be to bring them in touch 
with divine truth. One can only take 
the form of sinful flesh that he may con- 
demn sin in the flesh. 

Bear with me while I offer some sug- 
gestions which for aught I know, may 
now be in operation in the association, 
i. There ought to be taken into consid- 
eration a plan of work which contem- 
plates reaching secret society men and 
women throughout the land. 2. A new, 
recently dated expose of secretism ought 
to be published. Some one competent 
for such an undertaking ought to be se- 
lected to write, and after he had com- 
pleted the manuscript, it should go to the 
executive committee for review, correc- 
tions, suggestions, etc., and then come 
back to the convention for consideration, 
approval and distribution. 3. There 
ought to be an arrangement by which 
the agents, lecturers, officials of the asso- 
ciation could meet representatives of an- 
tisecret churches and individuals in sym- 
pathy with their work and have inter- 
views with them as to the more practical 
methods to confront the influences of 
the lodge in particular communities. 
These agents would be able to introduce 
the literature of the association, and 
while in the community get facts that 
would meet the particular obstructions 
to the work of the church there located. 
whose mission could be more effective 
by such uniformity of action as would 
strengthen the cause at large, and such 
conformity of action as would adapt the 
lines of work to the peculiarities of the 
place. 

To the first of these I would suggest 
getting the addresses of lodge men. their 
order, the particular phase of their con- 
duct to the detriment of the cause of 
Christ. Such knowledge sent to the agent 
at Chicago, would at once cause him to 
send at the expense of the inquirer, ap- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1912.. 



propriate literature to the persons named. 
The inquirer himself having a copy of 
such literature could readily take notes 
of the effect of the literature upon his 
fellow. The plan would also later bring 
personal letter writing into place. These 
letters could always be written from 
neighboring communities. They would 
deal with the same matters contained in 
the literature sent out, the writer know- 
ing the nature of it as sent to the individ- 
ual to whom he addressed himself. Each 
church having a special committee on 
correspondence, would take full charge 
of it and see to it that a system was ob- 
served that meant harmony and ef- 
ficiency. 

As to the second suggestion, I have in 
thought the numerous new organizations 
that need exposing and can easily be 
ventilated by the association. Also the 
need of a new expose of Masonry, I. O. 
O. F., K. of P., etc. Greater and more 
potential than the mere exposing of the 
secrets of these, is the bringing to light 
their heterodoxies, their blasphemies, 
their claims to antiquity. Ministers of 
any orthodox church who would preach 
for doctrine the commandments of these 
lodges, would be tried for heresy. Let- 
ters written to general conferences, as- 
semblies, convocations, and to annual 
conferences, synods, associations, etc., 
setting forth the doctrines held by minis- 
ters of the particular church in his rela- 
tion with the lodge, would soon set all 
Gath into inquiry and the agitation 
would result in personal injury as to the 
correctness of the assertions, accusations, 
charges. 

My third suggestion is intended to 
make the above practical for immediate 
operation. For instance, I am acquainted 
with a minister of this city who would 
gladly arrange with an agent to hold a 
counsel with the view of doing that 
which would be the most effective way 
of meeting the encroachments of the 
lodge upon his church. This minister is 
acquainted with other ministers in the 
city who would gladly meet such agent 
for a personal counsel. These ministers 
have a large number of men and women 
in their churches who would be ready to 
engage in a carefully provided plan — a 
plan which recognized their several en- 
vironments and nevertheless had use for 



them in relations where their influence 
would be helpful. I know one man in 
this city, who if he could be taken into 
counsel, would be so formidable a host 
as to chase a thousand and put its square 
in numbers to flight. The agent comes 
not to lecture at this time. Nor does he 
come heralded in public print, but comes 
openly as a man of business for the 
Master. He registers at the hotel, or is 
taken into the homes of the people. He 
holds his counsel, sets to working plans 
to enlighten benighted souls, pleads with 
the one in error, leaves literature for cir- 
culation, puts the antisecrecy people in 
communication with the general agent at 
Chicago, places matters into the hands of 
local churches that will make them bold 
to disseminate the truth and lead their 
blinded brethren to renounce the hidden 
works of darkness. This agent could la- 
ter arrange for lectures, debates, doc- 
trinal discussions of the heterodoxies of 
secret society ritualism. Matter of de- 
tail would develop. 

I am not in a position to attend the 
convention. I will continue to do what 
I can to maintain the views I have all 
my life held against all organized se- 
cresy. ( Rev.) Henry J. Becker. 



Letters to the annual meeting were re- 
ceived from the following members, ex- 
tracts from which will appear in the 
June and July numbers of the Cynosure : 

Bishop Milton Wright, Dayton, Ohio. 

James M. Gray, D. D., Chicago, 111, 

Rev. L. G. Almen, Carthage, S. D. 

Prof. Elliot Whipple, Pasadena, Cal. 

President N. E. Byers, Goshen, Ind. 

Mr. Joseph P. Shaw, Wheaton, 111. 

Rev. B. E. Bergesen, Seattle, Wash. 

Rev. David S. Faris, Sparta, 111. 

Rev. E. Y. Woolley, Chicago, 111. 

Rev. L. V. Harrell, South Haven, 
Mich. 

Rev. G. M. Robb, Almonte, Ontario. 

Evangelist Wm. S. Jacoby, Guthrie 
Center, Iowa. 

Miss Rufina Fry, Ligonier, Ind. 

Rev. O. T. Lee, Northwood, Iowa. 

William Doyle, Summitville, Ind. 

E. L. Thompson, Geneva, 111. 

Mrs. F. H. Frink, Naples, N. Y. 

J. C. Young, Degolia, Pennsylvania. 

J. T. Cullor, Sapulpa, Okla. 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



77 



Mrs. Alary P. Morris, Roxbury, Ohio. 

A. Augspurger, Saybrook, 111. 

J. Groen, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Elder A. B. Lipp, Stahl, Mo. 

Rev. A. H. Leaman, Chicago, 111. 

Rev. E. J. Tartis, Kenosha, Wis. 

Rev. A. R. Merrill, Williamston, Mich. 

Rev. Alex. Thomson, Endeavor, Wis. 

Rev. J. J. Hiemenga, Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

H. L. Kellogg, Clearing, 111. 

Hedda Worcester, Stillman Valley, 
111. 

Airs. Sarah R. Dawson, North To- 
peka, Kan. 

Rev. Win. Dillon, Huntington, Ind. 

Airs. E. M. Rull. Star Prairie, Wis. 

Airs. M. E. McKee, Clarinda, Iowa. 

Rev. & Airs. W. O. Dinius, Seattle, 
Wash. 

T. H. Brenneman, Goshen, Ind. 

S. O. Irvine, Eden, Alanitoba, Can. 

Amanda Smith, Harvey, 111. 

Rev. I. A. Sommer, Berne, Ind. 

L. G. Bears, Albion, Ind. 

Air. and Airs. A. G. Johnson, Hunting- 
ton, Ind. 

E. C. Alason. Huntington, Ind. 

Hon. J. A. Conant, Willimantic. Conn. 

Rev. James Stickel, Toledo, Iowa. 

Pres. H. H. George, Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Rev. G. AI. Elliott, D. D., St. Augus- 
tine, Florida. 

Rev. I. R. Alillin, Oklahoma City, 
Okla. 

Henry J. Becker, Dayton, Ohio. 

Mrs. Anna E. Stoddard, Boston, Alass. 

Air. E. Brace, Sawtelle, Cal. 

Air. John Bradley, Wyanet, 111. 

J. C. Berg, Scottdale, Pa. 

Airs. C. A. Johnson, Conrey, Alta., 
Canada. 

Air. George Windle, Alount Alorris. 
111. 

Rev. S. F. Sprunger, Berne, Ind. 

Rev. C. D. Trumbull. Alorning Sun, 
Iowa. 

Rev. I. B. Gallowav, Povnette, Wis. 



BUSINESS MEETING. 



What indeed does not that word 
"cheerfulness" imply? It means a con- 
tented spirit ; it means a pure heart ; it 
means a kind, loving disposition ; it 
means humility and charity ; it means a 
generous appreciation of others and a 
modest opinion of self. — Thackeray. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS' REPORT. 

The field work has been as extensive 
as the funds available have permitted. 
Our agents have lectured and labored in 
Pennsylvania, Wisconsin. Illinois, Indi- 
ana, Alichigan. Ohio, Nebraska, Tennes- 
see, Alassachusetts. Louisiana, Texas, 
West Virginia, District of Columbia, 
New York, New Jersey, and Virginia. 
There has been much valuable service 
performed, and we believe highly ap- 
preciated, other than by our regular paid 
agents and it has covered other states 
and fields. There comes to our mind at 
this writing. President Blanchard. Rev. 
G. A. Pegram, Evangelist J. L. Davis, 
Rev. B. E. Bergesen, Rev. form Nelson, 
Rev. C. G. Fait, Prof. M. H. Clemens, 
Air. Joseph P. Graybell, and others 
whose names do not occur to us at this 
writing, with whom we have co-operated 
as far as possible through correspond- 
ence and the furnishing of tracts. We 
nearly forgot to mention Airs. Lizzie 
Woods Roberson, whose abundant labors 
are well known to the readers of the 
Cynosure and who has been a signal 
blessing to her people, greater we are 
sure than can be estimated. 

Several states were pretty thoroughly 
reached through the pastors of the vari- 
ous denominations to whom special num- 
bers of the Cvxosure were sent. In 
many instances this work bore known 
fruit in the securing of valuable sub- 
scriptions to our magazine and frequent- 
ly resulting in an order for literature. 

It has seemed to us that never before 
have the various church papers been as 
friendly and published so extensively 
along the line of our work, as during the 
past year, which has added greatly to 
the amount of testimony and the num- 
ber of people reached. We have appre- 
ciated the kindly feelings that have been 
shown from time to time by these publi- 
cations and have rejoiced in the more 
widely reaching service that has been 
thus given to our country. 

The courage and persistency of the 
various school boards of our land against 
the High School Fraternities and the 
backing which they have received by 
the public press in editorials and bv the 
associated press in its widely circulated 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1912. 



statements of the determined light be- 
ing made against these school pests, has 
been remarkable ; and while our associa- 
tion can take but partial credit for this 
great work, it can rejoice in it and we are 
sure without our work during the past 
quarter of a century, and the various 
auxiliaries who have co-operated with 
us. there would have been no such grand 
results as above indicated. 

When our current year began the 
lodge was still continuing its efforts to 
throttle free speech through legislative 
action. It is well to keep in mind these 
various attempts because "eternal vigi- 
lance is the price of liberty.'' There is 
no doubt but that the law would have 
passed and become effective in Nebraska 
except for the protests which we sent 
out to the readers of the Cynosure and 
others in sympathy with us. 

The Christian Cynosure has had a 
circulation of over 40,000 numbers dur- 
ing the past year — an average of a little 
more than 3,400 per month. It has gone 
into 46 states regularly and into Canada 
and 5 other foreign countries. The 
State of Pennsylvania leads in the num- 
ber of subscribers. It is followed by 
Ohio and Illinois. Wyoming is the small- 
est, it having only one subscriber. We 
urge the friends to "boost"' the lists in 
their respective states. 

Your Board desires nothing perhaps, 
so much as the power to open the eyes 
of our friends to the great value of the 
Cynosure in thwarting Lodge efforts 
against state and church, so that 100,000 
copies of our magazine might be our 
monthly circulation. Our friends could 
give us such a list. We believe it would 
pay the people in dollars and cents. 
Where the lodge rules it not only at- 
tempts to shut out information, but it 
directly affects and increases the taxes 
of the people. Mr. Cline of Kentucky re- 
ported through the Cynosure of cases 
in that state where lodge property was 
exempted from taxation contrary to the 
plain statute of the state ; and not long 
since in the courts of Iowa it was de- 
cided that a bequest to the Masonic 
Lodge was not liable to the inheritance 
tax, because it was a charitable organiza- 
tion ! With Masons in office not only will 
taxes be higher but our liberties will be 



endangered in other ways. For instance, 
consider the act of the weak and com- 
plaisant Gov. West, of Oregon, when he 
signed the bill in that state forbidding 
the sale of exposures, etc., though the 
bill was contrary to the Constitution 
which he had sworn to uphold, as well 
as contrary to the Constitution of the 
United States. We cannot but empha- 
size again our belief that if the friends 
in sympathy with us realized how they 
are injured financially and their liberties 
threatened by these Lodge efforts 
through our legislatures, they would 
come up by the hundred thousands to 
the support of the Cynosure which has 
borne such an honorable and important 
part in defeating these attacks in the 
past. 

We have secured openings in the East 
and West into more Bible Schools and 
Theological Seminaries this year, than 
usual. The students in most of these 
schools were greatly interested in the ad- 
dresses given, and words of approval 
were heard from Dr. Davis, President 
of the Congregational Theological Sem- 
inary, and from Dr. Weidner of the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary and oth- 
ers. We were especially encouraged by 
the kindly sentiment and sympathy of- 
fered by the Deans of such schools as 
could not arrange their program this 
year for an address by one of our speak- 
ers. 

The movement in Houghton Wesley an 
Seminary, inaugurated by Prof. H. M. 
Smith, a former agent of this Associa- 
tion, and others, in order to send out the 
students as intelligent workers in this re- 
form, is an effort that we have encour- 
aged as opportunity afforded. It is a 
very important undertaking in our judg- 
ment and one that in some way should 
be patterned after by other Seminaries. 

The late Rev. Edward Hildreth, at 
one time Treasurer of this Association, 
bequeathed a certain amount to be used 
each year in furnishing some of our 
standard works to the graduates of the 
Chicago ( Congregational ) Theological 
Seminary, and other theological schools. 
More than one hundred students have 
been supplied this year. President Mc- 
Clure of the Presbyterian Theological 
School chose "Modern Secret Societies," 



My, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYXOSURE. 






by President Blanchard, for his students, 
saying that he had read the book and 
preferred it. President Davis of the 
Congregational Seminary of this city 
recommended to his students that they 
secure both "'Modern Secret Societies." 
and President Finney's book on "Ma- 
sonry." A large graduating class of the 
Moody Bible Institute was furnished 
with copies of "Modern Secret Socie- 
ties." 

This fund should be enlarged. Is it 
not an interesting fact that Brother Hii- 
dreth still speaks, year by year, through 
these books to a -large number of the 
rising leaders of our churches? 

Your Board of Directors have done 
the best that they could this year with a 
rather difficult proposition, namely, the 
renting of the unused portion of the Car- 
penter building, our headquarters, at 850 
West Madison street. 

It is needless to go into the reasons 
why a fair rental value could not be ob- 
tained. The rents, however, have a little 
more than paid expenses, notwithstand- 
ing that the taxes are one-third higher 
than heretofore. We are expecting bet- 
ter times. We recommend that steps be 
undertaken to secure within the next 
few years, a new and modern building 
which shall cover the whole lot owned by 
the Association, and which shall be sev- 
eral stories higher than the present 
building. Such a modern building will 
be easilv rentable we believe, and will in- 
jure an income in years to follow that 
will greatly help the work of the Asso- 
ciation. Friends have heretofore made 
the needed thing possible by their con- 
tributions and sacrifice and we believe 
they will in this case if appealed to. 

The Board of Directors of the Na- 
tional Christian Association desire to ex- 
press their appreciation of the virile life 
and distinguished services rendered to 
our cause and other forms of Christian 
activity by Mr. Ezra A. Cook and Mr. J. 
M. Hitchcock, recently promoted to the 
Paradise of God. 

Mr. Cook was a charter member of 
the National Christian Association, and 
a member of the Board of Directors up 
to the year of his sickness and death. He 
commenced the publication of the Chris- 
tian Cvxosure in Tulv, i860, at 88 La- 



Salle street. Chicago. Hi< attitude was 
always fearless', and the influence of his 
publications has been far reaching. 

Mr. Cook and his wife who survives 
him. never missed attending the annual 
meeting of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation during all the long years past, un- 
til last year, at which time Mr. Cook'> 
illness prevented. 

This is an unusual record of .-ingle- 
hearted devotion to an unpopular cause. 

Mr. Hitchcock was, from the begin- 
ning of the work of the National Chris- 
tian Association, one of its tried and 
faithful friends, and was, at the time of 
his death, a member of the Board of Di- 
rectors, and for many years previous, 
one of the officers of the Association. It 
is safe to say that there has never been 
a man connected with our work who was 
more self sacrificingly devoted to it than 
he. Trained as he was in church ser- 
vice under President Finney and Mr. 
Moody, two of the greatest evangelists 
of the world, it is not remarkable that 
he should have been the sort of man that 
he was. 

The marked power of every evil is 
largely due to the union of the world 
and the church. This is especially true 
of the Lodge in this country. Thousand- 
of nominal church members and Chris- 
tian ministers come to its aid with their 
talents, influence and money, without 
which the Lodge could do comparatively 
little harm. But. notwithstanding this 
fact, how greatly has the influence of 
the Lodge been broken in the last forty 
years ? Think of the social and com- 
mercial and physical dread inspired by 
Masonry at that time, and mark how 
free from mobs and violence are our 
meetings today. Then, men were loathe 
to have it known that they disfavored 
any kind of a secret society. Now. every 
community has its seceders. who are 
willing for Christ's sake to advise their 
neighbors publicly. God be praised! 

"Fear not. little flock: for it is your 
Father's good pleasure to give you the 
Kingdom." 



"Kindness is catching, and if you go 
around with a thoroughly Je\ eloped case 
your neighbors will be sure to get it. Be 
kind, one to another." 



so 



C HRI ST J AN CYNOSURE.. 



July, 1912. 



THE MAN-TRAP. 

BY REV. J. R. MILLIN. 

A foolish sportsman he would be who 
would try to take live game without bait. 
There is always "something good" on 
the fisherman's hook, but the fish pays a 
high price to get it. There is always 
"something good'' in the mouse trap for 
the mouse, but the little fool gets it in 
the neck while it gets its bit of cheese. 
There is always "something good" in the 
fox trap, but the fox goes after it at cost 
of its freedom or its life. "Come into 
my parlor," says the spider to the fly. 
The spider's lodge "looks good" to the 
fly, and the fly accepts the courtesy with 
disastrous consequences to itself. The 
bear sees "something good" in the bear 
trap. The bear gets that and loses itself. 
A foolish sportsman he would be who 
would fail to put "something good" on 
his hooks or in his traps. 

The Apostle Paul declares, "We are 
not ignorant of Satan's devices" (2 Cor. 
2:11). The Apostle's pronoun "we" 
seems to include comparatively few peo- 
ple. The greater number are easy game 
for Satan. The "devices" of Satan are 
placed everywhere, each advertising 
"something good" and, against the Apos- 
tle's faithful warning, the multitudes are 
ensnared. Satan, an expert fisherman, 
never forgets to bait his hooks with 
"something good," and — and he must 
smile to see his dupes come in "schools" 
to nibble at his bait. (Is there one kind 
of fish taken without bait?) Nor can 
anyone convict Satan of failing to place 
in his traps something that "looks good." 
But surely Satan himself, upon visiting 
his traps, must take on at once a leer of 
satisfaction and a mocking smile of 
amazement and derision when he sees his 
catch. The secret lodge system is one 
of Satan's man-traps, and a very danger- 
ous and successful one. The success of 
it is a sad commentary on the ignorance 
and the folly and the vanity and the 
wickedness of humanity in all grades. 
Do we smile or sigh to see the dumb ani- 
mal, enticed by "something good," run 
into the sportsman's trap at cost of lib- 
erty of life ? What shall we say of men 
and women, who, "though warned by dan- 
ger calls and signals, run into Satan's 
trap, the secret lodge, to be laughed at 
by Satan himself ? 



The secret lodge makes its appeal to 
human weakness. It lives and thrives 
upon human weakness ; and it makes hu- 
man weakness weaker. By false lights 
and strange diversions it cunningly con- 
ceals the sources of strength. It is not 
too much to say that the secret lodge sys- 
tem is a Social University adapted to the 
cultivation of human selfishness and van- 
ity and pride, and hence adapted to hurt 
or destroy God's three social institutions 
for mankind : the home, the state and the 
church. Who with eyes to see can not 
see in the secret lodge system the "black 
hand" of Satan? These three institu- 
tions are marked for destruction. Satan 
skillfully sets his trap, the lodge, for in- 
dividuals, with an evil eye on these three 
divine institutions. The lodge is an in- 
sult to the home. It is an insult to the 
state. But will Satan lay his black hand 
upon the church? He, who was impu- 
dent enough to ask the Son of God to 
worship him will think it great sport to 
ruin the church if he can. What he 
failed to do directly through the "Tempt- 
ation" he is trying to do indirectly 
through the lodge and other "devices." 
And here we arrive at the ultimate aim 
of the secret lodge system — to make men 
worshipers of self, worshipers of Satan. 
Hear! Hear! Note the lodge ritual of 
"worship." "The name which is above 
every name" is not there. Why? Ask 
Freemasonry et al. Well may many a 
Christian lodge man, awakening to the 
cunning deception, cry, "They have taken 
away my Lord, and I know not what 
they have done with Him !" 

Freemasonry et al. must be placed in 
the catalogue of false religions — Pagan- 
ism, heathen cults, Judaism, Unitarian- 
ism, New Thought, New Theology, New 
Religion (Eliot), Christian Science and 
the rest. These are religions without 
Christ, without the cross, without the 
Blood Atonement, and hence without sal- 
vation. Satan cares not which of these 
religions we take. Satan will indorse 
every creed on earth but one. Satan will 
lay the cornerstone of every temple on 
earth but one. Satan — "God and His 
Son except, naught values he." His Son ! 
His Son ! The secret lodge system is one 
of "Satan's devices" cunningly devised 
"so as to lead astray, if possible, even the 
elect." Oh, for a mighty Pentecost to 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



81 



deliver the church from this subtle and 
fascinating and powerful snare of the 
devil ! 

—Oklahoma City, Okla. 



ATTITUDE OF THE COVENANTER 
CHURCH TOWARD SECRET LA- 
BOR ORGANIZATIONS. 

BY JAMES G. LOVE. 

Criticism against secret oath-bound 
societies is largely directed against the 
-more prominent lodges, while labor un- 
ions are defended from a standpoint of 
oppression and the necessity of securing 
means of livelihood by wage earners. 
And the Church is deceived in the argu- 
ments that the working man is continu- 
ally the subject of oppression, both in 
and out of organized lodges, and that 
"his only resource to relieve a bad situa- 
tion is first the lodge and second the 
strike; and that no other relation will 
-ameliorate his condition. 

In the report of the Committee of 
Synod on Secret Societies, 191 1, page 
129, it is affirmed that "the purpose of 
the lodge is different from the church 
in that its favors are first shown a 
brother in the lodge rather than the. 
church" ; also, that "the mission of the 
•church is to crush out the very spirit of 
.selfishness"; that "true brotherhood is 
exemplified alone in the church as taught 
"by Jesus Christ." This is unquestionably 
true, and is treated to the fullest extent 
in the teaching of Jesus, who understood 
the great problems of brotherhood and 
organized life. 

In a recent article published in the 
daily press-, by a writer who comments 
only on the dynamite side of the lodge 
question, the writer affirms a truth well 
in keeping when he says "Some of the 
oaths provide that 'Union rules' shall 
'precede church, state, and family." This 
comment, by an outsider, is of no small 
significance, as he is wise enough to 
know the intention of the lodge is to 
displace the divinely organized life of 
society in its threefold units, church, 
state, family, by an oath-bound, or- 
ganized life, satisfactory to men, without 
any divine sanction. In defining union- 
ism further he says : ""It is the greatest 



tyrannical, most dangerous trust, this 
world has ever seen," dangerous because 
its closed doors and inner plans are kept 
from the average citizen and its delibera- 
tions are committed, not to good men, 
but to any and all who will take the oath. 
Hence the Los Angeles dynamite murder 
of twenty-one men. In their organiza- 
tion, as a huge trust, it is their purpose 
to include in this secret order every 
working man, Christian or non-Chris- 
tian, clerk, farm hand, United States 
government employees, and all. This has 
partly been accomplished ; and compared 
with the organized life of the church, is 
riot, bloodshed, lockout, strike, extor- 
tion, both from employer and in dues 
from its members. It robs the church 
in initiation fees, dues, assessments and 
fines, deceiving its members by sick bene- 
fits and insurance, which are paid dollar 
for dollar. Already the government has 
begun a rigid examination of this huge 
trust of lodge organized labor ; and has 
returned several indictments. It is the 
avowed purpose of this labor octopus to 
control our government in politics and 
one of its chief objects is to control the 
votes of its members. Thus it would be 
impossible to maintain a Christian or 
moral form of government composed of 
labor, organized in a secret conclave, 
since it contains the element of the 
striker, the dynamiter, and the ignorant 
who have no moral responsibility. This 
writer also says, "Working men in the 
Orders are being heavily assessed to pro- 
tect and defend the higher-ups in the 
Order who have instigated or executed 
crimes in strikes, riots and murder." If 
they refuse they are expelled from their 
lodges, branded as scabs, blacklisted and 
boycotted: a principle entirely contrary 
to the Church of Christ. Merchants are 
forced to handle only union label goods, 
to patronize only union labor, and to 
ostracize a man who does not have a 
"Union card." In no country on the 
globe does labor receive as high wages 
as in America, and yet the lodge system 
does not prevail here to the same extent 
as in European countries. But it is gain- 
ing; and who can tell to what extent it 
will lead, when compared with some of 
the desperate results in the Old World. 
Then how important the testimony of 
our Church ! How necessary our allegi- 



82 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Tulv. 1912. 



ance to Jesus Christ as Governor among 
the nations to His revealed will as su- 
preme in civil affairs ! "Thy kingdom 
come. Thy will be done on earth as it is 
in heaven." — The Christian Nation. 



A correspondent writes: *T have read 
several books on lodges and secretism, 
but never realized the importance of the 
subject until I commenced reading the 
Cynosure.'' 



<£ 


in 

J>itmnd §. (&xttne 


<£ 



From the personal reminiscences by Samuel D. Greene of the abduction and mur- 
der of Captain William Morgan were taken some of the facts so vividly brought out in 
Miss Flagg's "Power of the Secret Empire," which ended in the December number of 
the CYNOSURE. The story has created so wide an interest that we propose to give our 
readers in the next few months some of these facts as recorded by Mr. Greene, an eye- 
witness. — Editor. 



CHAPTER VII. 
What Became of Morgan. (Concluded.) 

I am sensible that there are heavy ac- 
cusations to be made against men who 
held these high offices in the Christian 
church. But they were not by any 
means the only ministers, deacons and 
professing Christians who were actually 
concerned in the condemnation and death 
of Morgan. A large number of church 
members actually participated in the pro- 
ceedings leading to his death, or openly 
justified these proceedings. This is one 
of the most appalling facts respecting 
Masonry as an institution — that it should 
have power to warp and pervert men, 
otherwise amiable, kind and good, turn- 
ing them into secret assassins. It was 
the boast of Masonry at that time that 
there were ministers and deacons enough 
ready to do this whole business. 

When the men who had Morgan on 
their hands could not hand him over for 
execution to the Canadians, he was 
brought back to the American side of the 
river and lodged in the magazine of the 
fort. This was on the morning of the 
14th of September. There is reliable 
testimony that Mr. Morgan was there 
on Sunday, the 17th of September. 
There is reliable evidence that on Thurs- 
day, the 2 1st of September, he was not 
there, and has never since been seen 
alive by his friends. Somewhere be- 
tween September 17 and 21, it is gener- 
ally understood, he was taken out in a 
boat into the Niagara River, a stone was 
tied to him, and he was pushed from the 
boat into the river. 



The story of Morgan, from the time 
he was seized at Batavia, September 12, 
to his death, about a week afterward, is 
one of strange and peculiar interest. It 
has all the elements of wild romance. 
We have no means of knowing what 
was the current of his thoughts through 
those eventful days, but it seems pretty 
evident that he did not, at first, appre- 
hend the terrible dangers encircling him. 
He was naturally a man of a generous 
and confiding nature, and at the time of 
his seizure, and .through his journey to 
Canandaigua and trial there, he appar- 
ently believed, to a good extent, the 
words of those about him. Thev pro- 
fessed to be his friends, who were going 
along with him to see that he had a fair 
trial and that justice was done him. 
Even when he was waited upon at even- 
ing, at the jail, he was deceived. He 
thought Lawson, Foster and the rest to 
be his friends. It was not until he went 
out from the walls of the jail and was 
seized to be thrust into the carriage, 
that the scales fell from his eyes and the 
horrible suspicion of what all this busi- 
ness meant burst upon him. 

In the investigations which were after- 
wards set on foot in regard to this 
whole affair, when once the people were 
aroused, an effort was made to trace out 
this strange journey from Canandaigua 
to Niagara, step by step. It was found 
impossible to do this, but such glimpses 
of it were gained through the witnesses, 
willing or unwilling, who came forward 
to testify, that virtually we have the 
whole story. And vet the flashes of 



Julv. 191 



CHRISTIAN" CYXOSURE. 



-. : 



light by which we gain these glimpses 
are brief and lurid. The first sight we 
got of the expedition, after it left Canan- 
daigua, is late at night, at the town of 
Victor, some ten miles or more away 
toward Rochester. A carriage is driven 
into the shed belonging to a tavern, kept 
bv one Dr. Thomas Beach ; but soon, lest 
there should be too much publicity in 
this, or because some information that 
was waited for had been gained, it is 
backed out and driven round into the 
yard of one Enoch Gillis, out of sight of 
the road and about forty rods off from 
the public house. James Gillis. who was 
at the time living in Pennsylvania — -the 
brother of Enoch Gillis — was active in 
the affairs of that night. He took his 
brother's horse and went off on the road 
toward Rochester. He also helped to 
procure another horse for Lawson. Gil- 
lis was seen the next day on horseback 
in the vicinity of Victor, after which he 
disappeared, and when he was wanted 
in the subsequent proceedings of the 
courts he was not to be found. 

It may be remembered that Mr. Ketch- 
uni, who went from Batavia to Canan- 
daigua with Airs. Morgan, told her that 
Mr. Morgan had gone off with a man 
from Pennsylvania, who had taken him 
for debt. A shadowy foundation for 
this story may be found in the fact that 
this Mr. Gillis. then resident in Pennsyl- 
vania, was about, actually participating 
in this abduction. 

The next we see of the party is in the 
vicinity of Rochester, twenty-eight miles 
off from Canandaigna. This is in the 
early morning of Wednesday, September 
13. A little after daylight the expedi- 
tion reaches Hanford's tavern, about 
three miles out from Rochester. But 
before its arrival (as it came out in evi- 
dence ) another carriage belonging- to a 
livery stable in Rochester, owned by a 
Mason of one of the higher orders, was 
sent out to await the arrival of the Ca- 
nandaigua carriage. Somewhere in the 
vicinitv of Hanford's tavern the party 
was changed out of the one carriage 
into the other. 

The next point at which the expedition 
was recognized and traced was at Clark- 
son, some fifteen miles off from Roches- 
ter, toward Niagara. This was about 9 



o'clock in the morning; and what es- 
pecially attracted the attention of ob- 
servers was. that though a hot day, the 
curtains of the carriage were closed 
tightly. The carriage made a short stop 
at Clarkson, in the middle of the street, 
in the front of Baldwin's tavern. The 
driver ran into the tavern a moment and 
then came out and went directly on. 
About two miles beyond Clarkson new 
horses were procured from one Allen. 
The tired horses were taken off and these 
fresh ones put on, but the men in the 
inside did not get out during the trans- 
action and the curtains were all the time 
kept tightly drawn. In the subsequent 
stir of the people, when the men who 
had been concerned in these transactions 
began to be looked up, the drivers from 
Hanford's on to Clarkson and beyond 
disappeared and could not be found. 

About 12 o'clock on Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 13, a closed carriage drove into 
the village of Gaines, passed through 
without stopping, but about a mile west 
of the village made a halt in the road. 
at quite a distance from any house. Here 
a pair of fresh horses, belonging to 
James Mather, was brought up by his 
brother. Elihu Mather, who. after they 
were fastened to the carriage, mounted 
the driver's box and drove the team on. 
some ten or fifteen miles, into the vicin- 
ity of Ridgeway. There was a strange- 
ness about the whole transaction, not 
only in the closed carriage, but in the 
fact that Mr. Mather should drive it. 
as he was a man of property and stand- 
ing and not accustomed to such business. 
On his way back he jokingly said to 
some one. "I think I make a good stage 
driver, do I not?" 

At Ridgeway, a man by the name of 
Jeremiah Brown, one of the chief men 
of the town, lately a member of the leg- 
islature, brought up a pair of horses 
fn>m the field where they were working, 
and after giving them time to feed, they 
were hitched to this same closely cov- 
ered carriage, and as Mr. Mather had 
done, so Mr. Brown mounted the box 
and turned stage driver himself. This 
was along well in the afternoon. Just 
at nightfall the expedition reached 
Wright's tavern, a little north of Lock- 
port. Here a halt was made, the car- 
riage, instead of being driven up to the 



>- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



lulv. 1912. 



door, having been taken into the barn. 
There was considerable delay at Wright's 
tavern. There was quite a company of 
men gathered here. A woman connect- 
ed with the hotel said that supper had 
been ordered for a company of Masons. 
There was to be the installation of a 
Masonic lodge next day at Lewiston. 
some twenty miles away ; but precisely 
what was indicated by the stir about 
Wright's tavern that night is not clear. 
Just a little west of this tavern was 
the turnpike gate, kept bv a man named 
Maxwell. About u o'clock that night 
a mysterious-looking carriage came up 
very quietly, the gate was open, and 
Maxwell was in the house. He heard 
the carriage approach and thought at 
first the intention was to steal through 
without paying fare. The whole scene 
was so peculiar' and unique that we may 
as well ?ive the deposition of Air. Max- 
well : 

-DAVID MAXWELL, being sworn. 
saith. that in the night of the 13th of Sep- 
tember last he was at home attending to 
the keeping of the turnpike gate on the 
Ridge road, so called, about nineteen miles 
distant from Lewiston. About eleven 
o'clock. P. M., he was sitting in the toll- 
house, and heard a carriage pass through 
the gate very slowly; and upon opening 
the door he saw Jeremiah Brown, oi Ridge- 
way, standing directly in front of the door, 
and saw the carriage standing in the road, 
about three rods west of the house. He. 
Brown, had a shilling in his hand, which he 
handed to him. being the exact amount of 
the toll on the carriage. Deponent said. 
'How do you do. Captain Brown?' He 
made no answer, and turned away quickly, 
and went towards the carriage. Deponent 
called to him quite loudly, and said, 'What 
is the matter?" Brown answered. 'Nothing. ' 
Deponent took notice of the carriage, be- 
cause he had never known Brown to have 
anything to do with a coach before, and it 
struck him as a thing out of the usual 
course. He thinks the curtains were closed. 
Brown joined the carriage, but whether he 
got into it, or got on the driver's seat, de- 
ponent cannot say. The carriage drove off 
quickly, when deponent entered the house: 
himself and his wife had a conversation, and 
expressed to each other their wonder as to 
the cause which should take Captain Brown 
west with a coach so late at night: he. 
Brown, is a farmer in good circumstances, 
residing about thirteen miles east of the 
gate, and well known to deponent and wife. 
and passing the gate frequently, and never 
to the knowledge and recollection of de- 
ponent with any other carriage than a com- 
mon two-horse farm wagon. They event- 
ually concluded that he perhaps had gone to 



Lewiston to an installation. The next morn- 
ing, before breakfast, and not far from sun- 
rise, the same carriage, as he thinks, arrived 
at the gate, driven by a person he did not 
then know (Mr. Mather, previously named). 
The middle curtains were then up. and de- 
ponent distinctly saw the said Jeremiah 
Brown sitting on the back seat of the car- 
riage, appearing to be asleep, and leaning 
back: he saw no other person in the car- 
riage. Deponent said to the driver. 'How 
far did you go out? Did you go to Lewis- 
ton?' He hesitated a little, and said. 'No, 
we did not go to Lewiston.' The deponent 
and his wife then observed to each other 
that they had not gone to the installation. 
Deponent took notice that the coach was a 
chocolate color: it appeared to be a hack 
carriage that had been much used." 

The next distinct glimpse that we get 
of this strange and mysterious carriage, 
still traveling on toward Niagara with 
its carefully-guarded load, is at Cam- 
bria, six miles west, at what is called 
Mollineux's tavern. The partv reached 
this place about midnight. September 13. 
Mr. Bruce, the high sheriff of Niagara 
County, came to the tavern first and 
called up the elder Mr. Mollineux, desir- 
ing him to furnish a pair of horses for 
taking on a carriage to Lewiston. The 
request was complied with, and a pair 
of horses furnished that were young and 
spirited. Mr. Mollineux's son. having a 
pride in the horses, and knowing that 
they were mettlesome and free, request- 
ed the privilege of driving them to Lew- 
iston himself. To this Mr. Bruce de- 
cidely objected and said that he had 
a trust}- driver in the person of Mr. 
Jeremiah Brown, the same man who 
had charge of the team when it 
passed through the turnpike gate. 
Young Mollineux knew Mr. Brown. 
While the carriage was at Cam- 
bria and this change of horses was tak- 
ing place, the curtains were kept care- 
fully closed and even-thing indicated 
great secrecy. The unusual circumstance 
of a man calling at the hotel at that late 
hour of the night for a pair of horses, 
the importance which Air. Bruce seemed 
to give to the whole affair, the haste 
with which he desired the expedition to 
set off — all conspired to make a strange 
impression upon every person not in the 
secret. A servant girl belonging to the 
hotel asked Air. Bruce what the matter 
was. He answered. "You cannot know 
at present." 



July. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



85 



Bftl^Mfc 




OLD FORT NIAGARA. 



The distance from Cambria to Lewis- 
ton is thirteen miles. Mr. Brown mount- 
ed his box and started at about mid- 
night, as before stated, and before day- 
light the next morning returned to Mol- 
lineux's tavern, having driven the twen- 
ty-six miles in about five hours. The 
horses came back jaded and worn, and 
young Mollineux was in a state of high 
indignation. Here the horses, which had 
been taken off from the carriage the 
night before, were replaced, and with 
Mr. Brown on the inside, seemingly 
asleep, and with a Mr. Mather on the 
box for driver, the carriage returned 
through the turnpike gate after the man- 
ner already described. 

But we catch also a clear but momen- 
tary view of things at Lewiston, some 
time during the small hours of morning. 
September 14. This same Mr. Bruce, 
high sheriff of Niagara County, who had 
been so helpful at Cambria, called at Mr. 
Samuel Barton's, of Lewiston, one of 
the stage proprietors, and together they 
went to the stage office to find what 
drivers, if any, were in. They found 
only Mr. Fox (Cory don Fox), who was 
asleep in an adjoining room. He was 
desired to get up a carriage immediately 
to take a party to Youngstown, six miles 
distant. Paul Mosher was connected 
with this office, his special business be- 
ing to regulate the arrival and departure 



of the stages. The account given of 
this affair, under oath, is as follows, Mr. 
Mosher making the deposition and in- 
cluding in his statement what Fox had 
told him: 

"Fox also stated that Eli Bruce, sheriff of 
Niagara County (or. as he called him, 
Bruce), came with Mr. Barton, when he was 
called up. That, after getting the car- 
riage ready, Bruce told him (Fox) to drive 
round to a back street. He did so. and 
found a carriage in the street without 
horses. That there was something curious 
about it: he thought there was a man in 
the carriage who was gagged and bound. 
That there were two persons who came out 
of the carriage standing in the street, and 
both, with Bruce, got into the one he was 
driving. Bruce told him to go, or drive, 
on: he was directed to stop at the residence 
of Colonel King. He halted, accordingly, in 
front of the door, or house, at Youngstown. 
Bruce got out and called up King. Bruce 
and King both got into the carriage. That 
he heard a man in the carriage call for wa- 
ter, and Bruce said he should have some: 
he also thought he heard King say, 'Morgan, 
are you here?' That he (Fox") was directed 
to drive on, and when about half way from 
Youngstown to the fort. Bruce told him to 
stop. He did so, and they all got out, and 
he returned to Lewiston." 

Tn all this journey the aim was -to have 
only Masons employed, in whatever 
capacity. But in the haste with which 
things were done at Lewiston Fox was 
called into service, though he was not a 
Mason. He had seen and heard strange 
thinsrs that night, nnsuited to anv save 



86 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1912. 



Masonic ears and eyes. It was felt that 
a blunder had been committed. An ef- 
fort was accordingly made at once to 
bring Fox into a Masonic lodge. Money 
was offered him to pay the initiatory 
fees, and in about three weeks after this 
night's adventures, he was persuaded into 
the lodge at Lewiston. 

There is evidence, too, of a sudden 
commotion after Morgan reached the 
fort. As has been stated, he was im- 
mediately taken over to the Canada side 
and it was expected that Brant, chief of 
the Mohawks, would receive him and 
dispose of him. But he would not per- 
form the disagreeable service, and so 
Morgan was brought back and lodged 
in the magazine of the fort. 

Paul Mostier, of Lewiston, from whose 
deposition we have just quoted, testifies 
also, that in the afternoon of the 14th of 
September 1 Morgan reached the fort in 
the early morning of that day), "Barton 
came to the deponent, and directed him 
to borrow a saddle and bridle and put 
them on a horse as soon as possible, and 
hitch it by another horse standing under 
the shed, pointing that way, and which 
horse appeared as if he had been ridden 
fast : he added, that he had heard from 
the fort, and must send a man down, for 
he feared there would be trouble yet. 
He ( Mosher) did as directed, and the 
two horses were ridden off soon after ; 
the one put there by this deponent, by a 
Mason resident in Lewiston, the other 
by a person not known to this deponent. 
Next morning the deponent asked said 
Barton if there was any trouble at the 
fort ; to which he replied, 'I guess it is 
still enough.' " 

We have one more of these glimpses, 
or "night visions," in the deposition of 
Mr. Josiah Tyron. On the night of the 
14th of September, he attended a ball at 
Lewiston. on the occasion of the installa- 
tion of a lodge— a fact already referred 
to. He had a friend there who wished 
to go to Canada next morning, and for 
this he must be in Youngstown to take 
the boat early in the morning. In order 
to induce his friend to stay and attend 
the ball, he had agreed to take him to 
Youngstown, with a team. Accordingly, 
in the small hours of the morning of 
September 15, they started out from 



Lewiston towards Youngstown. The 
night was clear, and the moon was shin- 
ing brightly, so that it was easy to dis- 
cern surrounding objects, or recognize 
faces. About two miles out from Lewis- 
ton he met five men walking towards 
Lewiston, three of whom he knew well. 
Surprised at seeing this company on the 
road, at such an unusual hour (it was 
then between three and four o'clock in 
the morning), he reined up his horse, 
and said to one of them, whom he knew, 
"What are you here this time of night 
for?" The answer was, "We have had 
a set down (council or consultation) at 
Youngstown." 

The fort was at this time unoccupied, 
except by the keeper and his wife. 
Troops had been stationed there until the 
previous May, when they left. From 
that time until August, it had been under 
the general superintendence and care of 
a Mr. Giddins, who lived near, and who 
kept a house of public entertainment. In 
August he had passed the care of the 
fort over to a Colonel Jewett, and his 
wife, who lived in it. Mr. Giddins, in 
his deposition, thus describes the maga- 
zine where Morgan was confined. 

"This building stands on the southerly 
side of the fort, is built of stone, about 
the height of a common two-story build- 
ing, and measures about fifty by thirty 
feet on the ground ; is arched over ; the 
side and end walls are about four feet 
thick ; the wall over the top is about 
eight feet thick, and is considered bomb- 
proof ; covered with shingle roof. There 
is but one door, around which there is a 
small entry, to which there is a door also. 
There are no windows or apertures in 
the walls, except a small ventilator for 
the admission of air, and one small win- 
dow in each end, about ten feet from the 
ground. They are usually kept closed, 
and locked on the outside with a pad- 
lock." 

This is surely a formidable prison- 
house, and when one enters it as a prison- 
er, he may well give heed to Dante's 
counsel, and "leave all hope behind." 
When it was found that Brant and the 
Canadian Masons would have nothing 
to do with Morgan, he was thrust in 
here. 

The place had been agreed upon and 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



87 



arranged for beforehand ; because there 
was evidently a doubt whether Morgan 
could be disposed of through the Cana- 
dians. But the plan had not gone so far 
as to be definite, in case he could not be 
left on the Canadian side. The place of 
his confinement had been fixed ; but what 
precisely to do with him had not appar- 
ently been determined. Hence, with this 
new turn of affairs, a council had to be 
called, as has been already intimated. 
(To be continued.) 



©ttoriaL 



We begin the publication in this num- 
ber of a stenographic report of the ad- 
dresses and remarks made at our recent 
Annual Meeting. The addresses have 
not had the benefit of a revision by the 
speakers, and hence, there may be some 
inaccuracies, but we trust that there was 
no serious failure on the part of the sten- 
ographer to catch the meaning of the 
speakers. 



A GRATED WINDOW. 

A candidate for initiation turning from 
the wide world in which he has hitherto 
been free, enters the lodge which he has 
imagined to be a palace but finds to be 
a dungeon. Henceforth he looks back 
at his former domain of freedom, 
through a grated window barred with 
iron obligations. Having spoken and 
acted rashly, he finds no place for revoca- 
tion though he seek it carefully and with 
tears. Not more rigidly did the door ex- 
clude him while he was a cowan, than 
it confines him when he is an initiate. 
"Once a Mason always a Mason," though 
disgusted with what Washington named 
"child's play," or with bombastic adula- 
tion of what he despises, he unwillingly 
remains forever related to that which he 
regrets joining. Though not forgetful 
of the principles and customs of civiliza- 
tion, he must yet cherish relics of barbar- 
ism ; too much alive not to suffer, he is 
chained to the corpse of an effete past ; 



a Christian, he nevertheless participates 
in worship that carefully ignore- Him 
without Whom the word Christianity 
would have had no meaning. Memory 
of lost freedom sharpens the sense of en- 
slavement. Or, if he is a natural slave 
to whom freedom was never dear enough 
to keep, he suffers less, yet sinks more 
hopelessly into that darkne-s which he 
calls light, and into that cramped con- 
finement of feeling, and life, and reason, 
which he delights in calling broad. 

The shadow of the grating crosses 
every page the prisoner looks upon, turn- 
ing clarity into obscurity, and simplicity 
itself into amazing confusion. Limited 
morals combined with their unlimited op- 
posite, look to his bewildered eye like a 
beautiful system of morality. Men once 
ready to declare that though all men de- 
nied Christ yet they would not deny Him, 
do in Rome as Romans do, or in the 
lodge as lodge chaplains do, and virtually 
say I know not the Alan. Yet they 
neither go out nor weep bitterly, but con- 
tinue to join the laughter which is like 
the crackling of thorns. 

Yet here, as often elsewhere, content is 
of all things most dreadful ; like an ano- 
dyne it soothes, but anodynes are poisons. 
Stronger and worse than steel, is that 
which makes a shackle as easy to wear as 
a signet ring. As cold is least dangerous 
when most unbearable, so are false mor- 
als and false religion least harmful while 
most intolerable ; but when a soul 
cramped within a grated dungeon dreams 
of the power of a good enough religion 
which is another gospel yet not another, 
the shadow of the grating bar marks 
the danger line. There is only one good 
side of dungeon bars, and that one is the 
outside. Any man who is enjoying the 
outside view as a free man. is foolish to 
desire to share the prisoner's inside view 
of dungeon gratings. Blessed are the 
bars that shut him out, but thrice ac- 
cursed will they become if he foolishly 
permits them to shut him in. 



May God give us grace and faith and 
courage and ambition always to be ready 
to pass on and up to higher kind- i^' life, 
to new kingdoms of heaven as he shall 
open them to us forever. — Phillips 
Brooks. 



88 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1912. 



Elliot Whipple, Ph. D., was for many 
years a devoted officer of the National 
Christian Association. He gave of his 
means as well as time and thought to 
the interests of the Association. The 
announcement of his death reached us 
after the forms for this month's num- 
ber had been closed, but we felt room 
ought to be made for a few words con- 
cerning his life. It was only the Satur- 
day before his translation that we re- 
ceived a card from him, from his Cali- 
fornia home, saying: "We hope our 
friends 'will call on us' freely when they 
are in San Diego." 

Professor Whipple belonged in a class 
of royal souls of whom there are very 
few in any age. He greatly admired 
Jonathan Blanchard, one of the found- 
ers of the National Christian Associa- 
tion, and first editor of the Cynosure, 
and was like him in his unswerving 
fidelity to the principles of the Associa- 
tion through all the years to the very 
end of his life. We hope to place before 
our readers, in a subsequent number, 
from the pen of President C. A. Blanch- 
ard, a more fitting notice of the noble 
life of this great teacher and loyal sol- 
dier of Jesus Christ. 



THE OATH AT MIZPAH. 

The Book of Judges concludes by say- 
ing: "In those days there was no king 
in Israel ; every man did that which was 
right in his own eyes." Yet there were 
judges who delivered the people from 
their oppressors — Gideon, Jephthah and 
others. Phinehas, also, was priest at 
Bethel, where the Ark of the Covenant 
of God abode, and the people could in- 
quire of the Lord there. It was in these 
times, when, without a king, the people 
followed their own will, that all the war- 
riors assembled at Mizpah, summoned to 
consider the unprecedented outrage 
which had been perpetrated at Gibeah. 
With a great oath they devoted to death 
any one who had not come. In Mizpah 
thev also swore another oath, saying: 
"There shall not any of us give his 
daughter unto Beniamin to wife." These 
were the oaths of a people without a 
king. 

After the cities of Benjamin were de- 
stroved by sword and fire, six hundred 
refugee soldiers alone remained. "And 



the people came to Bethel, and sat there 
til even before God and lifted up their 
Voices, and wept sore. And they said: 
'O Jehovah, the God of Israel, why is 
this come to pass in Israel, that there 
should be to-day one tribe lacking in 
Israel ?' " 

Entangled in their oaths, they first 
slew the people of Jabesh-Gilead, saving 
only the four hundred girls they found. 
These they made captives for the six 
hundred survivors of devastated Benja- 
min. This fulfilled the oath to kill any 
who failed to assemble at Mizpah in the 
beginning. The other oath was embar- 
rassing them still : to provide two hun- 
dred more wives for the sons of Benja- 
min, they planned an evasion of the 
terms of the oath, leaving the two hun- 
dred to capture wives from the daugh- 
ters of Shiloh. Wives stolen were not 
given. 

The commentary of Keil and Delitzsch 
ends as follows : "But, even if there 
were peculiar circumstances in the case 
before us, which have been passed over 
by our author, who restricts himself sim- 
ply to points bearing upon the main pur- 
pose of the history, but which rendered 
it necessary that the ban should be in- 
flicted upon all the inhabitants of Jabesh, 
it was at any rate, an arbitrary exemption 
to spare all the marriageable virgins, and 
one which could not be justified by the 
object contemplated, however laudable 
that object might be. 

"This also applies to the oath taken 
by the people, that they would not give 
any of their daughters as wives to the 
Benjaminites, as well as to the advice 
given by the elders to the remaining two 
hundred, to carry off virgins from the 
festival at Shiloh. However just and 
laudable the moral indignation may have 
been, which was expressed in that oath 
by the nation generally at the scandalous 
crime of the Gibeites, a crime unpar- 
alleled in Israel, and at the favor shown 
to the culprits by the tribe of Benjamin, 
the oath itself was an act of rashness, in 
which there was not only an utter denial 
of brotherly love, but the bounds of jus- 
tice were broken through. 

"When the elders of the nation came 
to a better state of mind, they ought to 
have acknowledged their rashness openly, 
and freed themselves and the nation 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



89 



from an oath that had been taken in such 
sinful haste. 'Wherefore they would 
have acted far more uprightly if they 
had seriously confessed their fault, and 
asked forgiveness of God, and given per- 
mission to the Benjaminites to marry 
freely. In this way there would have been 
no necessity to cut off the inhabitants of 
Jabesh from their midst by cruelty of an- 
other kind.' — Budcuus. But, if they felt 
themselves bound in their conscience to 
keep the oath inviolably, they ought to 
have commended the matter to the Lord 
in prayer, and left it to His decision; 
whereas, by the advice given to the Ben- 
jaminites, they had indeed kept the oath 
in the letter, but had treated it in deed 
and in truth as having no validity what- 
ever." 



TALKING IN SLEEP. 

The initiate repeats his pledge blind- 
fold, with eyes as unseeing as in sleep ; 
he repeats his obligations piecemeal after 
the master of the lodge ; his mind has lit- 
tle opportunity to grasp or examine what 
he is saying ; and thus he is like one who 
talks in his sleep. Yet. when he awakes 
he rinds himself held responsible for ut- 
tering lifelong obligations. He has been 
like a drunkard who drinks knowing that 
he will be held to account for actions 
perpetrated while out of his own natural 
control. This vicious method of assum- 
ing obligations is the initial immorality 
of secret orders ; all other vices follow in 
natural succession. Benjamin F. True- 
blood, LL., D., has said, with great jus- 
tice and wisdom : 

"The first step in every oath or pledge 
bound secret society, from the simplest 
and best of them up to the darkest and 
most abominable, is morally wrong. Xo 
man can bind himself by oath or pledge 
to keep secret what he does not know, 
without thereby bartering away his 
moral freedom. This is the fundamental 
error in all the secret orders which viti- 
ates everything in connection with them. 
It is prima facie evidence of their evil 
origin and character. Tt is a violation of 
one of the primal moral laws of a man's 
being, to take upon himself an obligation 
to keen secret what is yet unknown to 
him. To do so is to enter ignorantly and 
blindly on the future, with one's action 
pledged in advance, with one's will tied 



to a fixed course of conduct, whatever 
the conscience may dictate as the sepa- 
rate occasions for moral judgment arise. 

"This is to blot out in advance, so far 
as it pertains to the doings of the order, 
the moral law of God written in the 
heart. What the individual has thus 
pledged himself to keep secret, may 
prove, when he comes to it. to be a legiti- 
mate object of secrecy; but he did not 
know this when he made his oath. 

"If, on the contrary, the things which 
he learns as he goes forward prove to be 
iniquitous, or for other reasons deserving 
publicity, he finds himself bound in the 
most emphatic way by his own promise 
not to divulge them. He must, therefore, 
either violate the plainest demands of 
his conscience, and abide by his oath of 
secrecy, or obey the present behests of 
duty, make known the things which he 
has learned, and thereby confess the sin 
committed in the beginning." 



"THE MORAL EQUIVALENT OF 
WAR." 

The leading editorial comment of the 
Homiletic Review for September, 191 1, 
fights thus vigorously against fighting: 

"Prof. William James uses this phrase. 'The 
moral equivalent of war.' in a recent article 
in McClure's, in which the premise is assumed 
that the military instinct or habit is more or 
less natural, but may be developed and pro- 
duced along the track of moral activities that 
do not involve the destructiveness of war. 

''Prof. James can justify this title only by 
granting to war certain virtues, and then seek- 
ing to find in peace moral excellences which 
are equal in value and so may prove a true 
substitute. We believe this to be a false start. 
We prefer to begin with Gen. Sherman, 'War 
is hell.' Hell has no moral equivalent. Light 
has no equivalent in darkness; a lie has no 
equivalent in truth. 

"We are unwilling to make any of the con- 
cessions to war which Prof. James make-. We 
do not believe that 'martial virtues are a per- 
manent human good.' If they are. then cer- 
tainly we should make adequate provision for 
training all the people in 'martial virtues.' 
The simple truth is that war is an accident in 
our national life. We as a people have known 
two wars worthy of the name. Roth were 
forced uoon us. Roth are deplored as dire 
evils. They occurred so far apart that ven- 
erations died without the "permanent good" of 
'martial virtues.' To-day we have a little army, 
too insignificant in numbers to be mentioned 
aeainst the eighty or ninety millions of people. 
That little army is composed chiefly of boys. 
This is an absurdly trivial effort toward 'per- 
manent human good' through 'martial virtues.' 

"So far from seeking to inculcate and con- 
firm martial virtues, is not the great effort oi 



90 



CHRISTIAN CYXOSURE. 



July. 1912. 



civilization to subdue that primal lighter in 
man? The man who uses his fists, who carries 
arms, is by common consent a bad citizen. He 
is. among men. what the dog is which retains 
the wolf strain. We kill the dog too free 
with wolfish fangs. We shut up or execute 
the man too free with his primitive temper. 
Civilization means but one thing — out of that 
first condition of self-assertion and animal 
pugnacity to a state of self-centered and har- 
monious relation with fellow men. 

"So far. therefore, from making any con- 
cessions to war. we should always and every- 
where give it its true name, 'hell.' Everything 
pertaining to it. however remotely, should be 
minimized, disparaged, condemned. The home, 
the school, the church, those great permanent 
institutions of civilized society, should be sol- 
idly arrayed against it. From the teaching of 
the nursery to the highest sanctions of reli- 
gion, a consistent and stern imperative should 
unfailingly issue against this greatest curse of 
the race. 

"The work of the world is a steady drill 
in manliness. If any one insists on killing 
men as a means of grace, let him consider that 
the conduct of our railway business is an an- 
nual Bull Run. And the industrial killing 
and wounding in our national work, is greater 
than a war of the Rebellion on the Atlantic 
Coast and a Russo-Japanese war on the Pacific 
Coast in progress all the time." 

The case is here so strongly stated as 
to thrust out into bright light the annual 
taking possession of schools and churches 
by a secret order which founds its 
claim to such privileges on its relation to 
war. It is the school instruction of this 
lodge that patriotism is almost a syn- 
onym for enlistment. War becomes the 
enforced theme of the pulpit, while its 
insignia decorate the house dedicated to 
the name of the Prince of Peace. Per- 
petuated under color of a war that ended 
a generation ago. this present day secret 
society forever inculcates war as the 
main manifestation of patriotism, sets 
aside the teacher from his desk, and 
makes a servant of the preacher in the 
pulpit, in order to glorify itself and mag- 
nify the name of war. 

It is indeed well to honor the living 
and the dead who have risked or sacri- 
ficed life for the nation, but this should 
seem a nation's service rather than that 
of a lodge. Patriotism as shown by the 
veterans should not be ignored every- 
where, -ave where it once appeared dur- 
ing the brief term of remote enlistment. 
and now appears within the doubtful en- 
closure of a secret lodge ; and the idea of 
patriotism should not be limited to its 
manifestation in war. 



GREEK GRAPES. 

"The starting of an untruth with so 
much appearance of the truth as to de- 
ceive many, does not make it the truth. 
It would be amusing, were it not so seri- 
ous, to read or to learn the things that 
some men give out as truth, real sound 
Bible truth, when as a fact, the Bible is 
either ignored or emasculated. With 
great and swelling words of men's wis- 
dom, we are told that there was no virgin 
birth, no miracles, no resurrection of 
Jesus, no immortality except for the 
saved, and. as the terms of salvation are 
so broad, everybody will be saved. Oh, 
yes, all this looks like truth, but get 
under the surface and there is nothing. 
Paul, 'knowing the terrors,' persuaded 
men ; so did Finney and Knapp and 
Spurgeon and Moody : so do Torrey and 
Chapman and Billy Sunday. 

''The old Greek painter who made a 
picture of grapes looking so much like 
real grapes that the birds came and 
picked at them, won a great victory. He 
enjoyed it. so did the other artists ; but 
the poor birds were disappointed. John 
Calvin and Tohn Knox and John Wesley 
and John Clough held up the grapes : 
it may have been with awkward gestures 
and ungloved hands with stains on them. 
but the grapes were real, and thousands 
were fed. Holding up our fathers to 
ridicule may be entertaining and amus- 
ing to some, but that is not preaching 
the gospel." — Alexander Blackburn. 

"Founded on the Bible," "System of 
morality," what a cluster of such grapes 
grows on the poisonous vine that de- 
lights in dark places ! 



Miss Elizabeth Kellogg, the oldest 
daughter of our Recording Secretary. 
Mrs. Xora E. Kellogg, passed to her 
eternal home last month. We extend 
the heartfelt sympathies of the members 
and friends of the National Christian 
Association to the family, and especially 
to Mrs. Kellogg, whose faithful services 
to the association as Recording Secre- 
tary have made her personally known 
to a large number. 



"A friend is a person who knows all 
about you, and likes vou just the same." 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



91 



Wm of ®ur Pori 



ANOTHER ANTISECRECY CHURCH 
DEDICATED. 

A beautiful and debt-free church was 
dedicated on the 19th at Port Madison 
and Puget Sound by Prof. A. Mikkelsen. 
As the church is an orthodox Lutheran 
one, this is a new frontier fort for our 
cause. At the circuit meeting at Everett, 
Washington, of the same Norwegian 
Synod the week before, secret societies 
were mentioned among other dangers 
threatening spiritual life and the church. 
"Yeomen" are now getting strong on the 
coast, as they claim to have done away 
with the objectionable features of Ma- 
sonry and other lodges. That shows how 
even worldly people admit, that some- 
thing is wrong with Masonry and other 
lodges. E. B. B. 



A TWO-MONTHS' CAMPAIGN. 

Lancaster, Pa., June 12, 1912. 
Dear Cynosure : 

Owing to the publication of my annual 
report in last month's Cynosure, I must 
crowd my report for the past two months 
into this letter. 

Since April 13th I have traveled far 
and lectured often. I have filled appoint- 
ments in the Hooper Street Free Metho- 
dist church, and addressed a large con- 
ference of General Council Lutheran 
pastors and delegates in Pastor Was- 
mund's church, Prospect Avenue, Brook- 
lyn, and also gave a lecture in the Trin- 
ity Lutheran church in the Bronx, New 
York. 

I preached in the First United Presby- 
terian church, Boston, took part in a serv- 
ice in the First Covenanter church and 
attended a meeting of the Presbyterian 
pastors of Boston and vicinity. 
- I spoke to some two hundred students 
and others in the Christian Missionary 
Alliance College, Nyack, New York, and 
after a brief rest at home, I went to Ohio 
and delivered three addresses in the 
Friends' Meeting Houses near Mount 
Gilead, and followed that with a Chalk 
Talk to a good audience. I filled the ap- 
pointment kindly made by Pastor Lauffer 
in the Ohio Synod Lutheran church. 
Cardington, Ohio ; the following even- 



ing the Alum Creek Friends' Church peo- 
ple gave me a good hearing. 

While enroute west I made stops at 
Cedarville, Xenia and Dayton, Ohio ; 
Richmond, Berne and Fort Wayne, In- 
diana. The sermon which Brother 
Sprunger gave in the large New Church 
at Berne, Indiana, was cut short by him 
to enable me to address the congregation 
worshipping there. Pastor Kattmann of 
the German Reformed Church gave me 
a part of the Sabbath School hour in 
which to give a message to his scholars. 
The students of the Bible Training 
School of Fort Wayne were called to- 
gether that I might address them. 

It was my privilege after reaching Chi- 
cago to give thirteen addresses in the 
twelve days leading toward and includ- 
ing our Annual Meeting. These were 
given in Christian Reformed, Mennon- 
ite, Reformed, Free Methodist, Swedish 
Lutheran, and United Presbyterian 
churches. 

During the week past I have visited 
the General Conference of the Church of 
the Brethren at York, Pennsylvania. I 
have also spoken to two thousand or 
more of our Mennonite friends in this 
section of the country. 

During the past two months I have 
taken over one hundred and fifty sub- 
scriptions to the Cynosure and distribut- 
ed some tracts. The fields in which I 
have labored look encouraging. If the 
enemy comes in as a flood, surely God 
"lifts up the standard against him." 

Yesterday was a delightful day. and 
one to be remembered by those gathered 
in the Mennonite Sunday School Confer- 
ence at Millersville, Pennsylvania. Many 
important topics relating to child life, 
and the study of God's Word were pre- 
sented by able speakers. Though not on 
the program, by special arrangement, the 
writer was given a hearing before the 
seven or eight hundred people, who 
crowded the large church. 

There were three opportunities to give 
messages relating to the lodge in Men- 
nonite churches in and near New Hol- 
land, Pa., last Sabbath. Kind friends 
with automobiles assisted me in gather- 
ing the Cynosure subscriptions. I re- 
gret exceedingly that I may not mention 
the many who have so kindly helped be- 
cause of the work T have the honor to 






CHRISTIAN" CYNOSURE. 



Tulv. 1912. 



represent. God keeps the record. The 
rewards will come in due time. 

It was a special privilege to address 
so large a body of ministers and dele- 
gates as I found in attendance at the 
Conference of the Xew York Minister- 
ium of the General Council Lutherans. 
While some lodge men are found in the 
membership of this church, yet strong- 
resolutions condemning the lodge have 
been passed. All the pastors. I think. 
regret that there are. lodges and lodge 
members. Some bear faithful testimony. 
Let us hope the address given, together 
with the Cynosure subscriptions se- 
cured, may aid them in seeing and main- 
taining an aggressive effort. 

The committee of the Friends I Qua- 
ker i churches that aided in holding the 
Ohio meetings are to be thanked. I 
found many young people who I spirit 
filled ) are looking upon the lodge 
iniquity with alarm ; who are feeling the 
need of more light, and are seeking to 
give out what they have. God bless 
them all ! I have written much regard- 
ing the splendid people I find at Berne. 
Indiana. A humble, God-fearing people. 
who worship God in Christ, and bear 
faithful testimonv against the Christ-ex- 
cluding lodges. They have just erected 
the largest and best equipped church 
owned by their body. It was a delight 
to be in their meeting, and speak to such 
a large, appreciative audience. 

We surely have reason to praise God 
for the success of our Annual Meeting. 
The addresses were of high order and 
the discussions animated. The attend- 
ance was an improvement on some of the 
annual meetings, but still not what it 
should be. and we trust will be ! 

I am finding this a delightful, fruit- 
ful field. Xext week. God willing. I 
open a campaign of work with our Wes- 
leyan Methodist friends near Forksville, 
Sullivan Co.. Pa. Oh. that God may 
help us all to let the light He gives shine 
out upon the darkness of this world. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



"MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Humboldt. Tenn., June 6, 19 12. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips. Chicago. 111. 
Dear Brother: I have been at Bells 



Tenn.. for about five weeks holding 
meetings. I found two churches there, 
a Baptist and a Methodist, and neither 
one of them had a pastor. A preacher 
runs in there from time to time and 
sets up some kind of a lodge. The peo- 
ple almost never meet for service unless 
it is to hear a sermon about some secret 
order. The Baptists sent for a minister 
to preach for them a few Sundays ago 
and he spoke against secret orders, and 
they came out of the church buzzing 
like bees and saying. "We don't want 
him for a pastor. We would not let 
him minister to us if it would save his 
life."' 

I visited the public school and lectured 
to the children and young people, and 
that lecture stirred the teacher and she 
talked to the mothers about it and had 
them meet me on the next Fridav. I 
talked to those mothers and got them to 
see what the secret orders were doing to 
destroy their children. Thev said. '"Yes. 
it seems we have lost out. for all of our 
children in this place are sinners." and 
it was true. I don't think I ever saw so 
many young people in one place and all 
of them unsaved. I was so grieved 
over these young people that I could not 
keep from crying. 

The church has a lodge hall up over- 
head, and there all kinds of lodges meet : 
no prayer meeting, no one to speak for 
Jesus, no one to lead the children to 
God. They take them into the lodges 
from childhood on up to manhood and 
womanhood — I mean to say. all adults 
who are able to work. You know. Bro- 
ther Phillips, if a man is not healthy 
he cannot get into the lodge on earth, 
nor into the "'Grand Lodge" above. 

My husband preached to the people on 
Sunday. We had a crowded house, and 
I lectured to them against secret so- 
cieties. I told all their secrets. One 
old man came to me after the service 
and said, "Sister Roberson. I like your 
teaching, but I don't like to have you 
talk about our lodges. You are in danger 
when you talk about the masonic 
lodge for I am a Mason myself 
and I know they will kill anyone 
who exposes them." I said to him. 
"You are a good old Methodist preach- 
er. Do you belong to an organization 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



93 



that kills men and women for preaching 
against the sin of idolatry?" He said, 
"You may talk against sin, but let our 
lodges alone, for they are all founded 
on the Bible." I said to him, "You are a 
preacher of idolatry. Read Amos 
7:10-17." He went away, but soon came 
back to me and said, "Well, sister, you 
have made me see more into the secret 
work of the lodges than I ever saw be- 
fore. You have so far convinced me 
that I am willing to give them up." I 
said, "Thank God!" I said to him, "I 
may be killed some day, for the Masons 
killed Mr. Morgan, and you all, right here 
in Jackson, killed a man ten years ago." 
He said, "Yes, I heard of that, but I 
did not have anything to do with it." I 
said, "No, but you belong to the Masons 
and were sworn to keep all their se- 
crets." He said, "Yes, we have to help 
murderers and thieves and anyone else 
out of trouble because of our oaths. 
Sister Roberson, I used to have power 
with God, but somehow I have lost it, 
and I did not know that it was through 
the lodges, but I see now that every- 
where in this country where lodges are 
in the lead, the churches are dead." The 
old man had tears in his eyes. He had 
been a powerful preacher in days gone 
b>y, but he has been caught in the web of 
the lodge. Isaiah 59 15. 

I give out tracts to all I meet, and read 
my ritual to all lodgemen. I met one 
old man who said, "You have forgotten 
what we did to Elder Countie in Mem- 
phis when he tried to expose us." I said, 
"No, I remember all about it, and that 
is the reason why I am showing you the 
sin that is in the secret societies." 
"Well," he said, "that old N. C. A. has 
got us beat. If you were not a woman, 
you would be killed. But we can make 
you give up that book by the laws of 
Tennessee/' I said, "All right, if the law 
takes hold of me for handling this book 
I shall know that there is something 
wrong with the law." He stopped talking 
and walked away from us. I looked for 
them to have me arrested, but no one 
ever came for me. Thank God for Je- 
sus ! Will you all pray for me, that I 
may continue to fight sin to the end? 

Yours for Christ's service, 

Lizzie Roberson. 



A YEAR'S BACKWARD GLANCE. 

Parral, W. Va., May 18, 1912. 
Dear Brother Phillips : I must hasten 
to respond to your request for a letter 
to be read to the N. C. A. Annual Con- 
vention. 

I am still true to my antisecret princi- 
ples. You know better than I do, how 
many tracts, books and Cynosures I 
have distributed during the past year. 
I have never preached anywhere, or held 
a meeting, where I did not raise my voice 
against the Secret Empire, and I have 
distributed tracts at every place also. In 
every place I have met a few who re- 
sponded heartily to my work> but find 
opposition also. 

Some places the lodge element would 
make it up among themselves not to pay 
me anything, and would try to discour- 
age others from doing so. One Mason 
said that he had five dollars for me, but 
when I told him why I opposed lodges, 
it shrank to fifty cents. I suppose he 
gave that simply for the sake of appear- 
ance, as he was a candidate for sheriff. 

In every place to which I go, I meet 
men who have seceded from every sort 
of lodge for conscience' sake. They, as 
well as some who are members at the 
present time, seem anxious for light on 
lodgery. If W. B. Stoddard will make a 
tour through this part of the country, I 
will try to get some openings for him. 

There are three churches in this com- 
munity that bear testimony against 
lodgery: the Church of God, the Dun- 
kards, and the Apostolic Faith. They 
never give a thorough discussion, only 
occasional thrusts. So far as I know, I 
am the only minister in the vicinity who 
ever gave a thorough discussion of the 
subject. Some refuse to inform them- 
selves sufncientlv ; others are seeking 
light. 

I am, and always have been, opposed 
to the lodge. If it were not so, I would 
not stand where I do today. Were every 
minister of every antisecret church to 
scatter tracts and books and papers as 1 
have done, the country would soon be 
sowed down in antisecret literature ; but 
some are afraid, and some are too poor 
to invest a cent. I wish we had less 
practice on dress parade in public con- 
ventions where most people are on the 



"4 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1912. 



right side, and more out on the firing line 
where it is needed. 

People here are surprised that any- 
thing can be known of the internal work- 
ings of secret societies. The funniest 
thing happened last Spring when a lodge 
organizer was going to have Ezra A. 
Cook indicted for publishing their se- 
crets, then denied that anybody but a 
member could know them. Let the light 
shine till the darkness is dispersed. 

G. A. Pegram. 



SOUTHERN AGENT'S REPORT. 

Alexandria, Louisiana. 

I praise God, for His mercy endureth 
forever ! I rejoice to say I am on the 
firing line in the thick of the battle, con- 
tending for the faith once delivered unto 
the saints of God, and battling for the 
right. The secret lodge system is the 
greatest foe of the age both to the church 
and to civil government. As long as 
men are bound together in secret con- 
clave by oaths to defend and stand by 
each other, right or wrong, until death, 
just so long will we have bribed jurors, 
corrupt courts and perjured witnesses, 
except in cases where men have re- 
nounced their lodge obligations, and 
stand by the truth. 

I renounced all oath-bound secret so- 
cieties in March, 1886; and thank God I 
have had no fellowship with the unfruit- 
ful works of darkness since. I have suf- 
fered a great deal of abuse, misrepre- 
sentation and persecution, but in the 
midst of it all, God has stood by and 
helped me to stand upon His Word. I 
am undergoing a terrific fire even now 
in this lodge-cursed, rum-ridden city, but 
God be praised, I have this blessed as- 
surance, "Lo, I am with you alway, even 
unto the end of the world." And yet 
again His assurance is, "My grace is suf- 
ficient for thee." 

I am sure that I would be greatly 
benefited if I could but be present at the 
annual meeting, but as I cannot be pres- 
ent in body, I shall content myself by 
praying earnestly for the outpouring of 
the Holy Spirit and a great pentecostal 
shower upon those who may be permitted 
to assemble. I am glad to report to you 
herewith the work in part done among 
my people from January 1st, 191 1, to 
April 1st, 1912, as follows: Anti-secrecy 



lectures, 214; sermons preached, 225; 
private or parlor meetings held. Scrip- 
ture read and the lodge and saloon dis- 
cussed, 635 ; number of subscribers re- 
ceived for the Christian Cynosure, 

-48. 

I am struggling hard to achieve 
a glorious victory over Balaam and his 
false altars here. My church is standing 
very loyally by me in my contention for 
a pure gospel church. The lodge ele- 
ment is resorting to very many unrea- 
sonable things to hinder and impede my 
work, and I earnestly ask you all to offer 
a special prayer in my behalf that God 
may give me a great victory over sin and 
help me to meet the notes on my church. 

I have just reached home from Ala- 
bama. We had a great meeting there 
and many bore witness against the lodge. 
Dr. Wm. Johnson has renounced the 
lodge. Forty-two made profession of 
"Faith." I am praying for a glorious 
outpouring of the Holy Spirit upon the 
annual meeting this week. May God 
bless you ! 

Yours sincerely, 

F. T. Davidson. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Free-will offerings since last report 
have been received for the N. C. A. work 
from: L. Woodruff, $5; Rev. H. P. 
Schmidt, $1 ; Rev. G. A. Pegram, $3 ; 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Graham, $5; Rev. 
C. G. Sterling, $10; Rev. A. Thomson, 
$5 ; E. Brace, $5 ; Rev. J. B. Gallowav, 
$1 ; Pres. C. A. Blanchard, $14; Rev. 6. 
S. Warner, $1 ; Prof. P. C. Hildreth, 
$25; W. I. Phillips, $15.80; W. S. Orvis, 
$10.50; Rev. D. S. Faris, $1 ; J. C. Berg, 
$5 ; E. P. Webster, $5 ; W. B. Stoddard, 
$10; Rev. W. O. Dinius, $2 ; W. G. Wad- 
dle, 50c ; Mrs. Julia A. Reed, in memory 
of her father, William Barnes, $5 ; A 
Friend, $2 ; A Friend, $1 ; Pres. Silas 
Bond, $1 ; Mrs. Mary Kiteley, $5 ; R. L. 
Park, $10; Mrs. Emma Carstensen, $1 ; 
Mrs. C. A. Johnson, $1.50: L. Woodruff, 
$6; Dr. N. S. do Couto, $7; Mrs. C. Coe 
Shaw, $5; N. S. C, $11; C. C. 
Enestveldt, $1 ; Estate of Samuel 
Berlin, $25 ; Rev. John Barrett, $1 ; 
Rev. E. Y. Woolley, $5; Rev. Dr. 
Jesse Brooks, $5 ; Clara E. Morrill, $5 ; 
G. A. Barnes, $3 ; Thos. P. Kellogg, $1 ; 
Mrs. M. E. McKee, $5; Mrs. R. E. 



July, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



•>' 



Stephenson, $i ; Sam'l Russell, $5 ; R. M. 
Stephenson, $1 ; Miss S. F. Hinman, $1 ; 
Mrs. P. T. Woodward, $1 ; Mrs. Hetta 
Worcester, $2; C. S. Allen, $5; John 
Bradley, $5 ; Mrs. M: L. Couch, $3 ; Mrs. 
C. A. Johnson, $2 and $1 ; George Win- 
die, $25; C. A. Blanchard, $10; Rev. S. 

F. Sprunger, $2 ; Rev. C. D. Trumbull, 
$2; Mrs. N. E. Kellogg, $2; Paul B. 
Phillips, $1 ; Mrs. Anna E. Stoddard, 
$1.50; J. C. Berg, $4; Mrs. M. P. Mor- 
ris, $1.57; J. E. Phillips, $1; E. Brace, 
$5 ; Rev. J. B. Galloway, $1 ; Wm. Doyle, 
$1; A. J. Loudenback, $9; Rev. H/H. 
George, $2 ; Rev. Jas. Stickel, $1 ; Rev. 

G. M. Elliott, $1 ; J. A. Conant, $1 ; Jos. 
Amick, $3 ; Rev. L. G. Almen, $1 ; J. W. 
Zike, 25c; Rev. and Mrs. W. O. Dinius, 
$2.05 ; Rev. J. G. Brooks, $2 ; Rev. I. A. 
Sommer. Ss : Miss Rufina Fry, $1 ; Rev. 
and Mrs. A. G. Johnson, $5;'Mrs. C. E. 
Hillegonds, $5; J. Hoogenboon, 50c; 
James Allen, $5 ; Wheaton College 
Church, $53.46; Church of the Brethren, 
Elgin, 111., $15.77; Christian Reformed 
Churches, Ackley, Iowa, $5 ; Sherman 
Street Church, Grand Rapids, Mich., 
$10.91 ; Hudson Classis, Prospect 
Park, $5: W. Sayvell, $10; Man- 
hattan, Mont., $36.15; Cleveland, 
Ohio, $5 ; Manhattan, per Rev. Van 
der Mey, $3.50; Leighton, Iowa, 
$10; Carnes. Iowa, $8.15; Goshen 
Ind., $2; Oostburg, Wis., $3.27; Pater- 
son, X. J., $10; Englewood, N. J., $14.34. 



ALTOGETHER JUST. 

"Judges and officers shalt thou make 
thee in all thy gates, which Jehovah thy 
God giveth thee, according to thy tribes ; 
and they shall judge the people with 
righteous judgment. Thou shalt not 
wrest justice; thou shalt not respect per- 
sons ; neither shalt thou take a bribe ; for 
a bribe doth blind the eyes of the wise, 
and pervert the words of the righteous. 
That which is altogether just shalt thou 
follow, that thou mayest live, and inherit 
the land which Jehovah thy God giveth 
thee." — Deuteronomy, 16 : 18-20. 

Though specific and detailed so far as 
to incorporate the nature of a statute, 
this law is at the same time the enuncia- 
tion of a principle, and that principle i^ 
a permanent one. Under the Jewish 
seat of justice was laid a moral founda- 
tion stone. Universal morality was here 



specifically applied, and the judge was 
obliged to decree what the accused had 
already been under obligation to do. 

Hence, under the light of this moral 
principle, the case of the jurist and that 
of the litigant are paired together. If 
one is first required to observe the rule 
to love a neighbor as himself, dealing 
kindly, truly and justly, the other is re- 
quired to cause the same neighbor to re- 
ceive treatment that is kind and just and 
true, when it has been withheld ; he is to 
restore the natural operation of a contra- 
vened moral principle. 

Like every other principle of morals, 
this one finds not its first location, but 
its second, beneath a judgment seat- for 
it is in the wide field of conduct, rather 
than in the close walls of a court house, 
that fundamental law is obeyed or bro- 
ken. Applied here, to places where courts 
are made, it still applies everywhere, to 
olaces where court cases are made ; no- 
where can any man, private or official, 
innocently turn his back to what is "alto- 
gether just." 

In order to be free to act his true part, 
the judge must suffer no man to blind 
his eyes or muffle his lips with a bribe ; 
nor could he "respect persons," and so 
deflect the rectitude of his decision. But 
here again, the underlying principle pairs 
the bribers with the bribed ; in this spe- 
cial way. they violate together the moral 
rule, and though the bribe itself be coin, 
it has widest representative connection 
with universal value wherever misap- 
plied to secure unjust influence. 

Again, an accepted promise to give the 
bribe is identical with the whole act of 
briben- ; while a promise of money is no 
more amenable to the condemnation than 
a promise of service or of influence. 
Such a promise, in its very nature, is 
more than one Masonic obligation; it is 
a sworn promissory bribe; it is a pledge 
of influence; it is a vow to respect per- 
sons; it blinds the eyes, it perverts the 
words, it pledges disregard ^\ what is 
altogether just. 



Before God's footstool, to confess. 
A poor soul knelt, and bowed his head : 
"I failed!" he wailed. The Master 
said : 
"Thou didst thy best — that is success!" 
— Henry Coyle. 



96 CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. , ' July, 1912.. 

STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING T ODGES 

FOR SALE BY 

The National Christian Association 
850 West Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



IMPORTANT INFORMATION - HOW TO ORDER 

The safest as well as the cheapest ways to get books are as follows: 

Always remit the full amount for your order by Bank Draft on CHICAGO or NEW YORK, 
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COIN if you can avoid it, and when sent use two envelopes, one inside the other, and REGISTER the letter). 
Please do not send personal checks; if sent, add 10 cents for exchange. 

Write your name ind post-office address PLAINLY and IN FULL, giving street address, post-office 
box number, or number of R. F. D. route and box number. If order is to be sent by express, name your 
express office (if different from post office), and the express company by which to ship. 

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office and express company. 

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CONTENTS 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, Rev. E. B. Stewart; Vice- 
President, Rev. Wm. Dillon; Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. N. E, Kellogg; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Messrs. George W. Bond, President, 
C. A. Blanchard, Rev. G. J. Haan, Rev. 
A. B. Rutt, Rev. E. B. Stewart, Eld. 
Joseph Amick, Rev. Thos. C. McKnight, 
Rev. D. S. Warner, Mr. T. C. Wendell, 
Rev. P. A. Kittilsby, and Rev. M. P. F. 
Doermann. 



The Broken Seal, by Sam'l D. Greene.. 97 

History of the Grange 102 

The Patriot and the Lodge, by Pres. C. 

A. Blanchard 103 

Editorial — 

Traps for Young Birds Ill 

Homogenous 113 

Hazed Schoolboy May Die 113 

Artificial Conscience 114 

Portrait— Prof. Elliot Whipple 115 

Appreciation, by Pres. C. A. Blan- 
chard 115 

Biographical— Elliot Whipple 116 

Obituary Notice— J. S. Baxter.. 117 

News of Our Work — 

Contributions 117 

"Guardians of Liberty" 117 

Form of Bequest 118 

National Convention — The Free Par- 
liament—Addresses by Rev. Alfred 
E. Meyer, Rev. L. V. Harrell, Prof. 
Moses Clemens and Rev. J. J. 

Hiemenga 118 

Stoddard in Ohio 122 

"Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter" 123 

Agent Davidson's Campaign 124 

Advertisement— Webster's Dictionary . . 125 




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VOLUME XLV. 



CHICAGO, AUGUST, 1912. 



NUMBER 4 



*£ 


.famtul §. Greene 


<& 



From. the personal reminiscences by Samuel D. Greene of the abduction and mur- 
der of Captain William Morgan were taken some of the facts so vividly brought out in 
Miss Flagg's "Power of the Secret Empire," which ended in the December number of 
the CYNOSURE. The story has created so wide an interest that we propose to .give our 
readers in the next few months some of these facts as recorded by Mr. Greene, an eye- 
witness. — Editor. 



What Became of Morgan. (Concluded.) 

As has been already stated, it is in 
proof that Morgan was still at the fort, 
locked up in the magazine, on the 17th of 
September (Sunday) ; but before Thurs- 
day, the 21 st, he had disappeared, and 
was never more seen alive. The man- 
ner of his death has already been related. 

We have gone over the events con- 
nected with this memorable journey, in 
this minute way, because it serves to 
show that a very large number of people 
were informed of what was going for- 
ward, and to some extent participated in 
these transactions. Intelligence had been 
conveyed through secret channels ; and 
men rise up and play their parts by day 
and by night, just when and where they 
are wanted. There is a well-compacted 
movement going on over large reaches 
of territory, of which the outside world 
catches occasional gdimpses, but knows 
not their meaning. It is only when the 
subsequent investigation brings nut the 
facts more fully, that these broken frag- 
ments of a plan can be put together and 
made clear to the common mind. 

Here this part of our narrative would 
naturally stop. But by a strange turn 



of providence, it came to pass that more 
than a year after the events just re- 
corded — on the 7th of October, 1827 — 
the body of a man, not far gone with 
decay, was picked up on the shore of 
Lake Ontario, at a place called Oak Or- 
chard Creek. It was found by a com- 
pany of men who were out hunting. A 
jury was called, and after a hasty ex- 
amination, the body was buried. As soon 
however, as the rinding of this bodv be- 
came publicly known, strange stories 
were told about it, and curious attempts 
were made to identify it as the body of 
this person, or that, who had lately dis- 
appeared in all that part of the country. 
The body was taken up again for further 
examination, and soon the reasons be- 
gan to appear for believing that this was 
no other than the body of Captain Wil- 
liam Morgan. 

Men from Batavia and the region 
round about went to see these remains, 
and were satisfied. Mrs. Morgan her- 
self, Mr. Miller, Mr. Harris, and others, 
who had known Mr. Morgan most inti- 
mately in his lifetime, saw and believed. 
A new jury was empaneled, and after a 
more rigid, examination, the conclusion 



98 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



was reached, that these were the remains 
of Morgan, and his body was according- 
ly taken back to Batavia and buried. 

The proofs of his identity could no 
longer be found, of course, in the fleshly 
appearances, but must be looked for in 
the more permanent and abiding parts of 
the frame. And here the coincidences 
were most singular and striking. It was 
little that the height and general struc- 
ture were the same ; these might be 
found in many men ; but there were oth- 
er things not to be overlooked. Mrs. 
Morgan had told beforehand what 
proofs of identity might be looked for. 

Captain Morgan had a habit of whit- 
tling at the nails on his fingers. It was 
his fancy to wear them unusually long, 
and to trim them to a point. In ordi- 
nary conversation, often, when he was 
not aware what he was doing, he was 
thus scraping and cutting his nails. It 
was something altogether unusual for 
one to wear his nails shaped in the pre- 
cise form which Captain Morgan gave 
his. But the body found on the shore of 
Lake Ontario showed this shaping of the 
nails. I myself saw these nails on the 
dead body after it was brought back to 
Batavia, and the sight of them, after his 
death, was to me the most impressive 
proof of his identity. 

Then, again, Mr. Morgan had a singu- 
lar characteristic about his teeth. Even 
his front teeth approached the molar or 
double-toothed formation. So it was in 
this case. Besides, he had lost one of his 
double teeth, and it so happened that this 
very tooth, drawn by a physician in Ba- 
tavia, not Ion?- before, from some pecu- 
liarity pertaining to it, had been pre- 
served. When brought out, it had every 
appearance of fitting the cavity exactly. 

Then, to make the case still more con- 
vincing, he had received a deep wound 
over one of the eyes, and had struck an 
axe into his foot, cutting asunder one of 
his great toes. All these marks were 
found uDon the body. 

The Niagara Fiver had been dragged 
to find the body of Morgan. It was be- 
lieved, at the time, that the body was 
started from its fastenings by this opera- 
tion. and was raised to the surface. One 
of the men emploved supposed that he 
caught si°ht of the bodv, but it sank 
again, and he lost it. The theory was, 



that it had been swept along, by the 
strong current of the Niagara River, into 
Oak Orchard Creek, and had been 
tossed about by winds and waves, until 
it washed ashore at the place where it 
was found. I myself saw the body after 
it was brought back to Batavia, and have 
no doubt whatever that it was the body 
of Morgan. 

Let it be understood, however, that the 
proof of his death by violence does not 
rest upon this identification of the body. 
The fact of his death was established on 
evidence entirely independent of this. 
That was as thoroughly believed among 
the people of Western New York before 
the discovery of the body as afterwards. 
The finding of the body was only a 
strange and unexpected sequel. It serves 
to make an ending for the story but its 
beginning and middle had already passed 
into history, when this denouement came. 

CHAPTER VIII. 
What Morgan Actually Revealed. 

It might seem strange, at first 
thought, that the attempt of Captain 
Morgan to publish the secrets of Ma- 
sonry should have roused such an in- 
tense and wide-spread excitement among 
the Masons ; for this excitement zvas in- 
tense, as has been made abundantly clear 
by the preceding narrative. While this 
process was going on at Batavia in the 
summer of 1826, in all the masonic 
circles of Western New York, and more 
or less throughout the land, there were 
passions aroused that amounted almost 
to a blind frenzy. Men acted as though 
the heavens were about to fall, or the 
earth to be destroyed. Never were 
greater emotions awakened from so 
small and unimportant a cause. 

But there was, nevertheless, a philos- 
ophy under-lying this excitement. It 
must be remembered that Masonry is 
too sacred and important a thing to be 
committed to books. The theory is, that 
it must be transmitted from generation 
to generation through the air — that the 
whole communication of these tremend- 
ous secrets must be purely oral, passing 
from mouth to mouth, as the illustrious 
order lives along the ages. At the very 
outset, in the entered apprentice's oath, 
the candidate, under the most fearful 
penalties, is made to say, "I will not 
write, print, stamp, stain, hew, cut, carve, 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



99 



indent, paint, or- engrave it on anything 
movable or immovable, under the whole 
canopy of heaven, whereby or whereon 
the least letter, figure, character, mark, 
stain, shadow, or resemblance of the 
same may become legible, or intelligible, 
to myself or any other person in the 
known world, whereby the secrets of 
Masonry may be unlawfully obtained 
through my unworthiness." 

If this language is not strong or com- 
prehensive enough, each reader can 
make it so at his leisure. The idea, 
therefore, of actually writing out these 
secrets, would naturally fill the minds of 
those who were foolish enough to be- 
come enthusiastic Masons with a holy 
horror. 

This was not the first time that the se- 
crets of Masonry had been divulged, nor 
was Morgan the only one that has suf- 
fered death for making the attempt. 1 1 
1762 was published, in England, the 
book called "Jachin and Boaz." These 
two ancient words are the names or des- 
ignation of the grips used for the two 
first masonic degrees, the entered ap- 
prentice's, and the fellow-craft's. Soon 
after the publication of Jachin and Boaz, 
its author was found murdered in the 
streets of London, his throat having 
been cut from ear to ear. It was this 
book which Miller undertook to repub- 
lish in Saratoga. After he joined the 
Masons, and took the first degree, as has 
been already related, he made a discov- 
ery. He found that the grip Jachin, 
which used to belong; to the entered ap- 
prentice's degree, had been transferred 
to the second degree of fellow-crafts, 
and that the grip Boaz had been taken 
for the first degree ; so that what used to 
read (in ancient times, before the first 
publication of this book) as "Tachin and 
.Boaz," should now read "Boaz and 
Jachin." Tin's was done so that it might 
be said that Masonry in modern times 
was not what it was before 1762, and 
that no one could tell what it was by 
reading the book "Jachin and Boaz." 
This, however, was only a catch, to de- 
ceive, as, with the exception of the mere- 
lv nominal change just mentioned, all 
things remained just as they were before. 
The entered apprentice degree was the 
same, being, as of old, the first degree. 



But the grip for this degree was Boaz, 
instead of Jachin. 

These words are brought from afar, 
even from the ancient temple of Solo- 
mon. In the First Book of Kings, in 
the long and minute description of the 
magnificent temple reared by Solomon, 
we are told, "And he set up the pillars in 
the porch of the temple ; and he set up 
the right pillar, and called the name 
thereof Jachin ; and he set up the left ■ 
pillar, and called the name thereof 
Boaz." In the Second Book of Chronicles 
we have an account of the same thing, 
though in language somewhat different. 
''And he reared up the pillars before the 
temple, one on the right hand and the 
other on the left, and called the name of 
that on the right hand Jachin, and the 
name of that on the left Boaz." 

Masonry, in its idle and swelling 
claims to antiquity, owns all Solomon's 
temple, and most of what is valuable and 
grand from the creation down. It is an 
old adage, that "one may as well die for 
an old sheep as a lamb." And when Ma- 
son rv undertook to get up a history for 
herself, and to choose her own grand- 
fathers and grandmothers, there was 
nothing to hinder her from appropriating 
to herself what she pleased. The "world 
was all before" her. and it was just as 
easy to have her first organization take 
place in the garden of Eden as any- 
where else. Adam might as well be the 
first Mason as the first man. And so 
down through the ages, wherever any- 
thing great and venerable is to be found, 
let Masonry lay hold of it. for "posses- 
sion is nine points of the law." Accord- 
ingly, we find masonic literature loaded 
down with names, real names (besides 
manv imaginary ones), that never had 
anything more to do with speculative 
Freemasonry than Tulius Caesar had to 
do in digging the Erie Canal. To con- 
nect Solomon and his temple with Ma- 
sonry is like the prattle of little children 
who make pies out of mud. and get up a 
school out of sticks of wood. And yet. 
so constantly are these claims put forth, 
and so grandly are they mouthed over 
from generation to generation, that the 
more simple-minded among- the Masons 
doubtless believe that they belon? to an 
institution which is as old as Solomon, 
at least, if it be not as old as the world. 



100 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August. 1912. 



Jachin and Boaz, therefore, are the two 
first pass-words of Masonry. Through 
this august gateway the novitiate enters 
the wonderful temple. 

There have also been other attempts 
to divulge the secrets of Masonry, be- 
sides this of "Jachin and Boaz." But we 
will not dwell upon these items of old 
history. 

"What Morgan undertook to do was. 
to reveal the seven first degrees. He 
actually wrote out these degrees in full. 
By his knowledge as a masonic lecturer, 
he was able to do this. It was the in- 
tention that these seven degrees should 
be published together. This was the 
book which Colonel Miller promised to 
give to the world. It was in the hope 
and expectation of doing this that the 
book was so long delayed. 

On the other hand, it was the inten- 
tion of the Masons, when they began 
to combine together in the summer of 
1826. to suppress the book altogether — 
to prevent the publication of any part of 
it. Morgan and Miller, knowing the 
dangers to which the book would be 
exposed while it was in course of pub- 
lication, meant always that there should 
be in existence duplicate copies of each 
degree, so that if one were seized and 
destroyed, the ether might survive. The 
commotions among the Masons during 
the summer of 1826 had reference to the 
suppression of the book, as also to the 
punishment of Morgan and Miller for 
having proved faithless to their masonic 
oaths. 

At the time when Morgan was ar- 
rested on Saturday. August 19. and 
locked in jail, and kept there over the 
Sabbath, trie primary object of the move- 
ment, apparently, was to make a raid 
upon Morgan's papers. The plans for 
his abduction were not then ripe. Pa- 
pers were seized at that time, and doubt- 
less the men chiefly concerned thought 
they had accomplished more than they 
had. They did not understand the ar- 
rangement about duplicate copies. They 
did. however, find abundant proof that 
Morgan was engaged in revealing the 
secrets of Masonry. 

But the man who really made the 
break in the process of publication was 
Daniel Johns, the spy, and the story may 
best be told bv Colonel Miller himself. 



We copy from an account afterwards 
furnished by him for the paper called 
"The Morgan Investigator" 

'"To present occurrences in a connect- 
ed order I must go back to a period of 
time anterior to that when an attempt 
was made to burn my printing offices. 
About the middle of August last, by par- 
ticular request of the author. I applied 
to the clerk of the northern district of 
this state, at Utica. for a copyright of a 
work entitled 'Illustrations of Masonry,' 
etc. I had ascertained that every move- 
ment of mine was closely watched. To 
elude pursuit various means were resort- 
ed to. On my return, which was by way 
01 the canal. I left the boat at Fullam's 
Basin, eight miles east of Rochester, The 
boat had passed but a few miles after I 
had left it. when the captain was hailed 
from the banks of the canal, by a well- 
dressed individual, who inquired. 'Has 
not Mr. Miller been on board that boat?' 
and on being answered in the affirmative, 
demanded my baggage, by authority, as 
he alleged, of a written order from me; 
but being unable to designate what my 
baggage was. he was foiled in the at- 
tempt to become possessed of certain 
property that was then supposed to be 
in my charge. 

"On the arrival of the boat at Roches- 
ter, which was between the hours of 
eleven and twelve at night, the strongest 
visible evidence was presented to me 
that the watch-cogs were on the alert ; 
but on assuring themselves that there 
was no bone worthy of contention. I was 
left to the enjoyment of mv own reflec- 
tions. 

"A few days after these occurrences, 
a man of good appearance, about twen- 
ty-eight or thirty years of age. well 
equipped, zvith thousands of money at 
command, was introduced to me at Ba- 
tavia. by the name of Daniel Johns, a 
Canadian, who was anxious to embark, 
through 'weal or woe.* in the crusade 
aeainst Masonry. His story beinof plain, 
plausible, and connected, he was un- 
hesitatingly permitted to become a par- 
ticipator. He aided all he could, ap- 
parently", in the printing and folding of 
masonic books, and became an active. 
and. as was supposed, efficient guard 
against 'cowans and eavesdroppers.' as 
well as more prominent enemies. He slept 



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102 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



his work entitled "Light on Masonry," 
the six degrees, as written out by Mr. 
Morgan, were brought together. In the 
same work will be found almost all the 
higher degrees, many of them, however, 
not written out with the fullness and 
minuteness of those revealed by Mr. 
Morgan. The author, speaking of his 
book, says : "While preparing it for the 
press, I obtained from the highest au- 
thority thirty-three of the sublime and 
ineffable degrees, all of which I know 
to be correct, and I give them to the 
world verbatim et literatum." 

In answer, then, to the query suggest- 
ed in the title to this chapter, it may be 
said that Morgan wrote out fully and 
carefully the seven first degrees of Ma- 
sonry ; that three of these were published 
soon after his death, in the work issued 
by Colonel Miller ; that the three next 
were afterward published in the "Light 
on Masonry/' and that indirectly, and 
growing out of what he did and suffered, 
the secrets of Masonry were soon very 
generally exposed to the public gaze. 
(To be continued.) 



HISTORY OF THE GRANGE. 

EDITORIAL IN "GRANGE FORUM/' MAY 
I5TH, 1912, BEAVERTON, MICH. 

In our work among the Granges of 
a large part of the state for a number 
of years, we are led to the conclusion 
that the Grange is very imperfectly un- 
derstood even by its own members. 

The founders of the Grange were 
prominent Free Masons. Their connec- 
tion with that order gave them valuable 
experiences to be used by them in ar- 
ranging the cohesive forces which was 
to hold in a fraternal bond the agricul- 
tural people of America. 

The terrible War of the Rebellion had 
just ended. The issue between the North 
and the South had been settled, not be- 
cause the South was convinced of its 
error but because of the overpowering 
numerical strength of the North. The 
southern people were not good losers. 
When they looked at their devastated 
homes, fields and cities, and at their 
crippled and almost annihilated condi- 
tion of their once magnificent manhood. 
At what they believed to be the ruin of 
their principal industry there arose a 
hatred against the people of the victori- 



ous North so intense that now after the 
lapse of 47 years there still remains 
traces of this feeling. 

* * * 

The Masonic Order had, since its or- 
ganization centered its attention almost 
exclusively to the problem of creating 
within its membership a highly exalted 
feeling of fraternity. Those teachings 
were not in vain. They were manifested 
throughout that horrible war. The slay- 
ing of a commander might be of greater 
strategical advantage than the annihila- 
tion of a corp, but if known to be a Ma- 
son, sharp-shooters or others were not 
permitted to take personal aim. This 
brotherly feeling was manifested in car- 
ing for the wounded. In the hospital 
and in the prison, and when the fright- 
ful scene was ended at Appomattox, the 
few who could meet and part with the 
grip of the Mason could turn to their 
peaceable avocations with less rancer in 
their hearts at least towards a portion 
of the enemy of four long bloody years. 

But the Masonic Order was expensive, 
for those days, and to a large extent, ex- 
clusive. From its very nature its benefit 
could not be extended to the people 
sought to be reached, at least within any 
reasonable time, for the purpose of al- 
laying the feeling of animosity between 
the two sections. 

Those were prominent considerations 
in developing the idea of organizing the 
farmers of the North and the South into 
one great fraternity. Could any pur- 
pose have been nobler? 

Much of our information is taken 
from a booklet, entitled "Origin and 
Early History of the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry," by J. Wallace Darrow, Chat- 
ham, N. Y., from which we copy many 
paragraphs adding such other informa- 
tion as we are able to obtain. 

* * * 

On October 20, 1865, Isaac Newton, 
then U. S. Commissioner of Agriculture, 
wrote to Mr. Kelley, who was then in 
Itasca, Minn., to come to Washington 
"on special business." He responded 
and on Jan. 1st. 1866, received his com- 
mission as special agent of the Agricul- 
tural department "to proceed immediate- 
ly through the states lately in hostility 
against the government," to procure 
statistical and other information bear- 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



103 



-ing upon the agricultural resources of 
the south, and report the same to the 
department for publication. On Janu- 
ary 13, 1866, Mr. Kelley left Washing- 
ton on his "long cherished trip," as he 
stiles it, and while absent on that oc- 
casion, conceived the idea of a secret or- 
ganization of farmers, North and South, 
to renew and promote a more fraternal 
feeling. There was need of it. 
* * * 

Of this period, National Master J. J. 
Woodman said in his annual address in 
1885 concerning Mr. Kelley 's travels: 

"Although the garments dyed in 
blood had passed away, and the coun- 
try was again undivided and indivisable, 
yet in his southern travels blackened 
ruins, abandoned fields and desolate 
homes met the gaze on every hand. The 
South and no small portion of the North, 
was furrowed with graves, and the whole 
land was shrouded with mourning, and 
peopled with crippled, wounded and dy- 
ing soldiers, while in thousands of deso- 
lated homes 'grief was completing the 
carnage of war' and a deep and intense 
bitterness engendered by the events of 
the cruel and unnatural struggle existed 
between the people of the North and 
South. With Mr. Kelley's observing 
habits and active mind, he naturally took 
in the situation, and came to the ^conclu- 
sion 'that politicians would never re- 
store peace in the country, and if it 
came at all, it must come through fra- 
ternity, the people North and South must 
know each other as members of a great 
family, and all sectionalism be abolished.' 
He expresses those sentiments in a let- 
ter written while in the South, and to his 
friend, the Rev. John Trimble, an officer 
in the Treasury Department, on his re- 
turn to Washington and then went to his 
^ farm in Minnesota. 

* * * 

"That a fraternal organization of 
farmers would promote a better feeling 
between the two sections so lately en- 
gaged in fratricidal strife, was an idea 
that bore much fruit in the after years. 
And that an organization having the 
bond of secrecy as one of its chief fea- 
tures would insure a better fraternity of 
feeling and a more cordial unison of 
purpose than an organization non-secret 



in its character, was the wise conclusion 
reached by Mr. Kelley." 



THE PATRIOT AND THE LODGE. 



[Pres. C. A. Blanchard, of Wbeaton Col- 
lege, was invited to give an oration at Wat- 
erloo, Iowa, July 4th, on secret societies. 
In substance he spoke as follows. — Editor.] 

Fellow citizens : I have been invited 
by those who have arranged the celebra- 
tion of this day to discuss before you 
the relation which a patriotic people 
should sustain to the secret society sys- 
tem of our day. Having for forty years 
studied with care and with such ability 
as I possess the secret society system, 
it is inevitable that I should have had 
some thoughts on the subject which is 
before us. 

Divorce. 

There are many important questions 
now claiming the attention of the Amer- 
ican people. Canada has about as many 
inhabitants as the state of Ohio. In 
Canada, during a recent year, there were 
four divorces ; in Ohio, during the same 
time, there were three thousand. Dur- 
ing a term of years Canada had sixty- 
nine families broken up in this manner ; 
during the same years in the United 
States seven hundred thousand were so 
destroyed. 

Catholicism. 

Here is a tremendous problem and one 
which is, I am sorry to say, educationally 
neglected by both church and state. The 
encroachments of the Catholic church on 
American institutions is another great 
question which is far less thoroughly 
studied than it should be. This church 
has had a history of a thousand years. 
In Italy, Spain, Portugal. Austria. 
France and England it did its perfect 
work. The result has been that almost 
every country in Europe where the 
church has ever had a footing, has been 
compelled to legislate against it. The 
religious orders, so called, have been 



104 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



banished from nation after nation where 
the Catholic church was the historic re- 
ligion. We have welcomed these organ- 
izations which the countries which orie- 
inated them have been compelled to cast 
out. All politicians — municipal, state 
and national — have to make terms with 
this church in order to accomplish their 
purposes. 

Intemperance. 
This is practically the only question of 
our day which is receiving anything like 
adequate attention, and this does not 
have the place in the thought, in the life 
and the work of the people that it should. 
Still we are undertaking a part of our 
duty. We realize the political, social 
and personal degradation which the traf- 
fic in strong drink causes ; we understand 
that insanity, diseases, poverty, crimes 
and deaths are very largely responsible 
to this miserable, abominable traffic. And 
yet we know that the great political or- 
ganizations of our country are the hum- 
ble servants of the distillers and brew- 
ers, and, shame to say, the ministers 
and churches very largely support this 
thing by their votes. 

National Murders. 

The traae ot war is another of the 
abominations of our time. Europe is 
spending about one billion, five hundred 
millions of money annually on wars, past 
and present, and preparations for future 
wars. We are now spending about two 
hundred millions more in war prepara- 
tions. We have not an enemy in sight 
or any prospect of an enemy, if we be- 
have ourselves. And yet we are called 
upon by our politicians to spend hun- 
dreds of millions of money for wars, 
arms, munitions, etc., with the full ex- 
pectation that the whole business will 
go to the junk-heap within the next 
twenty years. 

The Traffic in Women. 

I have almost all my life supposed 
that women who gave themselves to 



vicious living did so from vanity, from 
idleness, or because of discouragement. 
I never knew until within a few years 
that innocent girls were being actually 
kidnaped, locked up in rooms, pounded 
into submission to the lusts of brutal 
men and thus prepared for lives of 
shame. Nevertheless, the proof is over- 
whelming, and any young woman or girl 
who steps upon the streets of one of our 
cities is liable to this fate, which is a 
hundred times worse than death. Of 
course, men who carry on this business 
are hand and glove with the liquor 
forces ; they are the same men in multi- 
tudes of instances, but the two trades, 
infinitely horrible as they are, are separ- 
ate, and ought to have attention from 
the American people. 

Sabbath-Breaking. 

Another of the sins and crimes of our 
day is the paganizing of the Sabbath. 
Scientific tests show that a man who 
works seven days in a week lives on the 
average twelve years less than the man 
who works six days a week. In other 
words, the corporations which are work- 
ing men seven days a week in our coun- 
try are shortening their lives on the aver- 
age twelve years per man. A thousand 
men lose twelve thousand years of life 
by Sabbath toiling. Pleasure seeking and 
greed and indifference are the terrible 
trinity which are producing this horrible 
result. But ministers, Sunday school 
workers, workers for the Young Men's 
Christian Associations and hundreds of 
thousands of church members are shar- 
ing in this movement to deprive the 
working man of his only vacation. 
The Craze for Money. 

I do not need to mention this, perhaps, 
and yet everyone knows that today, as 
in the olden time, the love of money is 
the root of all evil ; that all the shames 
and crimes which are suggested by the 
subjects above named have their root 
first or last in the love of money. It 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



105 



seems that as soon as a man has become 
very wealthy he gets tired of his wife. 
The Catholic church, from the beginning 
until now, has trafficked in the sins of 
men for gain. The liquor forces are 
conducted for purposes of profit, and so 
with war, and so with the trade in wom- 
en, and so with the breaking of the Sab- 
bath. All of these find their roots in the 
love of gain. 

The Craze for Fun. 

I mention last another tremendous evil 
of our times — I speak of the desire on 
the part of young people for what they 
call fun. Sports for young people used 
to be inexpensive, helpful and natural ; 
now they are terribly expensive and in- 
jurious to body, soul and spirit, and the 
church seems to have little or nothing to 
say while the sheep are being slaugh- 
tered. 

I have mentioned briefly these tremen- 
dous problems of our times, in order that 
you may not suppose me to be disposed 
to ignore any great interest of humanity, 
but I have been invited to speak with you 
in regard to the secret society system of 
our country ; to ask what a patriot ought 
to do in regard to it, and I am pleased tc 
accept this invitation and ask you to 
think with me for a while in regard to 
this vastly important subject. 

Multa in Uno. 

This is a Latin phrase meaning "Many 
in one." I use it because I wish to im- 
press upon the minds of my hearers and 
readers that all the evils mentioned above 
and others which might be named are 
included in the subject of the hour. Dif- 
ferent sins, vices, and crimes have each 
its own peculiar characteristics, but there 
is one marked fact which is common to 
them all, the instinct of evil is secrecy. 
When men have become thoroughly 
shameless, when reputation as well as 
character has been destroyed, men are 
sometimes open and avowed in their evil 



doings ; but as long as there is even a 
semblance of respectability, a man who 
wishes to do wrong apologizes for it to 
himself, denies it to his neighbor and 
hides it if he can. This is true of the 
thief, the counterfeiter, the drunkard, 
the adulterer, the traitor. So self-evident 
is this that it requires no argument. Even 
children know enough to hide when they 
are doing wrong; even a saloonkeeper, 
unless he is required to do otherwise, 
screens his windows and doors ; gambling 
hells in civilized communities are upstairs 
or downstairs or in the far ends of build- 
ings and the doors are always "duly 
tyled" ; the crimes that lead to divorce 
are committed in secret and the divorces 
themselves are granted by judges in se- 
cret whenever those who secure them are 
able to get them in that way. It seems 
scarcely necessary to spend any time on 
a self-evident proposition like this, that 
all evil naturally hides and that organiza- 
tions constructed on the principle of se- 
crecy are naturally friendly to all things 
which need to be kept secret. The great 
Wendell Phillips said to me many years 
ago : "Secret societies are not needed for 
any good purpose and may be used for 
any bad purpose whatsoever. I think 
that all such organizations ought to be 
prohibited by law." If otir rulers had 
acted upon this simple, obvious principle, 
it is safe to say that a thousand other 
evils which we are now bunglingly trying 
to deal with would never have existed at 
all. 

The Cry for Publicity. 
Oneof the great demands of the last few 
years has been for publicity in regard to 
matters affecting the state. It has been 
said, and truly, that the great corpora- 
tions which have been controlling our 
nation for the benefit of a handful of 
people would never have been able to 
accomplish their evil tasks if the contri- 
butions to campaign funds had been 
made public. From ocean to ocean at 



106 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



this time there is an effort to compel 
candidates and committees to publish 
itemized statements as to the sources 
from which they receive money and the 
purposes to which it is applied. It seems 
to be universally admitted that the politi- 
cal corruption of years past has been in 
large measure caused by the secret meth- 
ods adopted by political managers. I 
think no sane man doubts the truth of 
this general opinion. 

If it is correct, what must we say of a 
great system which binds millions of 
men together under the pledge of secrecy 
and permits them to work in cities, coun- 
ties, states and the nation, each for the 
other, with no possible way in which the 
public could be informed as to what is 
done. It is a commonplace that office- 
seekers belong to secret societies ; not 
generally to one alone, but to many. If 
secret societies are co-operating to put 
their members into places of power in 
order that they may distribute the spoils 
among themselves and protect one an- 
other from the consequence of crimes 
committed, this nation-wide phenomenon 
is clearly and fully explained. Publicity ! 
Yes, this is the need of the hour. With- 
out it, base and ignoble men will com- 
bine to rule the decent people of any 
municipality, state or nation. "Those who 
do evil," our Lord says, "love darkness," 
and it is equally true that those who are 
lovers of darkness do evil. We might 
stop here and rest the whole argument 
against secret societies on the general 
principles involved. 

But this is the patriot's day. In thou- 
sands of cities and villages congrega- 
tions are assembled and speakers are ad- 
dressing them with reference to the past, 
the present and the future of our coun- 
try. It will therefore be wise to examine 
somewhat more in detail the secret so- 



ciety system, that we may judge what 
the patriot's duty respecting it is. 

Religion the Fundamental Thing. 

I make no apology for calling your 
attention to the fact that no nation can 
be permanently better than its religion. 
The sea rovers who used to devastate 
the coasts of Great Britain were as good 
as their gods ; the government in Mexico 
has been for four hundred years as good 
as the religion of Mexico ; the child 
widows of India and the girls who are 
married to "The Stone God" are the 
natural result of the religions and phil- 
osophies which have prevailed in India 
for four thousand years. Those who 
saw the foreign nations which were 
grouped on the Midway in the Colum- 
bian Exposition of '93 found in the faces 
and characters of those frightful people 
the natural result of the religions which 
they have believed and practiced. I men- 
tion this fact to say that if we know 
what the relation of lodgism to Christian- 
ity is, we shall be able to tell what the 
effect of lodges on the nation will be. 

I do not dwell' on this point at length, 
but I wish to set it clearly before you. 
All men who have studied the secret so- 
ciety system of our country know that 
it is religious in character. These lodges 
have a religious creed, a religious ritual ; 
they profess to make men good in this 
world and to make men safe in the world 
to come. Only a few years ago a com- 
mandery of Knights Templars came into 
an evangelistic meeting conducted by 
Rev. William Sunday, and on being re- 
quested to do so stood up and repeated 
their creed and the Lord's prayer. Of 
course, all the parties to that horrible 
transaction knew that Knights Templars 
are often profane and drunken, and that 
they would probably have a great dance 
with its miserable vices attendant in the 
winter, but they listened and applauded 
while this secret society went through 
with its solemn mockery. 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



107 



Religious, But Not Christian. 
Rev. H. W. Stough, one of our leading 
evangelists, said not long ago that he 
had learned by his experience in meetings 
that it was not sin but religion which 
is the chief opponent of Christianity. 
It is this fact which has made every good 
and truly successful evangelist the enemy 
of the lodge system. Finney, Moody, 
Torrey, are examples of a host of godly 
men, everyone of whom has found that 
any pretense of Christian faith on the 
part of adhering members of secret so- 
cieties is almost certain to be a deception 
and fraud. The world has never suffered 
for lack of religions. There are too many 
now, but the world has suffered and still 
suffers for want of Christianity. It is 
one of the sickening things of our time 
to attend religious gatherings and hear 
professed Christian teachers talking 
about "religion" as if there was only one, 
and that anybody who was "religious" 
was saved and safe. It would seem that 
in an age which professes to know so 
much about missions as this one does, we 
would long ago have been cured of such 
a folly as this. India, Africa, China, the 
islands of the sea, all are filled with re- 
ligions, and these religions are consistent 
with the slavery of women, the murder 
of children, the neglect of the aged and 
the slavery of all except a handful of 
rulers. It is said by travelers that every 
house of ill fame in Japan has a little 
shrine, where men about to commit adul- 
teries and fornications worship before 
they practice their vices. Cannibals who 
would cheerfully knock down, boil or 
bake and eat the persons who listen to 
me, all have their religions. Is it not 
time that Christians and Christian minis- 
ters discriminate between Christianity 
and the base and ignoble faiths which 
have conducted to such loathsome and 
unspeakable results ? 



Where is the Lodge Religion to be Classi- 
fied? 
In view of the facts above stated it 

becomes a question of prime importance 
as to the classification of the lodge reli- 
gion. Is it Christian or non-Christian? 
If it is non-Christian, it is pagan; that 
is to say, it is in its essential character 
related to the system which ignores Je- 
sus Christ and the Word of God. If it 
is Christian in creed, ritual and morals, 
so far so good. Of course, then it would 
have no right to be secret, it would have 
no right to exclude women, it would 
have no right to exclude children, or the 
poor or the crippled or the blind. The 
Christian religion is for all these, and if 
the lodge religion is Christian, the gates 
and bars which it has erected to fence 
out all the needy and suffering part of 
humanity should be instantly broken 
down. But when we study these societies 
we find that thev are not even avowedly 
and by pretense Christian. The leaders 
in these lodges tell us plainly that their 
religion is that one in which all men 
agree. They not only exclude Jesus 
Christ from creed, ritual and teachings, 
but thev tell us why they exclude Him. 
Thev say that their religion is universal, 
while Christianity is sectarian, and that 
therefore thev are compelled to exclude 
all mention of the Savior of the world. 
I pause a single moment to name the 
crowning proof of this anti-Christian 
character ; since the beginning of the 
world until now there was never but 
one society which struck the name of 
Jesus Christ out of the Word of Cod : 
religions have ignored the Bible, but 
aside from Freemasonry none have put 
the Bible forward, given quotations from 
it and then stricken out the name of the 
Savior of the world. 

Morals Like Creed. 
Of course, every thoughtful person 

knows without being told that a man's 

faith will ultimately determine his life. 

In other words, his character will not 



108 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



permanently be better than his creed. If 
his creed is pagan his conduct will be 
pagan also, and this we find to be a set- 
tied fact as to the lodges. The Christian 
religion says, "Thou shalt not steal" ; 
the lodge religion says, "Thou shalt not 
steal from a member of the lodge or from 
a lodge." The Christian religion says, 
"Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thy- 
self," and explains that a neighbor is a 
man who is suffering, in need, near 
to us whom we may help ; the 
lodge religion says, "Thou shalt help 
thy brother lodgeman who has paid his 
dues and who is sworn to help thee if 
thou art in need." The Christian religion 
says, "Thou shalt not commit adultery" ; 
the lodge religion says, "Thou shalt not 
commit adultery with certain relatives of 
the members of the lodge." The Christian 
religion says, "Thou shalt not take the 
name of the Lord thy God in vain" ; 
lodge religions 'swear and swear and still 
swear their adherents. I understand that 
many lodges cause their members to af- 
firm rather than to take a formal oath, 
but all jurists agree that a solemn affirm- 
ation is in substance an oath, and this is 
required by all lodge religions. 

It is the universal testimony of mis- 
sionaries that pagan religions do three 
things for their adherents: They make 
them liars, they make them impure, and 
they make them cruel. A pagan 
will, when he is, with or without cause, 
jealous of one of his wives, sew her up 
in a bag and drop her into a river with- 
out any compunctions of conscience. I 
read only the other day from a mission- 
ary in Africa that he heard wailing, long 
continued, in the court next adjoining his 
house. He went to the battlement, 
looked over and saw a woman chained 
to a wall on the side of the court opposite 
to himself. There was a hole in the wall 
like a dog kennel, and when he saw the 
woman she ran into the hole. He spoke 
to her and she came out, and he said to 



her, "Why do you weep and wail?" She 
said: "Some time ago I disobeyed my 
husband; he beat me frightfully; he 
chained me to this wall ; he has beaten 
me every day and he tells me that he 
will beat me to death. This is why I 
weep." Yet the Koran, which is the Bible 
of that man, has no condemnation for 
conduct such as this. Freemasonry, Odd 
Fellowship, and hosts of lodges which 
are sprung from and patterned after 
them, will produce the same results when 
the Bible is gone, the Sabbath is gone and 
the world has become universally lodge 
in its religion. 

Lodge Obligations Like Lodge Religion. 
As the lodge religion is an antagonist 

of the Christian religion, so the theory 
of lodge government is antagonistic to 
free government, the result of the Chris- 
tian religion. All free governments have 
arisen from the teachings of Christ, that 
He is Master and that men are brethren ; 
not brethren because they have paid dues, 
gone through certain ceremonies or taken 
certain obligations, but brethren because 
they are the creation of God, made to 
love, befriend and assist one another. 
There is no way to found and conduct a 
government of this kind except by in- 
telligence and Christian faith. An ig- 
norant and an immoral people must al- 
ways be governed by a despot. This is 
the trouble with South America, with 
Mexico, with Africa, with the far east. 
In any country, if people are to have a 
free government, they must be able to 
control themselves ; there is no other way 
to accomplish this result. 

Now, the lodge system in its construc- 
tion allies itself, not with freedom, but 
with despotism. The rule of the master 
in the lodge is absolute ; the rule of the 
grand lodge over the subordinate lodge 
is absolute ; the whole discipline of the 
lodge system is a discipline for slavery 
and not for freedom. The man begins 
in his lodge life by promising to conceal 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



109 



all he is told, and to obey those who are 
over him ; in oath after oath, with pain- 
ful and monotonous reiteration, these ob- 
ligations are repeated, "I will conceal 
and I will obey," "I will conceal and I 
will obey." And this obligation to secrecy 
and obedience is enforced by death pen- 
alties or threats of dire disaster of one 
sort or another. I have often reminded 
you that Freemasonry is the mother of 
all modern secret societies. That the ob- 
ligations of Freemasonry are enforced by 
death penalties all who have studied the 
system but a little know. "Throats cut 
across, tongues torn out, hearts and vitals 
removed, bodies cut in two, bowels 
burned to ashes, skulls smitten off, heads 
smitten off, representations of the pangs 
of hell," these are the methods adopted 
by Freemasonry to insure the keeping of 
the oaths to secrecy and obedience. 
Lodge men tell you that these penalties 
signify nothing, that nobody is being 
killed and that the penalties are mere 
trifling things. It is safe to say that no 
man who has taken these penalties and 
who feels that he ought to break his oath 
considers them lightly, and it is beyond 
doubt true that no one but God Himself 
can tell how many men have been killed 
under these penalties in lodges or in 
other secret places. Of course, an or- 
ganization which swears its members to 
secrecy and to obedience is necessarily 
the antagonist of a free, civil govern- 
ment. There is not a lodge man within 
the hearing of my voice who, if he will 
stop and think, will not say that this is 
true. 

Lodge Crimes and Criminals. 
Aside from the consideration which I 
have already mentioned, which shows 
that the lodge government is a direct an- 
tagonist of civil authority, we have spe- 
cial lodge obligations which clearly in- 
dicate the same things. When, for ex- 
ample, the Master Mason swears that the 
secrets of a brother Master Mason shall 



be as secure and inviolable in his breast 
as in the breast of the man who com- 
municates them, murder and treason ex- 
cepted, what does he mean ? What does 
the man who administers the oath mean? 
Murder and treason are not the only 
crimes men can commit. Burglary, high- 
way robbery, arson, perjury, these are 
not any of them murder and treason, and 
yet all of them may be covered by this 
oath. "The secret of a brother Master 
Mason I w T ill conceal, murder and trea- 
son excepted." And why does the Royal 
Arch Mason swear after he has taken 
this oath that he will conceal the secret 
of a companion Royal Arch Mason, mur- 
der and treason not excepted ? And why 
was it that the great rebellion against 
the authority of the United States was 
plotted in Royal Arch chapters rather 
than in Blue Lodges, except that the 
Blue Lodge Mason was not sworn to con- 
ceal murder and treason, while the Royal 
Arch Mason was? Out from that trea- 
son thus plotted and planned grew the 
most stupendous rebellion known to his- 
tory. Three hundred thousand northern 
soldiers lie today in national cemeteries, 
dead on field of battle or in hospital, and 
it is fairly to be assumed that enough 
men died in homes of diseases induced 
by the war to raise this number to one 
million men. The number slaughtered 
on the side of the South was nearly or 
quite as great, and yet this infamous 
treason, causeless and wicked, was all 
the while protected by the Royal Arch 
oath. If men should be planning treason 
today in Royal Arch chapters no Royal 
Arch Mason would have a right to men- 
tion it to the civil authorities, because his 
oath forbids him to reveal the secrets of 
a companion Royal Arch Mason with- 
out exception. 

The Lesser Crimes. 
I speak of these under the head lesser, 
not because they are themselves less ig- 
noble, but because they are personal ra- 



110 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



ther than collective. One man goes out 
to kill or steal. If he is a lodge man, 
what is the relation of his brother lodge 
man to his crimes? The relation is, first, 
he is bound to conceal them ; and in the 
second place, if he is in danger because 
of them, he is bound to help him if he 
can. Judge after judge has declared that 
lodge men have sought to secure immun- 
ity from punishment because of their 
lodge relations. Detectives tell us that 
Masons and other lodge men appeal to 
them as Masons for protection and help. 
Sometimes they get it ; sometimes they 
do not get it, but it is understood that the 
oath governs the case, that they have a 
right to appeal for aid to their lodge 
brothers, and that if they do not get it 
they have a right to be disappointed. The 
same principle operates when a lodge 
sheriff has charge of a convicted brother 
lodge man ; the same principle acts when 
a lodge witness is on the stand and a 
brother lodge man is on trial. Of course, 
a juror or a judge is in the same condi- 
tion ; in every case the lodge oath is di- 
rectly antagonistic to the civic duty of 
all concerned. Men tell us that they 
would in every case perform their duty 
to the state and would never on any oc- 
casion allow their lodge obligations to 
interfere. This is well for them to say ; 
it is to be hoped that it is true, but the 
question is not what individuals will do 
but what the lodge requires. And no 
man has studied the lodge teachings who 
does not know that the lodge teaching 
is that lodge men are to befriend, aid 
and assist brother lodge men engaged in 
difficulties, whether they be right or 
wrong. 

What Will Time Do? 
Men, when considerations such as have 
preceded are adduced, say, "What is the 
use of trying to scare us? Our country 
has stood more than a hundred years. It 
will stand forever. We shall never be- 
come the victims of a tyrant, our free 



institutions can never be destroyed." Men 
who speak thus are very thoughtless, or 
they are poorly read in history. We are 
the first people who have adopted self- 
government ; we are the only people who 
have adopted self-government with the 
advantage of a decided Christian founda- 
tion therefor. Our fathers loved the 
church of Jesus Christ and the public 
school system so that they were wulling 
to sacrifice time, money or life itself for 
them. For this reason we have the na- 
tion we see and we have set the example 
which has been so powerful among the 
nations of the earth. But suppose the 
Christian foundation of our government 
be destroyed, what then? We are told 
that the president and vice-president of 
the new Chinese republic are Christian 
men ; we are told that already they have 
decreed the observance of the Christian 
Sabbath and the freedom of the Christian 
religion throughout that vast and ancient 
empire. If this is true, there is hope ; 
but what will occur if the Christian foun- 
dations are destroyed and a pagan reli- 
gion, such as is taught by all the lodges 
of our country, should become the na- 
tional faith ? There is no reason to sup- 
pose that free governments which have 
been caused by Christian teaching will 
stand indefinitely after the Christian 
foundation has been removed. If our 
churches should become lodgified, should 
become unitarian in character and pagan 
in morals, what then? Men talk as if a 
hundred years were a long time for a 
nation to exist, and as if the nation was 
necessarily immortal because its birthday 
was one hundred thirty years ago, more 
or less. But it required a thousand years 
for Rome to die. Who is to say that our 
government will fare any better than the 
ancient republic of the Tiber? 

No man looks at the present moral, re- 
ligious, and governmental situation in 
our country without trembling, if he is a 
thoughtful man and has read history. 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Ill 



As in olden times, when an enemy 
threatened the coasts, beacon fires blazed 
out, hill answering to hill, and clans mus- 
tered to do or die for native land. So 
in our time, while lodges are appealing 
to ambition, to avarice, to love of home, 
to every passion, praiseworthy and ig- 
noble, and when lodges are giving their 
pagan instructions to millions of men and 
women ; in a time like this, the beacon 
fires ought to blaze out and the nation 
ought to be aroused. 

What Can You Do About It? 
This coward question has always been 
thrown in the teeth of every advance 
movement which the human race has 
made. It is a question for slaves and not 
for freemen. What can we do about it? 
Can we not do as much as our fathers 
did ? They went to dungeon and block 
and rack and stake for their faith, and 
we have inherited the civil and religious 
privileges which we enjoy as the fruit 
of their suffering and toil, and when an 
enemy threatens all these priceless herit- 
ages and it is proposed to make an ad- 
vance against them we are asked, what 
can we do about it. What did the people 
of New York city do with Boss Tweed 
and his companion thieves who asked 
this question ? Is it true that with all our 
enlightenment and with all our civic pow- 
er we are not able to preserve the liber- 
ties which our fathers wrested for us 
from the hands of kings and priests? 
Can France and Italy and Spain and Por- 
tugal banish the Knights Templars, ban- 
ish the Jesuits, and are we so impotent 
that we cannot do the same ? Can Mex- 
ico prohibit religious processions and 
even the appearance of monks in uniform 
on the streets of its capital city, and are 
we the helpless victims of two or three 
new-made cardinals and a handful of 
bishops and a host of priests? Are the 
secret societies which exist by sufferance 
of civil government become so strong 
that they can snap their fingers in the 



face of the nation and state and city, and 
insolently ask us what we propose to do 
when we find that they are undermining 
every institution in which honest citizens 
have a right to be interested? This im- 
portant question ought to be answered 
in a very positive way by the people of 
our time. Shall it be ? That is for you 
to determine, and remember that time is 
hastening and that the issues are for 
eternity. 



f&itoriaL 



TRAPS FOR YOUNG BIRDS. 

Back to dormitories and halls in regu- 
lar autumnal migration come flocks of 
returning students, accompanied by flut- 
tering additions from home nests in high 
schools. Which college to attend has 
been a primary question with the callow 
recruits, which dormitory to live in fol- 
lows as secondary, and there comes a 
time when a glowing interrogation point 
will seem to burn above fraternity port- 
als. Already a kindred society question 
has doubtless arisen for some of them in 
high schools, though strong and sweep- 
ing efforts to abate a recognized nuisance 
there have not failed of great and prog- 
ressive effect. Before reaching college 
a student is liable to have arrived at some 
kind of secret society trouble. For in- 
stance, nine young ladies who accepted 
appointment as ushers for a high school 
graduation in a New England city, lately 
obliged the School Board to vote in spe- 
cial session that "It is the sense of the 
school committee that the Juanita and 
Ion organizations violated the spirit of 
the rule of the committee in its vote of 
January 2, 1912, referring to secret so- 
cieties, and members thereof are not elig- 
ible for any appointive or elective office." 

Difficulty of this sort is not sure to be 
left behind in passing out of the school 
door; it may again confront the fresh- 
man at the college gate. A new entrance 
requirement, liable to be copied widely, is 
named in a resolution lately presente 1 to 
the board of regents of a state univer- 
sity. It asks for a rule that every high 
school eraduate seeking- admission to the 



112 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



university must bring a certificate, signed 
by the principal, the superintendent, and 
the local school board, who give their 
threefold assurance that he belongs to 
no high school secret society. It is held 
that a duty devolves upon the governing 
body of this public educational institu- 
tion to carry out the law which has been 
upheld by the supreme court, in the dis- 
charge of which it is necessary for them 
to exclude from a university provided, 
supported, and managed by the state, 
members of unlawful cabals, already vio- 
lators of law and apt to bring in an ele- 
ment of discord. This threatens the 
"kid frat" with the chance of finding the 
door of the state college barred. 

In some colleges though no such rule 
has been met at the entrance, plain busi- 
ness sense has, nevertheless, given strict 
scrutiny to the product of the class room. 
Sacrifice of life again and again on the 
altar of intiation, has not wholly fixed 
the attention ; sacrifice of character has 
not been the only object of attention ; but 
in a business-like way investigators have 
tested the fraternities at the precise point 
where a college shows warrant for its 
own existence. An educational institu- 
tion is created to educate. Its indispens- 
able product is scholarship. If a frater- 
nity selects promising men but seems to 
check fulfillment of promise in accred- 
ited scholarship, it is open to challenge. 
President Schurmann of Cornell actually 
finds the scholarship of fraternity men 
averaging below that of the rest of the 
college by about four per cent. That is 
like a factory estimate of product, and 
it is impressive. Half a dozen recent 
Dartmouth classes have shown similar 
relative results. Elsewhere the same 
condition of inferiority of scholarship 
has been observed, and it has been no- 
ticed tHat through a long series of years 
acceptance of fraternity initiation at the 
hands of some Greek letter society was 
as good as renouncing all claim to col- 
lege honors. No valedictorian came 
from its fraternity house. For eleven 
years the new president of Amherst was 
dean of Brown, and he was the first to 
collect, tabulate, and publish statistics of 
fraternity scholarship in that university. 
He protested against its relative inferior- 
ity. A fraternity man himself, he de- 
manded a higher intellectual standard 



and greater devotion to mental interests 
in the fraternities. 

A noticeable feature of recent tenden- 
cies has been the shrinking of women's 
colleges from Greek letter evils. This 
is glanced at in a glowing tribute to Mt. 
Holyoke contributed to the Boston 
Herald by President William DeWitt 
Hyde of Bowdoin. He says : 

Seventy-five years ago under the shad- 
ow of Mt. Holyoke there was founded a 
seminary, now grown into a college, 
which has been the model of all the 
schools and colleges for women estab- 
lished since ; and which after much trans- 
formation still retains its leadership in 
the essential aims of its distinguished 
founder. 

Proceeding to enumerate features de- 
serving admiration and praise, he in- 
cludes a brief mention of a memorable 
episode in the history of this noted col- 
lege. 

Founded in eager intellectual ambition, 
it has escaped the most fatal defect of 
the educated woman and the women's 
college — intellectual snobbery. 

Founded in radical democracy, it has 
had the courage to retreat under fire 
from its few hesitating steps into the 
swamps of sorority exclusiveness, back 
on to the solid highlands of equal social 
opportunity for all. 

Wellesley, too, has had its own trying 
episode, creditable to the mind and heart 
of the college bred woman. With less 
complete extrusion of the repellent ex- 
otic native to colleges attended by men 
alone, she has trimmed and clipped in 
the plant that had begun to ripen bitter 
fruit here as at Mount Holyoke where 
she was content with nothing short of 
progressive extirpation. 

The New York Tribune does not spare 
the second rate scholars of the Wesleyan 
University fraternities, though it takes a 
wider view of the question than is pro- 
vided by a single college, saying: 

Some of our college presidents who 
are in full sympathy with all proper ac- 
tivities of student life, and are them- 
selves members of college fraternities, 
have recently called attention to the un- 
reasonably low average of scholarship 
among their students as a whole, and the 
still lower average of the fraternity men, 
generally the picked men most prominent 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



113 



in student affairs. They are not asking 
for prodigies of learning or labor, but 
only for reasonable industry and faithful- 
ness to the purposes for which men pro- 
fess to be in college. Apparently the 
Wesleyan men are in the class thus criti- 
cised. Their "soreness" at seeing the 
honors go to women would be salutary 
if it gave any promise that, left to them- 
selves, they would maintain a higher 
standard. It probably means a continu- 
ance with the lower, unabashed hence- 
forth by the reproach of superior fem- 
inine devotion. 

From instances like these salutary les- 
sons may be drawn by those who ap- 
proach the beginning of a new school and 
college year, which is inclusive of many 
beginnings. New studies for all, new 
scenes, acquaintances and relationships 
of various kinds for many, make the pe- 
riod memorable. Its errors, far out- 
reaching these months, will stretch out 
their slowly trailing length through 
years and decades of regretful lifetime. 
True initial judgments with safe selec- 
tions will shed clear light on the whole 
undergraduate course, and far beyond. 
Young lives will come thronging in ; 
mav wisdom stand waiting at the door. 



HOMOGENOUS. 

An Eastern paper says that "It is re- 
ported from New York that thousands 
of persons who have bought what they 
thought were elk teeth have been swin- 
dled, as it has been found that the jew- 
elry market is flooded with imitations 
made of walrus teeth, which have been 
colored. Elk teeth are very expensive 
and those who promoted the fraud prob- 
ably have been able to clean up big 
profits." 

And what is the whole Elk made of? 
Did they expect his teeth would be gen- 
uine — j us t his incisors and nothing 
else ? When you stop to think of it, what 
would anything genuine do in a secret 
society? Fiction is in the name: Masons 
lav no brick ; Moose, Owls, all kinds of 
beasts and fowls— they are alike feath- 
erless bipeds, and you can't tell one 
breed from another. Their "ancient" 
history is fiction; their moral boasts are 
humbug ; their religion is superstition : 
their wisdom is folly systematized and 



their enlightenment darkness focalized. 
What kind of jewelry fits better than 
fake jewelry? and as for Elks' teeth, 
ask the dentist. Did he ever fill or 
extract one adapted to grazing or 
browsing? 



HAZED SCHOOLBOY MAY DIE. 

Initiators Tied Him to Board and Then 

Dropped Him. 

Philadelphia. — Edward Martin, 14 
years old, of Lansdowne, a freshman in 
the Lansdowne high school, is in the 
University hospital with concussion of 
the brain and internal injuries as the 
result of hazing he received at the hands 
of some of his fellow students. 

Martin was about to be intitated as a 
member of the Delta Sigma society. He 
had left school when he was seized by 
four or five of his friends, tied to a 
board and carried through the streets. 
Every few moments the hazers dropped 
Martin to the pavement. He groaned at 
each drop, but his companions ap- 
parently thought he was shamming. 
Eventually he became dazed and the oth- 
er boys cut the rope that bound him to 
the board and fled. 

The injured boy staggered to his feet 
and began wandering around. He was 
seen by five girls, but he did not recog- 
nize them. They led him to his home at 
94 North Lansdowne avenue, where he 
lives with his widowed mother and his 
grandmother. He was put to bed and 
removed to the hospital Wednesday. 

The boys who did the hazing are be-' 
ing protected by their companions and 
their names have not been revealed. 
Martin mav die. 



No country has been more thoroughly 
dominated by the Lodge than Italy. A 
most remarkable conflict between the 
courts of that country and the Cam- 
mora lodge has been in progress now for 
some five years, and has resulted in 
victory for the country. We hope to 
give an account of this secret society in 
some future Cynosure. 



Measure your minister not by the 
number of door bells he rings, but by 
the impulse he gives the community to- 
ward God. 



114 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



President Blanchar'd's address appear- 
ing in this number was given before 
some four hundred thoughtful people of 
Waterloo, Iowa. It is the custom of 
those people to celebrate our Independ- 
ence Day by a social gathering at which 
is given an address on some important 
theme bearing upon the interests of the 
country. This year they chose secret 
societies. What an ideal plan for ob- 
serving such a day. Theirs is indeed a 
"sane Fourth." 



One of our office force for a number 
of years was Mr. Ralph B. Grove. He 
left the Association for what he consid- 
ered a more responsible position and was 
succeeded by Miss Alice E. Hitchcock, 
daughter of the late J. M. Hitchcock, 
who was for so many years a prominent 
officer and worker in our Association. 
We are gratified to be able to announce 
the marriage, on July 13th, of these two 
young people, Miss Hitchcock and Mr. 
Grove, at the home of the bride, by Rev. 
E. Y. Woolley, of the Moody Church, 
Chicago. They are at home, 2032 Howe 
street, Chicago. We feel sure that these 
Christian young people have chosen 
wisely and we unite with their many 
friends in offering: congratulations. 



A man who is too timid to oppose any- 
thing but ancient evils or condemn dis- 
tant sins is too timid to be a herald of 
the Lord. 



If there were more Daniels striving 
for the right, there would be more lions 
afflicted with the lockjaw. Of the Chris- 
tions driven out of Jerusalem by per- 
secution, it is said that they went every- 
where preaching the Gospel. No one 
ever accused them of having the lock- 
jaw. 



Do you know a book that you are 
willing to put under your head for a 
pillow when you lie dying? Very well; 
that is the book you want to study 
while you are living. There is but one 
such book in the world. — Joseph Cook. 



In such a land and at such a time it is 
of sovereign importance that the pulpit 
should be without a fetter. 



ARTIFICIAL CONSCIENCE. 

Has not the phrase at length been 
coined which names with precision what 
no student of secret' orders can fail to 
discover? Conscience seems to suffer dis- 
tortion under the torsion of secret so- 
ciety ritual and influence. In "Morgan 
Times" there seemed to be men who 
verily thought with themselves that they 
would do right to kill the man who 
served light rather than darkness. In our 
own time we have heard such a principle 
endorsed by those of whom you would 
not dare breathe an accusation of ordi- 
nary murder. "Artificial conscience" 
seems to fit the case. There is great 
force and sterling worth in these words 
of Rev. John Snyder: 

"John Fiske gives an illuminative il- 
lustration of this vital truth. He is de- 
scribing the death bed of Philip II of 
Spain. The king sent for his confessor, 
and for three days they jointly searched 
the royal conscience. At the end of that 
time Philip declared that he failed to 
find the trace of a single sin which de- 
manded priestly absolution. Mr. Fiske 
says (I quote from memory) : 'Perhaps, 
in the providence of God, it is impossible 
for any human soul to reach perfection 
even in evil. But, if Philip left any 
crime uncommitted, history failed to re- 
cord it. With the possible exception of 
the first Napoleon, he was the worst man 
in the annals of modern history.' Was 
Philip a conscious hypocrite? Not at all. 
But he dethroned his natural conscience, 
stifled his natural affections, destroyed 
his natural sense of mercy and justice, 
and died, as he had lived. 

"The most significant illustration of 
the awful truth Christ had. in mind is 
shown in the history of that great re- 
ligious order which was created to check" 
the spread of Protestantism. Beyond 
question Loyola was absolutely unselfish 
and disinterested. He believed that the 
Catholic faith was the most precious 
thing in the universe, that everything in 
life must be subordinate to the hope of 
its success. The members of his society 
were pledged to an absolute, unques- 
tioning obedience to an external author- 
ity. Those members showed their en- 
tire sincerity by deeds of devotion and 
courage almost unmatched in the story r 
of religious missions. But, as a Catho- 



Auarust, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



115 



lie writer says, they were at times driven 
from almost every Catholic country on 
both continents. For the same men wlio 
penetrated the untracked forests of Can- 
ada, converting savages, would have 
been just as ready to falsify history, 
justify unveracity, or plan for the assas- 
sination of a heretical monarch, had 
these crimes been demanded by the di- 
recting head. It means the creation of 
an artificial conscience, and so of arti- 
ficial virtues and artificial sins." 




ELLIOT WHIPPLE, I9OO. 

APPRECIATION. 

By President Blanchard, of Wheat- 
on College. 
It will be a surprise and sadness to 
thousands of our readers to know that 
Professor Elliot Whipple is no longer 
with us. Most, perhaps all, of our read- 
ers, know that a year ago he asked leave 
of absence and went to California with 
Mrs. Whipple. He found delightful 
friends there, as he did everywhere, and 
was much improved in health. After 
about a year in Pasadena he went to 
San Diego, thinking that the climate 
there might be in some respects more 
helpful. He was sorely afflicted in the 
death of his grandson and son, but was 
cheerfullv submitted to the will of God 
in these as in all other providences. But 



the tremendous brain and heart which 
had done their work for seventy years 
were through, and very quickly he passed 
out of sight and the dear dust was laid 
away, there by the western ocean. 

This was not a life to be disposed of 
in a paragraph or in a pamphlet. I knew 
him well for more than thirty years. I 
recited to him when I was in college 
and have sat in faculty with him for 
twenty-five years. I record it as my de- 
liberate judgment that for clearness and 
accuracy of mind and for soundness and 
purity of heart, and for courage and 
strength of purpose he was such a man 
as the world seldom sees. At the recent 
meeting of our Board of Trustees his 
name was placed on the faculty page as 
Professor Emeritus, his resignation hav- 
ing been accepted and a small pension 
allotted to him during life. We did not 
anticipate the sudden end of this noble 
career, though we knew that the call 
might come at any time. We record here 
our gratitude that we have been permit- 
ted to know and labor in such absolute 
fellowship so many years and devote 
ourselves anew to the high and holy task 
at which we have together labored. 

My association with him has been de- 
termined by three relations : For nearly 
thirty years we were members of the 
same church ; for about twenty-five years 
we were fellow teachers in the college, 
and for more than thirty years we were 
associated in the work of the National 
Christian Association. In everyone of 
these forms of service he was remarkable 
for clearness of insight, sternness of in- 
tegrity and self-sacrificing devotion. 
When he was drawing from the college a 
salary of about a thousand dollars lie 
was earnestly desired to take a position 
in New York city, where the work- 
would have been practically nothing and 
the compensation would have been three 
thousand dollars per year. He not only 
declined the position in New- York, I 
think he declined even to consider it. T 
doubt if for a single instant it was even 
a temptation to him. He considered the 
work of a teacher not as a means of 
livelihood, but as a divine vocation. T 
think he would have considered a change 
to such a position as was sirnTested not 
a mistake but a sacrilege, lie had the 
feeling of priesthood in his life task and 



116 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



looked upon himself as an anointed one. 

It was just so in his work for the Na- 
tional Christian Association. He served 
on the Board of Directors for many 
years. He was on the Investment Com- 
mittee and in various capacities served 
the Association. And this also he con- 
sidered an opportunity for glorifying 
God and helping men. The same con- 
victions which made him opposed to 
secret societies made him a life-long en- 
emy of the liquor trade. He voted for 
many years patiently and consistently and 
cheerfully for the Prohibition party. The 
fact that his candidates were not elected 
did not worry him ; he was not trying to 
elect candidates, he was trying to do his 
duty and set an example which, if uni- 
versally followed, would have remedied 
three-fourths of the political evils of our 
time. 

For the past five or six years his 
strength has been failing. He went to 
New York for a surgical operation about 
that many vears ago. The operation was 
successful, but his recovery was neither 
so rapid nor so complete as we had 
hoped. He was compelled to omit a 
great many things which he was accus- 
tomed to do. He declined re-election to 
the Board of Directors of the National 
Christian Association ; he ceased to at- 
tend evening meetings except on rare oc- 
casions ; he finally lessened his teaching 
work somewhat and took more rest dur- 
ing the day, and at last he went to Cal- 
ifornia, thinking that possibly he might 
gather up strength enough to teach a 
little longer, but knowing when he went 
that this was not, humanly speaking, 
the probability. 

I had hoped that he might die among 
us. I thought that the lesson of such a 
life as his would not be quite complete 
without the quiet home going and the 
assembly of his friends to look for the 
last time upon his wasted but noble face. 
It seemed to me that the only proper 
place for him to be buried was on the 
grounds of the college which he had 
loved so long and served so well. These, 
however, are comparatively trifling mat- 
ters ; so that the life be well lived, the 
incidents of death and burial are negli- 
gible. It would have been pleasant if 
we could have had him with us, but it is 
well that he is with the Lord. It is safe 



to say that there will not be one of all 
the hundreds and thousands of students 
whom he instructed who will not learn 
of his promotion with thankful memories 
and regret that the noble life might not 
have been longer continued. We may 
say confidently of him what used to be 
so frequently said of the departed, "He 
rests in peace." 



ELLIOT WHIPPLE. 

Elliot Whipple, son of Ira and Phide- 
lia (Davis) Whipple, was born Sept. 
ii, 1842, at St. Johnsbury, Vt. He re- 
ceived his preparatory education at the 
Academies in Colebrook and Orford, N. 
H., and entered Dartmouth College Aug. 
24, i860. 

Immediately after graduating, he 
went to South Dartmouth, Mass., as 
Principal of a private Academy, remain- 
ing there for a year and a half. From 
1866 to 1867, he was Principal of the 
High School at Fairhaven, Mass. Dur- 
ing four months in the summer of 1867, 
he was employed by the Freedmen's Bu- 
reau, in the Department of Education, 
being stationed at Lafayette, Alabama. 
In the fall of 1867, he became Principal 
of the Preparatory Department of Whea- 
ton College, which position he occupied 
until 1869, when he was elected Tutor 
of Natural Science and Latin. After one 
year's service in this capacity he was 
elected, in June, 1870, to the Professor- 
ship of Natural Science in the same in- 
stitution where he continued until Aug. 
1872. He then accepted the position of 
Professor of Mathematics in Westfield 
College, 111., where he remained one 
year. He spent the summer of 1873 at 
Penikese Island, as a student of the late 
Prof. Louis Agassiz. In the fall of 1873 
he became Principal of the Academy at 
Bunker Hill, 111., where he remained two 
years. In 1875 ne returned to Westfield 
College as Professor of Natural Science, 
which position he occupied until the fall 
of 1878. He then went to Mishawaka, 
Ind., where he was Superintendent of 
Schools for one year. In 1879 he re- 
turned to the East, and became Prin- 
cipal of McGaw Normal Institute at 
Reed's Ferry, N. H. After seven years' 
service here he became Superintendent 
of the Ramona Indian School, at Santa 
Fe, New Mexico, in 1886, but the fol- 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



117 



lowing year returned to Wheaton Col- 
lege as Professor of Natural Sciences. 
Several years later he was elected to the 
chair of Political Economy and Social 
Science, having spent four summers 
at the Chicago University studying those 
subjects. This position he held until 
poor health required him to ask for a 
leave of absence to California and the 
letter from the Trustees granting him a 
pension was received just after his 
"home going.'" which occurred June 17. 
1912. 

He taught continuously for forty- 
seven years, and twenty-nine years of 
this time in Wheaton College. 

He received the degree Master of 
Arts in regular course, and Ph. D. from 
Wheaton College. 

In 1878 he published a work entitled 
"Analysis of Animals." He was Presi- 
dent of the Merrimac Valley Teachers' 
Association during the years 1880-2. and 
Treasurer of New Hampshire State 
Teachers' Association for five years. 

He was married August 2j . 1863. to 
Miss Samantha B. Tohnson. of Strat- 
ford. N. H. 

The death of his grandson. Harold 
Cogswell Whipple ( a student at Whea- 
ton. two years ago), which occurred 
last November, followed by the loss of 
his only son. Harlan Woodbury Whip- 
ple, who was found dead in his bed last 
Christmas morning, were terrible blows 
to him. 

Professor Whipple is buried in La 
Vista Cemetery. National City, near San 
Diego, Cal.. beside Mrs. Whipple's 
uncle. Mrs. Whipple is now with their 
only daughter, Mrs. Maud Whipple 
Park, at Racine. Wis. 



Among the devoted Christian work- 
ers and agents of the National Christian 
Association was the late John S. Baxter. 
His home has been in Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma, for some time past. We 
learned last month that he departed this 
life at his home on June 17th last. We 
have no particulars, hence, can only 
make the above announcement, and as- 
sure his friends of our high regard for 
Brother Baxter as a Christian and labor- 
er with us in the work of the Association. 



Our readers will find herein the report 
of contributions to the Association for 
the month past. The work demands and 
merits your financial support. We need 
several hundred dollars for the "Free 
Literature Fund" at once, as well as con- 
tributions for the support of the agents 
and for the general expenses. There 
should be also a larger "General Endow- 
ment Fund" to insure continuous work in 
times of panic or "hard times." and espe- 
cially for the enlargement of the work 
of the Association. The late Philo Car- 
penter, to whom so much is due for his 
financial support of our work — he and 
others thought that such a fund ought to 
be at least $30,000. The present amount 
is S7.000. There are readers of the 
Cynosure who could greatly add to this 
amount by bequest. The N. C. A. Treas- 
urer will answer any questions and give 
all the information needed. He invites 
correspondence. 



Ieit)0 of ©ur Work 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 
Free will offerings since last report 
have been received for the N. C. A. 
work from: Rev. E. Y. Woollev, $5; 
Eld. G. L. Coffin. $5 ; E. Brace. $1 ; 
Frank L. Gibson, $1 : Rev. Wm. Harder. 
Si : Alice A. Miller, Si : Geo. W. Shea- 
ley. S25 : Mrs. L. S. L.. 50c: "C. S. M.." 
K.. Iowa. S5 : F. M. Taylor. 25c: Mrs. 
Jennettie Siemiller and family. S4 : Chris- 
tian Reformed Church: Rochester. N. J.. 
$4.03 : Rehoboth. N. Mexico. $5. 



Any information that may be given 
us as to the "Guardians of Liberty" will 
be thankfully received. Is it a secret or- 
der? What kind of an obligation is ad- 
ministered by it ? We have had several 
inquiries recently concerning it which 
we were unable to answer. 



Those interested in the remarks of 
Rev. L. V. Harrell of South Haven. 
Michigan, at our Annual Convention, 
will be desirous of reading his booklet. 
"The Condemnation of Secret Societies." 
the price is only ten cents postpaid. It 
can be ordered directly from Mr. Har- 
rell or from this office. 



118 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

/ give, devise and bequeath unto the 
National Christian Association, a corpo- 
ration created and existing under and by 
virtue of the hues of the State of Illinois, 
and having its principal office at 850 



JJ^est Madison street, Chicago, 



Dollars, 

(or if lands, describe the same) to be ap- 
plied to the uses and purposes of said 
Association, and under its direction. 



THE NATIONAL CONVENTION. 

THE FREE PARLIAMENT. 

Five minute addresses. Rev. Wm. Dil- 
lon, D. D., Editor, "Christian Conserva- 
tor/' presided. 

Rev. Alfred E. Meyer : Mr. Chairman, 
Ladies and Gentlemen. I am afraid that 
Brother Phillips is a Mason and has 
learned how to put a cable tow around a 
fellow's neck and lead him where he 
does not intend to go. At least I have 
been led to this place today by Brother 
Phillips. He sent me a program in which 
he had put my name, and though I felt 
that I was not the proper man to speak 
on this platform today, I also felt that 
I owed Brother Phillips something, and 
hence I came. 

I want to say, that I wish God's bless- 
ing on this National Christian Associa- 
tion, because it has been to me a cyno- 
sure indeed, guiding me into things of 
which I had not the slightest idea. 

I was in Evanston, visiting a brother 
of mine, when he gave me "Modern Se- 
cret Societies," by President Blanchard, 
and coming back to Chicago I read this 
little book, on the way, and I thought : 
"It cannot be ; it is impossible that a 
lodge man is out of the way as repre- 
sented in this book ; and, I thought, what 
cowards we are, if the thing itself is 
really as this book shows it to be. It is 
cowardly for my church not to be fight- 
ing to the finish, against a society that 
has such oaths and such religious princi- 
ples and such ethical principles. This 
book shows that secret societies are 
against Christianitv and against Ameri- 
canism and against everything that 
counts in decent society." I went to the 



office of the National Christian Associa- 
tion. It was the first time I had ever 
been there. I think the clerk thought I 
was one of those Masons that wants to 
study his ritual in a cheaper way than 
buying one. But she gave me the books 
1 wanted, and she told me about Mr. 
Phillips. I visited Mr. Phillips in the 
office again and again and I wish to 
thank him publicly for his help. He 
gave me all the information I asked for, 
and has helped me along in a splendid 
way, not only with exposures, but with 
the books of his library, and showing 
me where to get other books. I have 
made the thing a study, and I dare say 
quite a deep study, because I wanted to 
know whether these exposures were 
tight and correct. I have studied the 
books of that N. C. A. library, quite a 
number of them ; I think the pile was 
about two feet high. And I have gone 
to the John Crerar Library and looked 
up some German books, the language of 
which is more familiar to me, because I 
received my education in Germany, 
though I was born in South Africa. 

I am a member of the German Evan- 
gelical Synod, a church that is independ- 
ent, though descendant of the German 
State Church, which counts as members 
about twenty-six millions of people in 
Germany. Our synod has taken a stand 
on this lodge question by forbidding 
its ministerial members to become mem- 
bers of any secret society. But it does 
not exclude lay members from holy com- 
munion for being lodge members. The 
latter position being caused, I suppose, 
by the opinion that not all laymen have 
sufficient knowledge in Christian things, 
and not sufficient knowledge in affairs 
relating to the lodges, to make them 
really subject to exclusion from the fel- 
lowship of the Christian Church on that 
ground. Now our ministers have been 
in the past conscientious in sticking to 
the church constitution. But in the last 
ten or twelve years we have heard ru- 
mors that down East some of our minis- 
ters were becoming Masons ; and it has 
become a fact that some have broken 
their word to the church, which they had 
given in their own handwriting, and con- 
trary to their vow have become members 
of the masonic lodpe. 

Last year we received a minister here 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



119 



in our North Illinois conference — which 
counts about one hundred and twenty- 
five ministers in its membership — who is 
very frank to state that he is a Thirty- 
second Degree Mason. And when we 
learned that fact, then the fight started ; 
and I am in the fight. 

We have a pastoral conference of 
about fifty members in Chicago, and they 
instructed me to take up that work and 
show them in what respect Masonry and 
other secret societies were wrong, if they 
are, and whether the paragraph of our 
constitution should not be changed so 
that ministers also^may be allowed to join 
the Masons. Those of our ministers who 
want to become Masons do not care for 
the other lodges ; they are too little for 
them. I took up the question, as request- 
ed by the pastoral conference, and gave 
them a paper on the subject. I want to 
say again, just to show my appreciation 
of the work of the National Christian 
Association, that it gives enlightenment 
to the people that is very much needed, 
and instruction of which they had no idea 
of its importance, for the people were 
just as dumbfounded as our ministers 
were, just as dumbfounded as I was at 
these revelations. One interesting result 
of this discussion was that none of them, 
none in our Chicago ministry — not a sin- 
gle one stood up to show that secret so- 
cieties were right, or expressed a wish 
that this paragraph in our discipline be 
abolished, and they be allowed to become 
Masons. 

We have had this paper on Secret So- 
cieties in our conference three times, and 
it is to be read before the conference of 
the Northern Illinois District, which will 
come together next week, that is, before 
the Ministerial of the Northern Illinois 
District ; and it is to be printed. 

And we find that while in the begin- 
ning of this year, the movement from 
the East that this paragraph on lodges 
should be abolished, and which sentiment 
seemed to be dominating the Synod, that 
now even the editor of our principal theo- 
logical church paper endorses the stand 
that our Synod here has taken. The tide 
has turned, and I am absolutely con- 
vinced that there will be a flood of pro- 
test against the lodge at our next general 
conference, which will take place in Lou- 
isville. Ky. And if we can thank any- 



body, we can thank the National Chris- 
tian Association for the information it 
has given, not only to me, but to the pas- 
tors that have been writing to the N. C. 
A. from St. Louis, Mo., Bloomington, 
111., and other places. I say again that 
it is information gathered from the books 
of this National Christian Association 
that is giving us the victory. And that 
is why I say, God bless your work, breth- 
res, you are a synosure — a pole-star in- 
deed to men in a dark night. 



Rev. L. V. Harrell: I went to the 
Michigan Conference. They meant all 
right, but they were mortal cowards. I 
started a revival meeting. Everything 
was going just to suit the devil — noth- 
ing doing. I preached and preached, and 
some of the old stand-bys in the Church 
sat and slept, and I said : By the grace 
of God, I will put a stop to this business, 
and I will wake these up. 

I hit the lodge business a rap and you 
could see the eyes open. The most prom- 
inent men in my church came and said : 
"This will never do ; you are driving peo- 
ple away from the church," and he said, 
"You go ahead and preach Christ and let 
these things alone." I slapped him on the 
shoulder and said : "See here, Brother, 
I am here to preach for Christ, and I am 
going to tell the truth. If you want a 
man to soft soap and whitewash them, 
you have the wrong man. I am going to 
be preacher while I am here. God knows 
if ever a lot of poor sinners- needed a 
minister, you need it here. I will stay 
and fill the place, and I am going to fill 
it, and you can get the other kind just 
as quick as you can do so." In four 
nights we had fifteen conversions and 

a packed church. Mr. and his wife 

had preached there three weeks before I 
came and they said, "Something is 
wrong." And it is my opinion that some 
of the folks knew just what it was, but 
they were afraid to touch it. God gives 
the victory to ministers who do not fear 
the people, but "hear the Word at His 
mouth," and I believe the reason the 
church is not having more victory over 
the world, the flesh and the devil, is be- 
cause the ministers are afraid to stand 
up for God in the matter of the lodge. 

I want to tell you that some of the 
best friends I have got in this world are 



120 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



men that have left the lodge business for 
Christ's sake. Here is a brother of that 
kind present before me, who has stood 
beside me right along, through thick and 
thin, and I want to say, he seems as near 
to me as my own brothers. That elevator 
man down in Illinois who made me a 
present of a nice gun last Christmas a 
year ago — it is just a dandy. Some of 
the lodge men said that he gave it to' me 
in the hopes that I would shoot myself 
with it ; but this little token of love and 
good will coming from that source cheers 
me. The harder I fight the devil the 
more joy there is in it and the more vic- 
tory there is in it ; but the more coward- 
ly I am, the more miserable I am. 



Mr. Moses Clemens : I have been 
studying quite a bit about the methods 
that should be used in this warfare. Our 
Savior said to his disciples : "Be ye wise 
as serpents and harmless as doves," and 
there are two extremes to which one 
could possibly go. I think it is necessary 
that we should be gentle, be patient, and 
yet, on the other hand, we must remem- 
ber that we are under obligations to Al- 
mighty God, and under obligations to 
Christ, to be faithful. And sometimes 
it is difficult to know just where to draw 
the line between patience and faithful- 
ness. I think both can be combined. We 
can be patient and at the same time we 
can be faithful to God Almighty. We 
should deal gently with our fellowmen 
who are in error, considering that they 
are in a pitiful position in one respect, 
from one point of view, in a very pitiful 
position, and hence it is proper and right 
that we should deal gently with them, 
and yet at the same time be faithful in 
giving them the light, showing them 
what is wrong, as well as what is right. 

There are some who would give us the 
advice : "Preach the Gospel and let other 
things alone," and I recall what is said 
in Hebrews : "Thou hast loved righteous- 
ness and hated iniquity." Now, it is not 
only necessary that we love righteous- 
ness, but we need to hate iniquity, if we 
would be like our great Master; and in 
order to teach people rightly and bring 
them into the light — bring them to real- 
ize what is right and what is regular — 
it seems to me it is necessary not only 
to be positive and tell them what is right, 



but it is also necessary, on the other hand, 
to tell them what is wrong, and get at 
both sides of the thing; and thus we shall 
be able to teach them more clearly and 
more effectively. 

It was when I was a boy that I first, 
came into touch with the work of the 
National Christian Association. My 
father was always opposed to secret or- 
ders, and I remember that when the 
Grange organizers came around to set 
up their lodges, he sent in to Chicago to 
the National Christian Association to se- 
cure publications. I will never forget 
that speech I heard Ronayne give in Lin- 
coln's Hall. He went through the third 
degree that night, and the two previous 
evenings he went through the first and 
second degrees. I was there the third 
evening and saw him give the third de- 
gree. It made a lasting impression on 
my mind. I have since had no sympathy 
for the great lodge system. 

I grew up to manhood and made teach- 
ing my profession for a while, and later 
on felt called to preach the Gospel, and 
from that time I have been both preach- 
ing and teaching. About three years ago 
I went from my home away out to West- 
ern Canada, and there I took a school and 
taught for a while.. I was out there for 
two years, and Brother Phillips will re- 
member well that I got into fresh com- 
munication with the head of the National 
Christian Association, and also corre- 
sponded with different persons East and 
West, from ocean to ocean. A lot of 
those letters by Doctor Torrey were sent 
me, and I would enclose a copy and send 
it to different parties throughout Canada. 
Sometimes I would simply send a letter 
of inquiry to find out just what the in- 
dividual felt or thought with respect to 
secret orders, and then perhaps the next 
time I would send some more ammuni- 
tion and give them to understand on 
which side I was, and then probably I 
would hear no more from that quarter. 
I received letters all the way from Nova 
Scotia. I received a letter from a Scotch 
Covenanter minister from the United 
States. He wrote a very pathetic letter. 
He said he was entirely alone in that 
town. His brethren in the ministry in 
the town where he was, treated him very 
kindly, but they had no sympathy with 
him in his attitude toward secret orders. 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



121 



He wished that someone could come that 
way and stop and address the people, so 
that the people would find out that his 
people were not the only ones who were 
opposed to the secret lodge svstem. I 
sent letters to Montreal to a French pro- 
fessor in one of the institutions of learn- 
ing there, and he replied and stated that 
he was in full sympathy with Doctor 
Torrey in his attitude toward the secret 
lodge system. I sent letters to Norwe- 
gians and others. I wrote letters in dif- 
ferent languages. I had the time and I 
took some of my spare time to write let- 
ters and correspond; and I wrote letters 
for publication in the Cynosure. I tried 
to stir up the people in this way, for 1 
was interested. I thought that the work 
of inducing the leading men and women 
to come out of the lodges ought to be 
pushed. 

I believed that we should be wise in 
prosecuting this work, that we should be 
gentle and patient toward our fellow- 
men, yet we should be faithful and push 
this work. Doctor Dillon and I are try- 
ing to do what we can in Huntington, 
Ind. I am hoping that we shall be able to 
organize a league in that town and hold 
meetings at least occasionally and let the 
light of them shine, hoping that the dark- 
ness of error and all sin will be more 
and more dispelled. 



Rev. J. J. Hiemenga of Michigan : I 
haven't very much to say. I am, perhaps, 
one of the youngest men here, and of 
least experience, especially. 

It seems to me in order to do effective 
work in this line, it is first of all neces- 
sary that we have a firm and positive con- 
viction founded upon facts. And a con- 
viction that what we are working for is 
really worth while. That we have good 
reasons for spending our strength and 
spending our efforts in this cause. 

The first question for us to settle 
should be : Is the lodge system really 
wrong? Now, as long as we remain 
half-hearted as to this, question, we will 
never be able to do effective work. I 
have thought more than once that the 
lodge is not so bad, after all. Now, that 
may sound rather strange here. Let me 
explain myself. If a man has no Chris- 
tianity or no sincere faith in Jesus Christ, 



what can you give him better than lodge 
religion? 

Mr. Dillon : Give him nothing. 

Mr. Hiemenga : Let me explain my- 
self further. Two years ago I heard Dr. 
Gray of Moody's Institute give an excel- 
lent address before the National Chris- 
tian Association on the topic, "The 
Counterfeit of Christianity." Now, Satan 
has tried to give, as nearly as he can, a 
counterfeit of the Christian Church. This 
simply means that man cannot get along 
without something. He must have some- 
thing. So it is but natural that man is 
going to look for something, and that 
Satan is going to give him something. 
Now a man without Christ and yet with 
a desire and with the necessity in his 
heart to have a religion, he thinks he 
finds a pretty good thing in the lodge. 

How can a man become righteous be- 
fore God? One of two answers must be 
given. He can become righteous through 
Jesus Christ, but if he does not see that 
way and believe that way he will try to 
find out some other way, and he finds the 
way the lodge teaches. The question 
must be answered, my friends, and ft 
seems to me as long as man is a creature 
of God he is going to ask that question, 
which must have an answer. Without 
Jesus Christ, the natural answer is given 
by the religion of the lodge, the anti- 
Christian religion, or salvation by works. 

The second thing for us to do is to 
instruct. Instruction is a wonderful 
method and it brings wonderful results. 
Not only to those that oppose the lodge, 
or have not yet entered the lodge, but 
also to lodge members. The great ma- 
jority of lodge members do not know 
what the lodge is ; they don't know the 
wrong there is in it ; they are simply in- 
duced to become members and they do 
not take the time to study the system as 
such ; they do not stop to think that the 
lodge itself is a religion. They claim it 
has some religious elements, but they 
do not believe and they do not see that 
the lodge is a religious institution. We 
don't know the results from the work of 
this Association. Sometimes a man walk- 
ing in Christ gets discouraged because 
he sees no results. There are more re- 
sults than we know, and the best meth- 
od to oppose secrecy and to get results 
is to convince men that the lodge is 



12; 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



wrong; and the way to do that is by in- 
structing; the people. Show them the 
wrong that is in the lodge and let the 
light of Jesus Christ, the light of the 
Gospel, shine upon them. 

When I got back from that convention 
two years ago, I preached four sermons 
on the lodge on four successive Sunday 
evenings. I announced it beforehand, 
that I would speak about the lodge. 
Every time I could see that the audience 
was larger. I said to them : "If I make 
a statement that is not true, let me know 
and I will retract it openly from the pul- 
pit." Now, one man tried it. I had 
given some quotations from the rituals 
that I got at the convention, and made 
a statement in one of my sermons that 
a man who became a Knight of Pythias 
had to kneel before the coffin and take an 
oath. A man wrote me, not signing his 
name, that that was not true. The next 
Sunday night I read that letter. I said 
the charge is partially true. When the 
writer claims that when a man becomes 
a Knight he does not kneel before the 
coffin, he is correct ; but he cannot be- 
come a Knight unless he first becomes a 
Page, and that is the time he takes the 
oath, when he becomes a Page. Now the 
results were marked. Some people came 
to me when I showed them the ritual and 
said : "You have it correct, all right." 
One was a young man. I said : "I thank 
you for the statement and I will make 
use of it Sunday night in the pulpit." 



Mr. Phillips : I received a letter from 
Rev. Tanis, the president of the Wis- 
consin association, stating that he would 
be here as a delegate of that association. 
I suppose something has detained him. 
I would like to say before I sit down 
that Brother Hiemenga, who has just 
spoken to you, is a delegate from the 
Michigan association. They are a live 
body and propose to do what he has 
advocated today : instruct people in his 
State during the coming year. 
(To be continued.) 



The minister cannot transform men 
who are not responsive to his touch. 



No mortal on earth is so despicable 
as a pulpit coward. 



STODDARD IN OHIO. 

Bellefontaine, O., July 12, 1912. 
Dear Cynosure: 

Not an hour ago I came across an Odd 
Fellow, who thought I would not be op- 
posed to his order if I could only visit its 
home at Springfield, Ohio, and see the 
good they were doing. 

I said, "What a pity this good is not 
done in a Christian way, in the name of 
Christ," He admitted there were Jews 
and non-Christians in their lodge, but 
contended that their work was not op- 
posed to Christianity. People are often 
doing what they call "good things" and 
what really are good things, taken apart 
from their surroundings, yet these good 
things are used in the destruction of 
souls, by leading from Him who is the 
Author of all good. There can be no 
salvation without the Savior, yet here is 
an institution claiming to be good, and 
to do good while denying the Author of 
good. 

In Lima, O., I met a man, who said he 
had seen a newspaper printed on the day 
of George Washington's funeral, which 
paper gives a detailed account of that 
funeral. It is owned by a Mr. James 
Stewart living near Elida, O. This 
newspaper report i-s said to state that 
there were Masons in attendance at the 
funeral, but that they had no part in the 
service. The holding in the background 
of this show-making organization on 
such an occasion would be in line with 
Washington's expressed disapproval of 
such displays. 

I am finding ample opportunity for 
the use of such strength as God gives 
me. I found Bishop Zimmerman of the 
Mennonite church willing to aid our 
work. With his kind assistance a hear- 
ing was given me at the Slate Hill 
church near Shiremanstown, Pa. My 
meeting in the Harrisburg, Pa. Brethren 
church was not largely attended, because 
of a storm. Some lodge-men were 
among those present. There are many 
ensnared at Harrisburg. It is my hope 
ta respond to the request for lectures and 
that they may be well advertised. Pas- 
tors of some of the churches in this city 
are constantly advertising lodges as good 
institutions, and preaching soecial ser- 
mons in laudation. May God have 
mercv on their souls, and show them 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



123 



the Christian way. With such an army 
of blind leaders no wonder the people are 
befogged spiritually. 

Eight addresses were delivered in ac- 
cordance with previous arrangement in 
the Wesleyan Methodist churches near 
Forksville, Sullivan County, Pa. Our 
good stand-bys, Brethren Wilcox and 
Molyneux, did much for my support and 
comfort. Collections supplied the need 
in travel. There were many additions 
to the Cynosure list. Churches in that 
section are generally found on the moun- 
tains. They live near the stars, and seem 
to get more of Heaven than earth. God 
helped, and it was felt that the meetings 
were well worth the effort. Bro. Wilcox 
is an ex-Odd Fellow and has a very in- 
teresting experience, which I trust he 
will soon give to Cynosure readers. 

At a meeting of the English Synod of 
the Missouri Lutherans gathered in Bal- 
timore, Md., I gathered some twenty- 
five Cynosure readers, renewed old ac- 
quaintances, told of N. C. A., work, and 
arranged for a lecture that, God willing, 
I shall give in the future. The pastors 
in this synod appreciate the help the N. 
C. A. gives and feel encouraged in their 
efforts against the forces of darkness. 

Our old friend, Pastor J. W. Miller, 
of Ft. Wayne, Indiana, preached a doc- 
trinal sermon in which he called the 
lodge by name, as he showed how it op- 
posed Christ and Christianity. We need 
more of this preaching right to the point, 
so that everyone may know what is 
meant. 

Running through Pennsylvania and 
Ohio in the night and day of the 
"Fourth," it was pleasant to note the im- 
proved conditions in the celebrations 
conducted in the cities and towns. There 
was little of the loud firing and much 
that looked as if the oeople were endors- 
ing the "Sane Fourth" so generally ad- 
vocated. 

I find our mid-summer convention is 
welcomed by our friends, for they know 
its value. 

Ohio Convention. 

Last Sabbath I spoke in the Zion Men- 
nonite church where the State conven- 
tion gathers, D. V., July 2Qth and 30th. 
The program is being prepared. All in- 
dications point to a very helpful conven- 
tion. Pastors of the Covenanter 



churches at Belle Center, Xorthwood 
and this city, expect to attend and speak. 
The good convention held in the Breth- 
ren Church, Bellefontaine, last year is 
not forgotten. The results of that gath- 
ering have been most gratifying to 
friends. 

Father T. C. Speer and James Stew- 
art were among our good helpers here 
last year. Mention, has been made of 
the departure of Father Speer, who left 
us in September last. Mr. Stewart's 
death occurred in May. He was an of- 
ficer in the United Presbyterian church. 
An earnest Christian worker. One of 
the best informed anti-secretists the 
writer has ever met. In his study he 
went to the bottom of things. The origin 
of the principles of Masonry in the old 
Baal worship was well known to him. 
He had Masonic books, and showed to 
those in touch with him the teachings 
they advocate. He was not a public 
speaker, but was continually letting the 
light shine upon those with whom he 
came in touch. Our sympathy goes out 
to his bereaved family and to his many 
friends. 

West Liberty and other points near at 
hand are on our list for meetings. On 
the 28th the appointments are at Pan- 
dora and Bluffton. 

Yours In the Work, 

W. B. Stoddard. 



"MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Dyersburc;-, Tenn., July 3. 19 12. 
Mr. Wni. I. Philips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother : I was in Humboldt, 
Tenn., a few weeks ago doing house to 
house mission work. I distributed anti- 
secrecy tracts as I went along. I found 
that the lodges had sapped the life of 
the church in that town. A sister said, 
"Well, we all belong to them. All of our 
preachers are lodge men. They are 
w r rapped up and tied up in secret socie- 
ties themselves and they got all of the 
women and children into them." 

One woman said, "I used to do the 
kind of work you are doing. Sister Rob- 
erson. W T e studied the Bible in our home 
with our children, and God blessed us. 
Miss J. P. Moore came to us. when we 
were in darkness and organized us into 
Bible Bands, and I worked in the Fire- 
side School Work for ten or eleven 



124 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



years, and our children were brought up 
to love and reverence the God of 
Heaven ; but after a while the secret or- 
der preachers began to come to the 
churches, and make big speeches about 
the lodges, and we just went right into 
them. After a while we began to grow 
careless about our "Bible Band" and 
when we did meet we had lost interest ; 
we did not love our Bible lesson as well 
as we did before we went into the secret 
orders. The church services grew cold 
and tiresome to us unless we had a big 
annual lodge sermon, or, some member 
of the lodge having died, we could have 
a big demonstration at the funeral. And 
yet I did not know why we were so cold. 
We stopped taking our Bible paper, 
The Hope, edited by Sister J. P. 
Moore. We did not know why we had 
lost interest. But I see now, since you 
brought these tracts to us, that lodge 
worship is idolatry. We have been try- 
ing to serve two masters." 

I said, "Yes, you are right. The 
lodge is a counterfeit church, a church 
of the devil." I said, "Sister. God told 
His minister to preach the Word. 2 Tim. 
4:1-2. T charge thee therefore before 
God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, who 
shall judge the quick and the dead at his 
appearing and his kingdom, preach the 
Word: be instant in season, out of sea- 
son ; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all 
long suffering and doctrine." 

"Why," I asked, "must they preach 
the Word? 2 Tim. 4:3. 'For the time 
will come when they will not endure 
sound doctrine : but after their own lusts 
shall they heap to themselves teachers, 
having itching ears.' " 

She said, "I see now why my daughter 
quit after they initiated her. She never 
would go back to meet with them. She 
said to me one day, 'Mamma, don't you 
see how wicked the lodges are?' And I 
said to her, T don't see anything wrong!' 
And yet I was growing cold in my mis- 
sion work for the Lord. Sister Rober- 
son, I brought this daughter up in the 
'Fireside School' at home and educated 
her in Christianity, and she could see 
that the lodges were not what I thought 
they were. But I have at last waked up. 
since you have been here with us and 
explained to us the wickedness that is 
in these secret societies." 



She said to me, "God bless you ! I will 
quit the lodges today. How I have 
grieved over the churches in this place," 
she said, "because the young people had 
drifted off to the public dancing hall, and 
card parties, and our young men were 
lounging around the gambling hells, 
while the church is left a widow. Some 
preachers see this condition and some of 
them speak about how the church is dy- 
ing, or growing cold, but they are evi- 
dently afraid to say much ; for if they 
should — the church has so many mem- 
bers that belong to the lodges that they 
would turn that preacher off." 

I said, "Yes, our people have all gone 
into paganism ; as a people they have 
forgotten God, and are serving the crea- 
tures more than the Creator. Rom. 

1 =2S" 

Pray that the Lord may use me for 
His own glory in exposing these wicked 
societies. 

Yours for Christ's service, 

Lizzie Roberson. 



AGENT DAVIDSON'S CAMPAIGN. 
Jena, La., July 10, 1912. 
Dear Cynosure: 

Since my last writing there has been a 
good deal of underground plotting by 
the secret workers of unrighteousness 
to disturb the peace and harmony of my 
church, but God still lives and his truth 
is marching on. This iniquitous work 
was engineered by a rum loving lodge 
preacher, but his ungodly efforts have 
proved fruitless thus far. 

I have visited Willow Glen, Moreland, 
on Bayou Roberts. Bayou Rapides and 
Jena. ?nd sowed the seed. Some, I am 
sure, fell in good soil and will bring 
forth fruit to the glory of God. The 
lodge has planted its seed of corruption 
in Jena, but its hold is not as strong 
upon the people here as in some com- 
munities. 

The Cynosure and the tracts distrib- 
uted, the parlor meetings held and the 
sermons and lectures delivered from 
time to time in my own home town 
(Alexandria, La.) is bearing precious 
fruit to the honor of God. The enemies to 
all righteousness a few weeks ago spread 
the news abroad to the effect that my 
church was going to depose me as its 
pastor and ordain one of their licentiate 



August, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



'.25 



preachers as my successor, but on call- 
ing the church together so as to hear the 
real truth, it was very satisfactorily 
proven that there was no truth in these 
rumors. The licentiate in question pro- 
tested his innocence and declared no such 
movement was on foot to his knowledge, 
and so branded its author as untruthful 
and the "rumor" as false from start to 
finish. 

A very influential man, a school teach- 
er, said to me a few days ago on one of 
the most prominent thoroughfares of 
the city, "Doctor Davidson, I am in full 
accord with you in your stand in our 
city for a reformation among our 
churches and people. You are right in 
your contention against the Lodge Sys- 
tem. I am thoroughly disgusted with 
their blood curdling oaths and obliga- 
tions." 

This good man has promised me a 
written statement. It is an undeniable 
fact that the Secret Lodge System is do- 
ing more to corrupt society, disrupt 
homes, destroy the virtue and sanctity 
of the home, break down the family al- 
tar, stamp out morality, bribe jurors, 
courts, lawyers, and pervert justice, and 
change our republican form of govern- 
ment into a government of despotism, 
than all other influences combined. 

Unless the Christian Church shall 
arise in the power of her might and 
stand square upon the Word of God and 
contend for the faith, and separate her- 
self from the fellowship of lodge mem- 
bers and have "no fellowship with the 
unfruitful works of darkness," she will 
lose her saving power. 

I shall continue to battle for the right 
and stand upon high Gospel grounds. 
Any person desiring addresses on the 
Lodge Question can be supplied by writ- 
ing to 1732 West Elliott St., Alexan- 
dria, La. 

Francis J. Davidson. 



Many a man has been ousted from 
the pulpit simply because he dared to 
preach the truth. 



Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 1514 Jordan St., 
Shreveport, La. 

Rev. John Nelson, 909 E. Lyon St., 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 

Rev. B. E. Bergesen, 1727 West 56th 
St.. Seattle, Wash. 

John Franklin Browne, 43 Catharine 
St., Springfield, Mass. 



It is not by philanthropic agencies nor 
the creation of new societies, but "by 
the foolishness of preaching," that the 
world is to be redeemed. 



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126 CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. August, 1912. 

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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



127 



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128 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1912. 



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CONTENTS 

The Broken Seal, by Sam'l D. Greene.. 130 

"Talk Ye of All His Wonderful 
Works," by Pres. C. A. Blanchard. . 133 

National Christian Association, by Rev. 
E. Y. Woolley 138 

Tribute to John Quincy Adams, by Will- 
iam H. Seward '. . 142 

"The Impudence of Satan," by Rev. J. 
R. Millin 143 

"Jiner" Tells Experiences 144 

The Test of Choice 145 

Italy Defies the Pope 145 

Editorial — 

The Camorra Sentence 146 

Lost in the Woods 146 

Guardians of Liberty 146 

A Labor Union's Honor 146 

University Life Arraigned 147 

The Real Krishna 148 

Obituary— Rev. J. S. Baxter 148 

News of Our Work — 

Minutes of Ohio Convention 149 

Stoddard in Ohio 150 

Agent Davidson's Report 151 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 152 

The National Convention — 

The Open Parliament 154 

Committee on Resolutions Reports.. 156 



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VOLUME XLV. 



CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER, 1912. 



NUMBER 



<J* 



gvtmntl §. (titttnt 



<£ 



From the personal reminiscences by Samuel D. Greene of the abduction and mur- 
der of Captain William Morgan were taken some of the facts so vividly brought out in 
Miss Flagg's "Power of the Secret Empire," which ended in the December number of 
the CYNOSURE. The story has created so wide an interest that we propose to give our 
readers in the next few months some of these facts as recorded by Mr. Greene, an eye- 
witness. — Editor. 



CHAPTER IX. 
My Subsequent Experiences With Masonry. 
The course I had pursued during the 
exciting scenes of the Morgan abduction 
was such as would naturally bring the 
Masons into bitter hostility tome. It is 
not too much to say that they hated me 
with a perfect hatred. Taking human 
nature at what it is, I cannot much won- 
der at it. I was the first to reveal their 
plans to the world, and to take measures 
to thwart their infamous designs. To 
say that this made me enemies which 
have never forgiven me, but have pur- 
sued me with the bitterest feelings, 
would be to say what every candid man 
must see would be the result of my rela- 
tions to the Masons of Batavia. Mason- 
ry was a great power in the State of New 
York, and in the land generally, at the 
time of the Morgan abduction. It was 
only by reason of its great strength that 
it dared defy public opinion, and do what 
it then did. It had got possession of the 
places of power throughout the State. 
It had a mighty sway in matters civil and 
ecclesiastical. It could ruin the business 
interests of any ordinary person against 
whom it chose to set itself in arrav. It 



did speedily ruin my business in Batavia. 
In the latter part of the summer of 
1829, having some business to transact in 
connection with a mortgage on a farm 
in the western part of Connecticut, I 
came back to New England, bringing 
with me my oldest daughter, and taking 
her for a visit to her grandmother's in 
Providence. While staying a few days 
in Providence, I was invited by a Mason 
to go with him over to Pa.wtuc.ket to at- 
tend an anti-masonic meeting that was 
to be held there. I consented. He did 
not then know of my history, but sup- 
posed that I was a Mason still in regular 
standing; nor did I, on my journey over, 
reveal the state of things. The meeting 
was a large one. The speakers, in the 
course of the proceedings, unfolded the 
secrets of Masonry. When the meeting 
was nearly over, and the people were 
going out freely, some one on the stand 
called out and wished to know if there 
was any Mason present who would' con- 
firm or deny what had been said. I rose 
and said in a full, strong voice, that the 
ceremonies and operations, as they had 
been described, accorded very accuratelv 
with those in the lodge with which the 



130 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



late Captain William Morgan was con- 
nected ; that I was a member of the same 
lodge with him, and was well acquainted 
with the method of doing things there. 

No sooner were these words spoken 
than the most enthusiastic greeting was 
given me by the assembly. Men about 
the doors called after those who had gone 
out, "There is a man here who knew 
Morgan, and was in the same lodge with 
him. Come back! come back!" Soon 
the house was packed full again, galler- 
ies and all, and I told the story of Mor- 
gan to most eager and attentive listeners, 
and three Masons renounced masonry 
on the spot. 

Immediately after this meeting, leav- 
ing my daughter at Providence, I started 
for Goshen, in Litchfield County, Conn., 
to attend to the business pertaining to 
the mortgage. But the report of the 
meeting at Pawtucket had been noised 
abroad through the papers, and a mes- 
senger was sent after me with letters to 
persuade me to visit Boston and deliver 
a lecture. The messenger who came was 
Frederick A. Sumner, and he brought a 
letter to me from Dr. Abner Phelps. The 
messenger came first to Providence, and, 
finding I had gone to Western Connecti- 
cut, followed me all the way thither, to 
invite me, in behalf of a most respectable 
committee, to give an anti-masonic lec- 
ture in Boston. I accordingly consented, 
and arrangements were made that I 
should speak in Fanueil Hall on the 
evening of September 8. Handbills had 
been posted all over the city for days, 
giving notice of the meeting. I reached 
the city in due time, and stopped at a 
hotel in Milk street. I found Boston full 
of excitement with reference to the ap- 
proaching meeting. The Masons were 
numerous and strong in the city, and 
they threatened to break up the meeting. 
The anti-masonic party also was full of 
spirit, and was determined to resist this 
attempt. Clubs and billets of wood were 
freely carried into the building, to be 
used in case the exigency should arise 
calling for them. 

When I reached the hall in the even- 
ing, I found it packed. Such was the 
excitement then prevailing about the 
Morgan affair, that there was the most 
intense desire to see any one who had 



been mixed up with that business. When 
I reached the door, so great was the 
press, that I was literally lifted from the 
fioor and borne all the way to the stage 
without once touching my feet. 

But it was evident that the Masons 
were there in great force. I went 
through the preliminary part of my lec- 
ture very well ; but when I came to the 
story of Morgan and his abduction and 
murder, the uproar began. The room 
resounded with cries, "Pitch him out of 
the window !" "Kill him !" "Break his 
neck!" etc., etc. I would wait a little 
for the tumult to subside, and then at- 
tempt to begin again, when the same 
noise and confusion would set in in full 
force. I finished my lecture in the best 
way [ could under the circumstances. 
•Dr. Thompson, of Charlestown, was the 
presiding officer, and he did all he could 
to quiet the storm by appealing to their 
pride as a Boston audience, and in vari- 
ous other ways, but his efforts were un- 
availing. 

Then it became evident that we were 
in some measure besieged by the Ma- 
sons. They had banded together to 
block the doors, and prevent all egress 
of the crowd form the building. They 
were waiting apparently for an attempt 
to be made to get the lecturer and the 
leaders of the meeting out, and this 
would be the signal for violence. It 
was near eleven o'clock when a carriage 
was brought quietly to the back door of 
the hall, and I was taken out by the 
stairway behind the stage, and conveyed 
to my hotel. 

At three o'clock the next morning I 
took the stage to return to Connecticut. 

So full of rage were the Masons, that 
after I left the city, they printed and 
posted up all over the city, in connection 
with my name, some verses from one of 
the imprecatory Psalms — the 109th 
Psalm : 

"Let his days be few, and let another 
take his office. 

"Let his children be fatherless and his 
wife a widow. 

"Let his children be continually vaga- 
bonds and beg ; let them seek their bread 
also out of their desolate places. 

"Let the extortioner catch all that he 
hath ; and let strangers spoil his labor. 

"Let there be none to extend mercv 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



131 



unto him; neither let there be any to 
favor his fatherless children. 

"Let his posterity be cut off; and in 
the generation following let their name 
be blotted out." 

On my return again to Boston some 
little time after this, I saw some of these 
handbills which had spoken in so compli- 
mentary a manner of me. They had 
been preserved by my friends as memo- 
rials of the anti-masonic meeting in 
Faneuil Hall, on the night of September 
8, 1829. 

This was my first introduction to a 
Boston audience, and there was nothing, 
certainly, in the events of that night to 
convince me that it was better behaved 
than other audiences. 

It was not until the January following 
the Morgan murder, that I really broke 
with the Masons, and renounced the or- 
der. I kept my secret until that time, 
though not without falling under con- 
siderable suspicion. But in January I 
publicly seceded, and took my stand 
openly in opposition. I was afterwards 
summoned to attend the lodge ; but giv- 
ing no heed to the call, the Masons took 
their revenge by expelling me, which was 
just as well. Between them and myself 
I was by that time pretty completely out 
of the order. 

From the fall of 1826 on to 1830, I 
was compelled, with thousands of others, 
to be witness of the abortive attempt to 
bring guilty men to justice. Month after 
month, and year after year, the prosecu- 
tions started against the Morgan abduc- 
tors dragged their slow length along. 
Everything would seem to be in train 
for a speedy result ; but the hope was 
always a vain one. Secret hands, out of 
the darkness, were all the while working 
against truth and righteousness. If the 
prophet Isaiah had written some of the 
verses of the fifty-ninth chapter of his 
book expressly to describe what was go- 
ing on in Western New York during 
those years, he could not have hit the 
case more exactly. 

"Therefore is judgment far from us, 
and justice doth not overtake us ; we wait 
for light, but behold obscurity ; for 
brightness, but we walk in darkness. 

"We grope for the wall like the blind, 
and we grope as if we had no eyes. 



"And judgment is turned away back- 
ward, and justice standeth afar off; for 
truth is fallen in the street, and equity 
cannot enter. 

"Yea, truth faileth ; and he that de- 
parted! from evil maketh himself a 
prey.'' 

We will not undertake to tell the weary 
story of those four or five years. But in 
the Appendix we give the story as it was 
told, while yet the subject was fresh and 
new, by Mr. John C. Spencer, of New 
York, in the very able and carefully pre- 
pared report which he presented to the 
'Anti-Masonic Convention in Baltimore, 
in 183 1, having been previously appoint- 
ed for that duty. The story is a long 
one, but we prefer to give it unbroken, 
that it may be understood by the people 
of this generation what a pernicious 
power Masonry is, when it is once fairly 
intrenched in society. 

My own experiences in the courts 
taught me. how useless it was, in those 
times, to look for justice by an appeal 
to law. When the Masons, on every 
hand, set upon me to ruin my character 
and my business, I attempted to gain the 
help of the law, but found, by a bitter 
experience, that no adequate protection 
was to be looked for from that quarter. 
I was compelled to leave it to time to 
vindicate my character and motives in 
doing what I had done. 

The great anti-masonic movement was 
now well under way, and from my ex- 
periences I seemed to be called naturally 
into the field as a lecturer. From 1829 
on to 1834, I was largely employed in 
this way, speaking in a great number of 
places in various New England States. 
Everywhere I went, I had to encounter 
a strong masonic hate. I could not but 
be sensible that hostile eyes were upon 
me, watching every movement. Some- 
times this hatred would break out into 
open abuse and violence, and sometimes 
it kept a more decorous and smothered 
form, but was none the less real. It was 
not pleasant to live in such an atmos- 
phere, surcharged all the while as it was 
with the elements of violence. I knew, 
by a most vivid experience, what had 
been, and T knew that what had been 
might be again. The institution of Ma- 
sonry, though scotched, was not killed. 
It was still bold and defiant, all the more 



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September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



133 



dence was out of the state, the time was 
extended, as was required by law, until 
March, 1830. 

(To be continued.) 



^TALK YE OF ALL HIS WONDERFUL 
WORKS." 

By President Blanchard. 

I have a friend who very strongly ob- 
jects to one's saying that his prayers are 
-answered. It seems to be a sort of a 
mania with him. He says that he prays, 
that he believes in praying, that at times 
the things for which he prays come 
about, but that he does not know whether 
they are answers to his prayers or not, 
and he thinks it is rather a presumption 
to say that this is the case. In his speak- 
ing on this subject he never quotes the 
Scriptures, in fact, though he was train- 
ed as a preacher, he does not quote the 
Scriptures a great deal as an authority. 
He is quite prone to say, "I think," or 
"I do not think." or "I would not dare 
to say.'' One might suppose from this 
remark that he is not a worthy man. On 
the other hand he is one of the best men 
I know. In personal conversation, a 
perfect gentleman, in public address not 
always so careful of what he says, but 
absolutely conscientious and generous- 
minded, one of the sort of men you 
would like to know. It might appear to 
some that the statements above made 
are contradictory. They seem so only 
to persons who are superficial thinkers 
or who do not think. It is one of the 
common-places of human experience 
that men, good men, hold contradictory 
views on subjects which seem to others 
perfectly plain. 

You will remember that Dr. Samuel 
Johnson said, "Probably no man is al- 
together in his right mind." Whether 
we admit this statement in its broadest 
application or not, it is certain that we 
are all finite and that being finite we 
strike our limitations in various ways. 
This is his trouble. In fact after some 



remarks of this kind in a Bible class at 
one time, several of our most thoughtful 
men said that if they believed what he 
said he believed, they would stop pray- 
ing. He was very much grieved, and 
yet it seems difficult to understand why 
he should have been, for evidently he 
affirmed the impossibility of knowing 
whether prayers are answered or not 
and intimated very strongly that the 
prayers of an individual were not likely 
to be answered, and yet, as I have said 
above, he is a thoroughly good man and 
one whom we all value so far as we 
know him, true and staunch for the 
whole truth as he sees it. 

A Case That Is Settled. 

It is wise for us to consider what God 
has actually accomplished and to talk 
about the things which He has done. If 
we do this, some misinformed people 
will think we are boasting of ourselves. 
Nevertheless, we must make our boast 
in God, we must talk of all His won- 
drous works, we must make known His 
great deeds among our people. It is a 
sin and a shame that His church does so 
little of this. More and more let us tell 
out the good things which God has done ; 
let us speak of all His wondrous works. 

Xow one of the things which God has 
unquestionably done and we may say 
finished in this country, is to create the 
impression in the minds of all decent 
people that secret societies in high 
schools are enemies of everv good thing 
that there is in the world. The National 
Teachers' Association which is a most 
august educational conference have vot- 
ed practically without a negative that se- 
cret societies in high schools arc not 
only nuisances but are national perils 
and ought to be abolished. This has be- 
come, as it were, a settled thing in the 
minds of teachers. In the meeting of the 
National Education Association this 
year, held in the city of Chicago, speaker 
after speaker repeated this thought and 



134 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



there was nothing said on the other side. 
There was nothing to be said on the 
other side. The teachers of the United 
States have come to understand that se- 
cret societies in high schools are not only 
injurious, but that they are destructive 
and that they ought to be abolished. It 
is a good thing to know this and it is a 
good thing to talk about it, for it is one 
of the wonderful works of God. 

The boards of education and princi- 
pals who have taken this position against 
secret societies in the high school are 
largely secret society men. One of them, 
Superintendent of Schools in one of the 
largest cities of our country, said to me, 
while his Knight Templar badge was 
hanging on his watch-chain, ''Some of 
my masonic brethren think it wrong for 
me to take the position I do on secret 
societies in high schools, but I tell them 
that I am superintendent of schools in 
this city, that it is my business to protect 
the children and the schools and that I 
am going to do it to the best of my abil- 
ity." The secret society people nagged 
him out of his position, but a better one 
was open to him and his successor, while 
more of a politician and less of a teach- 
er, has not dared to publicly go back on 
his work. 

Recently a number of young men were 
excluded from a suburban high school 
because they were running a secret so- 
ciety. They applied for admission to a 
high school in another city and that 
Board of Education told them that 
they did not propose to help to 
break down a rule of which they ap- 
proved by receiving students who had 
been expelled in accordance with it. So 
let us drive a stake here. The people 
of the United States, a hundred million 
of them practically, have agreed that se- 
cret societies in high schools are a pub- 
lic danger and must be suppressed. Leg- 
islatures, boards of education, Circuit 
and Supreme Courts all are agreed. 



There is no dissenting voice. Let us, 
therefore, make our boast in God. Any- 
one who should suppose that such a re- 
sult as this has been brought about by 
human agency would show his ignorance 
of the way in which national movements 
are produced. 

From One Judge All. 
This is an old Latin motto which 
teaches that when one knows the char- 
acteristics of a class, he knows the char- 
acteristics of each individual of that 
class. When one sees what secret socie- 
ties do in one place he can understand 
what they will do in another place, the 
circumstances being substantially the 
same. I desire to impress upon the 
minds of our readers the fact that there 
is no difference between a young man in 
the fourth year of high school and the 
first year or two of, college which will 
cause a secret society to work in a dif- 
ferent way upon his nature. What a 
fraternity will do for him in high school 
it will do for him in college. Of course 
we know this independently of the recent 
discussion. All students of college fra- 
ternities know that they have been pro- 
ducing the same demoralizing effects for 
many years which we now find them to 
work out in the high schools, but since 
the national opinion has been so deci- 
sively settled as to the high schools, the 
question as to the reason of the case re- 
curs. Why should a young man in col- 
lege be benefited by an organization 
which ruins a young man in high school ? 
The answer is that he will not be bene- 
fited by such an institution. What ruins 
the young man in high school will ruin, 
the young man in college. This is evi- 
dent from the nature of the case and it 
has been overwhelmingly proved in ac- 
tual experience. College fraternities are 
founded upon a mean desire to secure an 
advantage over other persons irrespec- 
tive of desert. Young men join frater- 
nities because they wish to secure un- 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



135 



deserved favors, to carry elections, to 
be able to do things which other men 
cannot do. Of course this is the same 
principle which operates in life after the 
school days are ended. Men who wish 
what they are entitled to by reason of 
their characters and attainments do not 
need or desire the help of lodges, but 
men who want something which they 
feel they do not deserve or which they 
would not be likely to obtain in open 
competition with other men, enjoy hav- 
ing a secret brotherhood to fall back 
upon. It is so in life, it is so in col- 
lege, it is so in high school and the re- 
sults are the same in each of the three 
cases. Men who ought to be self-reliant, 
manly fellows, become pipe-layers, wire- 
pullers, degenerate persons who are 
looking around for some one to boost 
them into positions which they could not 
attain by their own merits. 

Out of the Darkness Dark Deeds Grow. 

Uniting in secret societies for this self- 
ish purpose and without the intention of 
doing anything particularly bad, men 
naturally go on : out of the darkness 
dark deeds grow. A lot of young men 
in college meet in a hall where they are 
secure from public observance and 
where each is obligated to conceal from 
all except his fellows what is done, nat- 
urally do things which the same men 
would never think of doing under pub- 
licity. No man who has studied college 
fraternities a little is ignorant of the 
fact that smoking, drinking, gambling, 
and licentiousness are common-places in 
these fraternities. No sensible person 
would affirm that these vices are prac- 
ticed to the same extent in all fraterni- 
ties. There are fraternities and frater- 
nities, but that the natural tendency of 
these combinations is in this direction, 
no thoughtful person will either doubt 
or deny, and that these results are actu- 
ally working out, no one will deny who 
is conversant with the facts. 



Why should it not be so? What is a 
secret society for? Is it to conceal no- 
ble and illustrious words or deeds? No 
sane person believes it for a minute. \ 
was talking with a gentleman on a Mich- 
igan Central train only this week who 
told me that in his youth he had joined 
the Freemasons, but that for many years 
he had had nothing to do with them. He 
said, however, that he had no particular 
objection to them. Apparently he took 
me for a member of the order. When 
he had concluded his personal testimony, 
I said to him, ''Perhaps you can tell me 
what I have long wished to know. W'hat 
does an honest man need of a secret so- 
ciety?" He replied instantly, "An hon- 
est man has no need of a secret society 
at all." He said, "Men get into them 
when they are young, ignorant and fool- 
ish ; some get out as I have, others go 
along because they imagine that they se- 
cure certain advantages through them, 
but no honest man has any need of any 
secret society." This was his testimony. 
I think it is the testimony of all thought- 
ful people whether in or outside of 
lodges. 

What Have We a Right to Hope? 
Over and again in discussions of all 
moral questions we come up against the 
practical question, "What can you do 
about it?" I believe the liquor shops 
and the lodges would die in one year in 
this country if it were not for this ques- 
tion. It is natural for men to spend time 
for themselves and it is natural for good 
men who would like to do good to spend 
time on other things which they feel sure 
can be accomplished. There is a natural 
indisposition to work at what is pre- 
destined to be a failure. That was our 
great trouble in the slavery question ; 
that is our great trouble in the temper- 
ance situation today ; it is the great trou- 
ble about the lodges. Let me ask the 
reader to stop and think whether he be- 
lieves that inside of ten vears secret so- 



136 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



cieties in colleges will be universally con- 
demned as secret societies in high schools 
are today. I think the average man who 
reads will say, "Xo., I am afraid not." 
Why not ? If the arguments are the 
same in each case and if God has 
wrought a national sentiment of oppo- 
sition in the one case, why should He not 
work a national opposition of senti- 
ment in the other? The only an- 
swer can be. "Well, I am afraid 
He will not." Xo one can doubt that 
the feeling should be the same, but it is 
different. How shall it be made the 
same? The answer is, "What has 
wrought the result in the one case, we 
must rely upon for the other." There 
is no other sane position to take, and if 
God can make a hundred millions of peo- 
ple believe that secret societies are bad 
for a young man in high school, the same 
God can make the same million of peo- 
ple believe that secret societies are bad 
for the same young man when he has 
gone away to college. And if this result 
can be wrought out by the power of God 
then the same power can produce the 
same sentiment respecting secret socie- 
ties among men who have passed out 
from school life. I, therefore, insist 
that we are called upon to more faith 
and stronger testimony and more earnest 
work. 

"Work Out Your Own Salvation." 

That there is a place in the plan of 
God for the will and the work of men 
is beyond question. The Scripture, which 
is above quoted, shows it, "Work out 
your own salvation * * * for it 
is God who worketh in you." Because 
God works. w r ork you. Here we have 
a contradiction of the natural blunders 
of men. Some say if God is working 
men do not need to work, and others say 
if men work properly we do not have to 
rely upon God. The truth is that men 
ought to work because God wills that 
thev should and w r hen they work, He 



works with them ; they accomplish the 
ends which He approves. "Work out 
your own salvation for it is God who 
works in you," This general principle 
applies to social and religious activities 
as well as to those which are merely per- 
sonal. Work because God is working. 
Do not stop work because God is work- 
ing; do not imagine that God has stop- 
ped working or will stop working be- 
cause you are busy ; work because God 
works. This is Scripture and it is also 
reason and anyone who does not act ac- 
cording to this text is foredoomed to 
failure. And when God has accomplish- 
ed great results because men have work- 
ed with Him and in the line of His prov- 
idence and direction, then let him give 
Him the glory and say, "God worked in 
me and for me and therefore results 
have been accomplished." So let all to 
whom this writing comes settle it in 
their hearts that God who has already 
wrought this tremendous miracle before 
our very eyes, is entirely capable of 
working other miracles of like sort and 
let us expect Him to do it and when He 
does it let us praise His name. 
Nothing Secret That Shall Not Be Known 

and Come Abroad. 

I imagine that there are few things 
more difficult for the ordinary man than 
simply to believe what God says. Take 
for example this Scripture. We more 
and more see the insoluable mysteries 
of the police system, murders, thefts, 
which are never detected, which no skill 
nor perseverance of the police are able 
to uncover ; and men say, "How is it 
true that there is nothing secret which 
does not become known and come 
abroad ?" Yet every day this text is 
proven true. Take for example the va- 
rious facts connected with the recent 
expulsion of Mr. Lorimer from the 
United States senate. How carefully 
they were covered ! How many various 
considerations there were which tended 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



in the direction of keeping them cover- 
ed ! How strangely they came out one 
by one, not all at once, but all from the 
same sources, but first one thing and 
then another thing until at last the whole 
dark story is revealed to the public. 
Wealth, political power, perjury, sub- 
ordination of perjury, fear of actual 
slugging and killing were involved, and 
all failing and in spite of everything the 
truth little by little revealed. 

This fact has two bearings. In the 
first place it should encourage people 
who are living in the fear of God and 
in the second place it should terrify 
those who are not so doing. How re- 
splendent is the character of Air. Funk 
in view of all the facts in the case ! Men 
and women and boys hired to perjure 
themselves to destroy his reputation, yet 
when the case comes into court the 
lawyers for the prosecution do not dare 
to cross-examine him. He tells his story : 
it is confirmed by the persons who have 
been hired to blast his reputation, and 
hundreds of thousands of people know 
him for a pure and true man, who with- 
out this infamous conspiracy would have 
had doubt or at least would have been in 
ignorance concerning it. 

From time to time persons write me 
that they are being wronged by other 
people; that their property is being ob- 
tained by some abuses of legal proced- 
ure, or that their good names are being 
destroyed by the malice and the false 
word of evil men. Usually in the cases 
which come to me, the secret society sys- 
tem of our country is involved. Men 
say that the Freemasons or the Odd Fel- 
lows, or both, or some other lodge is 
seeking to rob and ruin them. There is 
no question but that such things are often 
done, and these friends, if they are them- 
selves living as they ought before God, 
should take great courage out of the 
Word and from the Spirit, and by the 
providence of God, for there is no secret 



which shall not be known and come 
abroad. Good deeds hidden in darkness 
will bloom and shine in the light and evil 
deeds done in the darkness are sure to 
come to be seen, first or last, to be that 
which they actually are. Jesus Christ, 
who said that the secret things were 
known to God and should be made 
known to men, is the one who rules the 
universe. The government is upon His 
shoulder, and therefore those who do 
well should be confident, and those who 
do ill should be afraid. 

Expect Great Things from God. 
I think we dwell too much on the 
other side of this great saying, "Plan 
great things for God." I do not mean 
that we do this more than we ought, but 
that we plan more than we expect to do. 
The fact that we expect less than we 
ought hinders us from planning as we 
should. Let us expect great things from 
God. After the miracle of the last ten 
years in China, who is to doubt the 
power of God to work His will among 
the nations of the earth. A man who 
ten years ago should have said that to- 
day China would be exactly where she is, 
would have been counted no better than 
a lunatic. And judged by all human 
standards, he would have been, but there 
is no human way of judging the Divine. 
God does not work as men do. His ways 
are- high above ours and His thoughts 
are high above ours as the heavens are 
high above the earth. We need to ex- 
pect more from God. Let us do so and 
let us talk of all His wondrous works. 
Let us not tell about what we have done. 
or are going to do, or intend to think, but 
let us tell of what God has done. 1 f we 
talk of His wondrous works, we shall 
learn to expect them and if we learn 
to expect great things from God, we 
shall plan great things for Him. 

I find my heart this morning going out 
in great love and expectation toward the 
people of God. I praise Him for all that 



13S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



He has wrought in them and for them, 
and for all that He is to accomplish for 
them and through them. But the days 
are hastening and the need is very great, 
and we should work the works of Him 
that sent us while it is day, for the night 
comes when man cannot work. 



OUR NATIONAL CONVENTION. 

The stenographic report of addresses is con- 
tinued from the July number. They have not 
been revised by the speakers, but we believe 
that there has been no serious failure on the 
part of stenographer to catch their meaning. 
Rev. E. Y. Woolley, Assistant Pastor of the 
"Moody Church," Chicago, took for his sub- 
ject the: 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCI- 
ATION. 

Mr. E. Y. Woolley : I am going to 
speak along an entirely different line 
than I expected to 
when I came here, 
because as I look 
into your faces I 
see our congrega- 
tion is largely made 
up of our own 
members of the 
Association, a n d 
therefore, I want 
to say a word of 
good cheer and in- 
spiration, if I can, 
to you men in this 
fight. I will begin 
right where Rev. Mr. Alexander stopped, 
namely, with the remark of Rev. Dr. 
George who said that "the influential 
movements of today were the sacrificial 
movements of yesterday." We are in the 
sacrificial part of the movement, breth- 
ren. So far we have not attained to the 
influence which this movement, under 
God, I believe, is going to attain to. We 
are in the same position that the abolition 
movement was in the early days, when it 
was looked down upon, when it was 
small, when it was few in numbers, but 
there is a time coming when the truth 
along the line of the real meaning of or- 
ganized secrecy is going to see the light 
of day, and is going to permeate the 
Christian churches. 

I congratulate this organization upon 
its name. I don't know who gave it this 




name, but I believe it must have been 
given by the inspiration of God; for it 
seems to me that our -name has in it 
wonderful sweetness, wonderful helpful- 
ness, and it bounds and surrounds the 
purpose for which we stand. And I 
want to speak for these few moments, on 
the three words which constitute the 
name, National Christian Associa- 
tion. 

This movement is National and against 
that I want to put the statement which 
perhaps not every one of you will ad- 
mit, that the secret society in essence 
and in its rule, is against the nation. 
Granting this is a free country, the se- 
cret society is against freedom. It is for 
a certain, select few. This country is 
built on the proposition that all men are 
created free and equal. The secret so- 
ciety is built on the proposition that all 
men are not free and equal ; that mankind 
is composed of those who are in that 
particular society on the one hand, and 
those who are on the outside on the 
other hand. 

The framework of our government is 
built upon the proposition that every man 
shall have an equal chance. But the 
leading secret society, the Masonic or- 
ganization, of which I was once a mem- 
ber, made me swear the oath, in one 
of its degrees, that in law when the ac- 
cused was a brother Mason, or when the 
accuser was a brother Mason, and the ac- 
cused was not — whichever way it hap- 
pened to be, I was to give my testimony 
in favor of my brother Mason, whether 
he was right or wrong, murder and trea- 
son alone excepted. In other words, I 
was to perjure myself for the sake of 
my secret society oath. And in another 
degree in Masonry, a little farther on, 
a little higher up, they said, but I think it 
was a great deal lower down, I took the 
oath that I was to try to liberate my 
brother Mason if he was the defendant — 
I was to be on his side, give my testi- 
mony in his favor — whether he was 
right or wrong, murder and treason not 
excepted. Now that is treasonable! I 
did not see it at the time because I was 
hoodwinked, but as a matter of fact it 
does not need a very logical man — it does 
not need a very clear thinker, to see that 



iepU-mber. 191 



1IRISTIAX CYNOSURE. 



139 



that policy, carried through, would break 
down the bulwarks of this nation, or any 
nation. 

When we attack and undermine the 
purposes and the justness and the effec- 
tiveness of our public courts,, of our 
courts of justice, we are undermining 
the arch which holds up this free and in- 
dependent nation : no question about 
that. Such a lodge is anti-national. The 
secret society system, by its secrecy. 
often controls the politics of the city, and 
the state and the nation — not for the best 
man. not for the best movement, bin for 
the men who are linked with the other 
politicians in the secret society. I state 
what is still within the facts: if any of 
you have taken the pains to look the facts 
up you know it. that scores and scores of 
the cities of this country in their poli- 
tics are run by secret societies. On the 
north of the Mason and Dixon line one 
of the great parties, if it is in power, is 
run by the Mason-, in scores of our 
cities: on the other side of the Mason 
and Dixon line, if the other one of the 
big parties is in power, it is run by the 
Masons. If the politics of the average 
city in this country today is not run by 
the Catholics, it is run by the Masons, 
<:»r kindred secret organizations. Xow 
friends, it is not only run by the Ma- 
sons, it is run for the Masons, and in 
many a city no man. no matter how 
good a man, how well qualified for the 
office, from the mayor down to the dog 
officer, has any chance of being elected 
unless he is a member of a certain secret 
organization and in the clique which 
names the officers and pulls the wire>. 
That is no exaggerated statement : that 
is a statement well within the facts ; and 
such a condition is all against the wel- 
fare of this country. Xot only is that 
true of the cities, it is true of the states : 
and it is true in a measure of our gen- 
eral government. Xot only is it true of 
politics, it is true of the business con- 
tracts that are placed. There are certain 
business contractors who do business 
with city governments and state govern- 
ments and national governments, that 
could not succeed in business unless they 
were members of certain secret organiza- 
tions, and used that fact in securing these 
government and city and state contracts. 

The X'ational Christian Association. 



therefore, is standing as a protest against 
secretism in these various institutions 
in these Lnited States. It is standing 
for the bottom plan of our government, 
namely, that as far as this country is 
concerned, all men ought to be free and 
equal. 

Second, this association is Christian. 
That ha- already been touched upon 
from one or two angles by the preceding 
speaker. I just want to run over one 
or two points he spoke of, and then one 
or two others. I want to say that the 
secret societies are anti-Christian. I 
know the}" will tell you that a man — for 
instance the Masons tell you : "Oh. you 
have to believe in God before you can 
be a Mason." It is true, that in the very 
opening degree each candidate is re- 
quired to admit that he believes in a Su- 
preme Being, but Masonry takes in Mo- 
hammedans. They believe in a Supreme 
Being : Masonry takes in Jews. They be- 
lieve in a Supreme Being. Masonry takes 
in Deists, or anyone else that will ac- 
knowledge, in the opening degree, that 
he does believe in a Creator. But that 
is verv far from a belief in the true 
God. as revealed in the Word, and in His 
Son. Jesus Christ. On the contrary 
Jesus Christ's name and faith is strictlv 
barred out of the three foundation de- 
grees of Masonry, the Blue Lodge, the 
taking of which degrees makes a man £ 
Mason. It is true the Knights Templar 
degree puts in the Ritual some of the 
New Testament, but it is a very pervert- 
ed and garbled portion of the New Tes- 
tament, as is true of all rituals of secret 
organizations which take here and there 
a passage of Scripture and adapt it to 
their own purpose. 

The man that went into the Blue 
Lodge with me. the very night of my 
initiation, was an out and out infidel. It 
'is true he admitted that he did believe in 
a Supreme Being, but he was a no- 
torious character in that town ; after- 
wards was separted from his wife for 
beating her ; she sued him for divorce 
and got it without controversy. Do you 
know that the lodges are honeycombed 
with characters — with men whom you 
would not invite into the sanctity of your 
own home, into fellowship with your 
own family? I know main' ministers 
are misled into joining the lod^e on the 



140 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



ground that it will give them an influ- 
ence with the men of the town, and of 
the parish. In my opinion never was a 
greater mistake made. One minister 
that was induced to join the lodge, said 
he very soon found that he was simply 
the advertising- donkey that the lodge 
members used to bring in all the other 
young men of the town on the ground 
that the minister belongs, and if he be- 
longs it must be all right. I want to 
say that if there are any young men here 
to-night that are not members, but are 
thinking of joining lodges — I want to 
say to them, beware of the list of the 
good men that the lodge will present to 
you as members, because my experience 
is that while a great many good men 
have been gotten into the lodge, very 
few follow it up. They are still on the 
list of members, and many of them 
shrink from coming out and throwing 
the whole thing over, but you will sel- 
dom, if ever, find them at the lodge 
meetings, which are carried on princi- 
pally by a set of rounders that just en- 
joy that sort of horse-play that is in- 
volved in the intiation of candidates, 
and in all the boyish frolic and folly that 
often goes with that sort of thing. 

Xow men, Christian men, are afraid 
of the church taking a stand against the 
lodge, oftentimes, because they fear it 
will drive the men out of the church. I 
noticed the other day the statistics of 
the men and religion movement, whereby 
it was said that so far as they have gath- 
ered the statistics, that one-third of our 
congregations today were men and two- 
thirds were women. Now if an out- 
spoken position on secret societies drives 
out the men, then the church in which I 
am working should be pretty well be- 
reft of men, because for the fifty years 
of its existence it has taken that out- 
spoken stand against the secret societies . 
consistently and continuously, from Air. 
Moody and Elder Hitchcock right down 
through the line — not only to-day, but 
always. Mr. Aloody has already been 
mentioned here as an outspoken oppo- 
nent of secrecy and secret societies, and 
yet the facts are that for fifty years the 
Moody church has been one of the 
largest Protestant churches in this city 
of Chicago ; and that it has had by act- 
ual c*unt, not thirty-three and one-third 



per cent men in its congregations, but it 
has averaged fifty per cent men in its 
congregations. 

Now there is an object lesson on the 
influence of having an outspoken and 
bold testimony against the lodge. Our 
last pastor, Dr. A. C. Dixon, has often 
spoken from the platform of the N. C. 
A. conventions, and he has written 
against secret societies, and very fre- 
quently in the pulpit has spoken against 
them, not only in the Moody church but 
in conventions and other places. We con- 
sider him a sane preacher and he is al- 
ways welcome at the Moody church. The 
man who preached to us last Sunday 
morning and evening, is one of your own 
most prominent men. President Blan- 
chard ; and not only that, but we of the 
Moody church find that speaking against 
secrecy is an attraction to young men 
and not a deterrent. 

A couple of years ago we had a young 
man converted on the streets in an open 
air meeting. He was a socialist, almost 
an anarchist, and also a Mason. Soon 
after his conversion he became a mem- 
ber of the Moody church and was taking 
an active part as a Christian worker, 
when a deacon, in one of our testimony 
meetings, happened to speak against se- 
cret societies. This convert came to me 
after the service in a great rage because 
we allowed such a good organization as 
the Masons to be spoken against in our 
church. I talked with him, I loaned 
him some books on the subject, I told 
him in a few weeks the Convention of 
this National Christian Association 
would be held in our church, and I ad- 
vised him to attend its sessions. He 
thought over the matter, prayed over 
the matter, read up on the matter, came 
to the sessions of the National Chris- 
tian Association and was converted and 
gave up his lodge. He left his business 
shortly afterward and went out as a 
preacher. He came into my office this 
past week, after having been pastor of 
three churches in Nebraska, and told me 
that in his churches he had given an out- 
spoken testimony as strong as he knew 
how, against secret societies, with the 
result that, while he had great opposi- 
tion, yet, the men rallied to him, and 
there had been conversions and revivals 
in his churches ; and he had been able to 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



141 



defeat the liquor vote in his town ; and 
had been able to put the one dance hall 
in his town out of business, because all 
the young people were coming to church, 
both young men and young women, and 
the dance hall could not get enough 
young people to carry on the dance. That 
is what an outspoken and brave stand 
for this truth means. 

Again, the Lodge is a false religion. 
Secret societies set up a false religion. 
The religion of works. It varies in the 
different organizations, but you take 
only their public ritual, the ritual of their 
burial service, and while they vary, they 
state in brief this — that if the lodge mem- 
ber follows out the rules of the lodge, is 
a good Mason, or a good Odd Fellow, or 
a good Woodman, or Red Man or Elk or 
Moose or White Rat or whatever he 
happens to be, if he is a good animal, ac- 
cording to the rules, he is promoted to 
the Grand Lodge above, or to the happy 
hunting grounds, or whatever the abode 
of the good White Rats is. Now 
friends that is blasphemy ; that is a re- 
ligion of works. All these secret socie- 
ties leave out the blood of Jesus Christ. 
They leave out the cross of Jesus Christ. 
They leave out our atoning Savior who 
loved us, and came and gave himself for 
us ; and we have it in the Word of God 
that whoever denies Jesus, the Son of 
God, the Savior of sinners, denies God 
the Father, denies our Christian religion. 

Finally. Association. This association 
unites us through that bond which real- 
ly unites. That bond is the Holy Spirit 
himself. You remember the last night 
of Christ's life there in the upper room 
how he prayed that his disciples might 
be one. One with one another, one with 
the Father, one with Himself. "As I 
and my Father are one, that they may 
be one in us." Oh, friends, that is real 
unity. That is unity that goes right 
down through the heart and through the 
soul and through the spirit of men and 
women. That is what has kept the 
Church of Christ, founded by a few 
despised, persecuted people, that is what 
has kept the Church going and growing 
through the centuries. But the secret or- 
ganization that binds men on a false 
basis of perfunctory vows, binds men 
who have nothing in common ; men as 
unlike in spirit and in thought and in 



conviction and in ideals and in con- 
science and in everything else as the 
poles. Any organization that binds by 
an obligation the men of that wideness 
and unlikeness, is counterfeit ; it cannot 
be real ; it is not real ; it never works. 
There is a formal fellowship, there is 
often among a little group a real fellow- 
ship in the secret organization. But there 
can be no real fellowship between the 
Lodge devotee and a saint; and if you, 
Christian young man and Christian 
young woman, become bound up in secret 
organizations with those who are fight- 
ing Christ, with those who are fighting 
all the ideals you hold sacred, with those 
who are perhaps criminals, then vou are 
committing a grave offense against vour- 
self , against your fellow man and against 
your God. 

I once spoke to the Mayor of a city 
about his soul, and asked him to come to 
Christ, and he said, "Oh Masonry is a 
good enough religion for me." I could 
not move him. But afterwards, when 
he had lost his office, and the respect of 
his fellowmen through his immorality 
and scandalous conduct, when he embit- 
tered his own home and destroyed his 
<>\\n usefulness and prospects, I knew 
why Masonry was a good enough re- 
ligion for him. It is a good enough re- 
ligion for a man or a woman who wants 
10 follow self and selfishness and then 
hopes to be promoted to the grand lodge 
above, but it is not a good enough re- 
ligion for any man or woman, who real- 
izes that he is a lost sinner, and needs 
an atoning and a powerful Savior. 

Personal Experience. 

In closing may I give a word of my 
own experience? When God put upon 
my conscience this question of continuing 
a Mason, a secret societv man. and when 
the Spirit of God took the Word of God 
and wrote it in letters that burned on 
my soul : 

"'Be not unequally yoked together with 
unbelievers : for what fellowship hath 
righteousness with unrighteousness ? and 
what communion hath light with dark- 
ness ? 

"And what concord hath Christ with 
Belial ? or what part hath he that be- 
lieveth with an infidel ? 

"Wherefore come ye out from among 



142 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



them and be ye separate, saith the Lord, 
and touch not the unclean thing ; and I 
will receive you. 

"And will be a Father unto you, and 
ye shall be my sons and daughters saith 
the Lord Almighty." 

That looked hard to me. I was then 
in business myself and most of my cus- 
tomers were Masons, fellow Masons. 
Some of my best friends were fellow Ma- 
sons, in the church and outside of it ; and 
it seemed to me that to come out from 
Masonry meant persecution, loss of busi- 
ness and loss of friends ; but I coula not 
get away from that still, small voice, and 
finally one night in great distress, I 
bowed before God and said : ''Lord you 
show me your will in this matter, and 
if it is your will that I come out of se- 
cret societies, I will do it at any cost." 
The next day going down to my busi- 
ness in Boston, from Tremont street 
down toward the post office by the Park- 
er House, I was led to retrace my steps — 
I didn't know why — I came back to Old 
Park Street Church, saw in front of it a 
bulletin of a Convention then in prog- 
ress of this very National Christian As- 
sociation. I hardly knew what it was, 
but saw the names of men like Dr. A. C. 
Dixon and Dr. J. M. Gray and others in 
whom I had confidence, and I went in, 
bought some of the books by Joseph 
Cook and Wendell Phillips and C. G. 
Finney and A. J. Gordon and others. I 
listened to the addresses that evening, 
went home and read those books, and 
God had answered my prayer and shown 
me beyond the peradventure of a doubt 
Thai a Christian man, who wanted to be 
true to God, who wanted to follow the 
will of God, who wanted to be filled 
with and led by the Spirit of God, had 
no business in being unequally yoked to- 
gether with unbelievers, who scoffed at 
the name of Jesus. That night I sat 
down and wrote my withdrawal from 
every organization : Masons and College 
Greek Letter Society, and so on ; and 
friends. It did not take long to find out 
with the peace of God filling my soul, 
that I had done His will. The persecu- 
tion, the loss of business and the loss 
of friends that I dreaded, was simply the 
windmill giants of the devil ; they had no 
real existence. And one of my best cus- 
tomers, a Mason, who was not a Chris- 



tian, and from whom I was trying to get 
at that very time a forty thousand dollar 
order, when he asked me why I had 
given up masonry, and I sat down and 
told him, but his hand on my shoulder 
and said, "Woolley, I think from your 
point of view you did just right," and 
he gave me the order. 

Now I do not say that you, if you 
come out from secret societies, are going 
to escape persecution. Perhaps I would 
have got a still greater blessing if I had 
had persecution, but I do say this : Per- 
secution or no persecution, good conse- 
quences or evil consequences, truth is 
truth; and righteousness is righteous- 
ness ; and following the will of God is 
following the will of God; and God is 
not divided ; He has not got two wills 
for you at one and the same time. You 
cannot go with Him and go with Belial 
at one and the same time. 

God help us men to ring true in 
these days of small things ; in these days 
of ridicule ; in these days when secret 
societies seem to have it all their own 
way in this country ; and hold on, for the 
day will come when the light will shine 
and darkness and all its attendant imps 
will flee awav, through our King, lesus 
Christ. 



TRIBUTE TO JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. 

By William H. Seward. 
In the history of American statesmen, 
none lived a life so long in the public 
service — none had trusts so numerous 
confided to their care — none died a death 
so glorious. Beneath the dome of the 
nation's capitol ; in the midst of the field 
of his highest usefulness, where he had 
won fadeless laurels of renown; equip- 
ped with the armor in which he had 
fought so many battles of truth and free- 
dom, he fell beneath the shaft of the 
king of terrors. And how bright, how 
enviable the reputation he left behind! 
As a man, pure, upright, benevolent, re- 
ligious — his hand unstained by a drop of 
human blood ; uncharged, unsuspected of 
crime, of premeditated wrong, of an im- 
moral' act, of an unchaste word— as : a* 
statesman, lofty and patriotic in all his 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



143 



purposes ; devoted to the interests of the 
people ; sacredly exercising all power 
entrusted to his keeping for the good 
of the public alone, unmindful of per- 
sonal interest and aggrandizement; an 
enthusiastic lover of liberty; a faithful, 
fearless defender of the rights of man! 
The sun of his life in its lengthened 
course through the political heavens, was 
unobscured by a spot, undimmed by a 
cloud ; and when, at the close of the long- 
day, it sank beneath the horizon, the 
whole firmament glowed with the bril- 
liancy of its reflected glories ! Rulers, 
statesmen, legislators ! study and emu- 
late such a life — seek after a character 
so beloved, a death so honorable, a fame 
so immortal. Like him — 

"So live, that when thy summons comes to 

join 
The innumerable caravan, which moves 
To that mysterious realm, where each shall 

take 
His chamber in the silent halls of death, 
Thou go not, like the quarry slave at night. 
Scourged to his dungeon ; but, sustained, and 

soothed 
By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave, 
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch 
About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams." 



Like the author of this tribute, John 
Ouincy Adams was too truly Ameri- 
can not to be . loyally antimasonic. 
One of the ablest of all talented 
writers against the secret evil, he left 
specimens of clear, brilliant exposi- 
tion, scorching invective, and stern 
arraignment, worthy to live forever not 
only as models for the rhetorician, but 
also as exponents of lofty principles, and 
exhibitions of the highest ability in ad- 
vocating them. They stand unrivalled 
among the chief literary monuments of 
the great reform. 



"To be useful in the world needs prep- 
aration. Everything really useful must 
be shaped to fit some place or task. 
Youth is the time to follow the advice 
of the old Persian proverb, 'Square thy- 
self for use; a stone that may fit in the 
wall is not left in the road.' ' 



"THE IMPUDENCE OF SATAN." 

By Rev. J. R. Millix. 

Two or three years ago, Oklahoma 
City, at a cost of more than half a mil- 
lion dollars, adorned and honored itself 
with a magnificent high school build- 
ing of white marble. So far, good. 

Passing by the north end of the build- 
ing, one might suppose that the building 
is a Masonic Temple, for the symbols of 
Freemasonry are carved on the corner- 
stone of black marble high in the wall. 
Masonic symbols on a civic institution! 
Why? Why? Why? 

This case is not exceptional. Ever 
and anon one reads in the papers an an- 
nouncement like this — The cornerstone 
of the new school building or high school 
building at A or B or C was laid today 
with impressive ceremonies by the Free- 
masons. Such an incident is so common 
that it is taken as a matter of course and 
goes without comment. Masonic sym- 
bols on a civic institution ! Why? Who 
can tell why? 

A few years ago a splendid court- 
house was built in the city of Lawrence, 
Kan. Against a just and forceful and 
timely protest the Freemasons laid the 
cornerstone of the Temple of Justice and 
cut their lodge symbols on it. Nor is 
this an isolated case. Other communi- 
ties besides Lawrence, Kan., have suf- 
fered a like indignity. Masonic symbols 
on a civic institution ! Why ? Who 
knows why? Masonic symbols on a 
courthouse ! Surely every stone in the 
Temple of Justice cries out against such 
injustice and insult to the citizenship of 
the community. Masonic symbols on a 
civic institution! Yes, the spectacle dis- 
plays "the impudence of Satan." How 
account for such gross and reckless im- 
propriety? How can such insolence and 
arrogance be explained? By what pro- 
cess of crow r d psychology does such a 
crude case of butting in become possi- 
ble? 

We shall be told, of course, that the 
Freemasons were "invited" to lay the 
cornerstone of the schoolhouse, or the 
courthouse. Yes ! But people are "in- 
vited" to do all sorts of abominable 
things. Jesus was "invited" to worship 
Satan ! And again, the Freemasons are 
''invited" to lay the cornerstone of the 
schoolhouse or the courthouse, in every 



144 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



instance, doubtless., by civic officials who 
are themselves Freemasons and who be- 
tray their trust as civic officials in giving 
an invitation to the Freemasons. Civic 
officials are elected as civic officials by 
the citizens as citizens. Civic officials 
are elected as servants of the people and 
as "ministers of God" (Rom. 13:1-6). 
not to coddle Freemasonry. Civic offi- 
cials who betray their trust by inviting 
the Freemasons to lay the cornerstone 
of any civic institution ought to be com- 
pelled' to resign. And the Freemasons 
ought to say, "Amen." But instead of 
resenting the invitation to such an in- 
congruous performance, the Freemasons 
accept the spurious invitation with 
thanks. And every free and honest 
citizen, if he allows himself to be pres- 
ent, looks at the fool performance with 
wonder and disgust and righteous an- 
ger. 

What a cry of indignant protest there 
would be if any other class or clan, polit- 
ical or religious or otherwise, should ar- 
rogate to itself the laying of the corner- 
stone of a civic institution ! And the 
Freemasons would probably be the loud- 
est in the bunch. 

As night the day, or day the night, so 
conclusion follows premise. Hear it. 
Freemasonry smites its members with 
moral blindness. Freemasonry produces 
impossible people. Men, otherwise fair 
and honorable, become impossible as 
Freemasons. And Satan laughs, "Ha, 
ha!" 

Hear? Hear? "Wherefore come out 
from among them, and be ye separate." 
( 2 Cor. 6:14-18.) 



'JINER" TELLS EXPERIENCES. 



Secret Society Editor Recalls Some of His 
"Goat-Riding" Stunts. 



"A man's future is his own. He 
makes it every day as he goes along. 
As a keen thinker says, 'What a man 
chooses today he chooses for tomorrow ; 
what he overcomes today he is overcom- 
ing for tomorrow ; what he yields to to- 
day, he is still more likely to yield to to- 
morrow.' ' 



"We all wish to be loved. W T e may 
not confess it, but it is true, and it is 
nothing to be ashamed of. Well, then, 
let us be worthy of being loved, and let 
us love. This is the secret of winning 
souls into the Kingdom." 



"For years and years every art and 
wile of woman the world over has been 
used in an endeavor to pry from the lips 
of husband, brother or sweetheart, 
through just what ordeals he is required 
to pass before he is entrusted with the 
secrets of the various secret societies. 

"While some of them think they have 
succeeded, in truth they haven't, for did 
the inquisitive members of the fair sex 
realize the terrible punishment often- 
times they endeavor to bring down upon 
the heads of those whom they ply 
with queries along this line, they would 
desist forthwith. 

Without dealing with specific in- 
stances, by which I mean identifying the 
various orders' forms of initiation, I will 
relate a few things that, perhaps, will 
furnish Y. B. C. with ideas upon which 
he can base the initiation forms for the 
club he refers to, provided he cares to. 

"I remember one dark, stormy night, 
I was bound for a lodge to take my first 
step toward becoming a full-fledged 
member thereof, when I was set upon 
by a crowd of thttgs, at least I thought 
them such to be, and was bound, gagged 
and blindfolded a short distance from the 
lodge's meeting place. I was loaded into 
a wagon and driven rapidly for miles, it 
seemed to me, then taken to an under- 
taking establishment, placed in a coffin 
and thrown back into the wagon again. 
I was helpless, and all I could do was to 
think, and I was doing that most strenu- 
ously — all my past life came up for re- 
view, for I thought it was all up with 
me. My conviction along this line was 
strengthened amazingly when I was tak- 
en from the wagon and carried into what 
seemed to be a church, for I could hear 
the strains of the dead march as the 
bearers of the coffin enclosing me pro- 
ceeded slowly into the edifice. 

"The coffin finally was placed some- 
where, apparently in front of the pulpit, 
and the choir — the most mournful I ever 
heard before or since — struck up a sad 
hymn. A sermon followed, in which 
some good deeds of which I had never 
suspected myself of doing were enlarged 



September. 1912. 



HRISTIAX CYNOSURE. 



:4 r 



upon. It was pointed out with emphasis 
by the speaker that, nevertheless, they 
didn't offset the one great offense — 
whatever it was the speaker didn't spe- 
cify — and that it grieved him very much 
that one so young and with so much 
before him to all appearances should be 
stricken down in his prime and buried 
alive. But to go any further might be 
revealing too much, and even now I may 
have overstepped the bounds, so I pass 
on. Another time I have a keen recol- 
lection of treading upon a redhot stove — 
at least I was so told — and at the time 
felt quite certain I was doing that very 
thing and that. too. in my bare feet. 
Since, however, I've discovered that I 
was simply treading upon a cake of ice, 
into which hot pokers were being forced 
at a perfectly safe distance from my tril- 
bys. producing the noise of frying meat. 

''Sliding down a slippery plank, first 
falling into a tub of uncomfortably 
warm water and next into an ice cold 
one and .finally into a big barrel of flour. 
still lingers in my memory. 

"But I could go on indefinitely — no 
two orders treat incoming members the 
same way. but how they do in each there 
is only one way to discover — join, and 
then, like mine, your lips will be sealed 
against improper disclosures. Once a 
member of an order V. B. C. should have 
no difficulty whatever in getting up any 
sort of an initiation form. 

"In my vast experience I have discov- 
ered initiations are divided into two 
great classes — the sublime and the ridic- 
ulous, to a greater or lesser degree, al- 
though some forms partake of both." — 
The Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph. 



labor union, and in every case rejected 
by the company. Under pressure of pub- 
lic opinion, the strike was promptly set- 
tled by direct negotiations between com- 
pany and men. — The Congregationalist. 



THE TEST OF CHOICE. 

Much has been said about organized 
labor's distrust of the church and the 
ministry. The church has been bitterly 
criticised because of alleged subservi- 
ency to capital. An incident in a re- 
cent street railway strike in Detroit. 
Mich., revealed a very different situation. 
In an attempt to submit the differences 
between company and men to arbitra- 
tion, the names of four prominent 
clergymen, a Congregational minister, an 
Episcopal bishop, a Catholic priest and a 
Jewish rabbi, were proposed. In every 
case these names were proposed by the 



ITALY DEFIES THE POPE. 

Italy has challenged the world'.- ad- 
miration by its conviction and sentence 
of the accused (and no doubt guilty » 
Camorrists. Italy did something more 
than convict these men and sentence 
them to punishment. It once more prov- 
ed that the pope's word is not law as far 
as the prosecuting arm of the Italian 
government is concerned. 

It was while the trial of the Camor- 
rists was being conducted that the pope 
promulgated his famous decree that no 
accusation or prosecution of any Roman 
Catholic clergyman shall take place 
without the consent of the Roman Cath- 
olic church authorities. 

Among the Camorrists on trial was a 
priest, named Vitozzi. Some editors 
have insinuated that it was just espe- 
cially to save him that the pope was "in- 
spired" to pronounce his "ex cathedra" 
decree concerning to-be-prosecuted Ro- 
man Catholic clergymen. 

Be that as it may. the court has in- 
cluded the priest in its conviction and 
sentence. Yitozzi was found guilty ; and 
his sentence is not a light one. compris- 
ing seven years of imprisonment and 
two years surveillance after that. 

If the pope's rule will not work in 
Italy, where will it work Perhaps it 
is Italy's evident unwillingness longer to 
be in any way subject to his dictation 
which has led some of his admirers to 
suggest that the seat of his power should 
be removed to America. But what would 
the old gentleman do in America, where, 
even making allowance for the truckling 
of seekers after political support, he 
would be accorded ten times less rev- 
erence than he receives at Italy's hands ? 
— Lutheran Standard. 



"To take short views is a wonderful 
help in hard crises. 'Anvone can carry 
his burden, however heavy, till night- 
fall. Anyone can do his work, however 
hard, for one day. Anyone can live 
sweetly, patiently, till the sun goes down 
— and this is all that life ever reallv 
mean-.' " 



146 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



fttotortal. 



THE CAMORRA SENTENCE. 

It is possible to hope that the wreck 
of the Camorra secret society removes, 
or at least lessens, the shadow of the 
dreaded Black Hand. The trial, which 
began in March, 1910, and ended in 
July, 191 2, has outlasted the lives of 
some of the prisoners in the great cage. 
At the end, one prisoner who tried to 
commit suicide, introduced a feature 
hardly less dramatic and hardly more 
surprising to an American eye than 
scenes that had already been enacted by 
the shrieking prisoners in the strange 
trial. Evidently Italian court practice 
differs from our own in matters of li- 
cence and decorum, with the advantage 
apparently on our side ; in efficiency and 
attainment of inevitable conclusion, the 
advantage may lie on the Italian side. 
Capital punishment having been abolish- 
ed in Italy, none of the convicted as- 
sassins can be executed, but eight of the 
multitude of surviving prisoners have 
been sentenced to thirty years of impris- 
onment and ten of police surveillance. 
Others were given lesser sentences, in- 
cluding the priest, Vitozzi, who furnish- 
ed the "founded on the Bible" type of 
demonstration from time to time. At 
the time of hearing the verdict and the 
sentence he knelt weeping and praying, 
others screamed like maniacs, and one 
cut his own throat. It is claimed that 
the secret society in question was prac- 
tically annihilated by the collection of the 
prisoners into the cage and that the or- 
der is destroyed by the crushing result 
of this trial. 



LOST IN THE WOODS. 

The Modern Woodmen of America 
have been apt to offer desired patrons 
almost incredible promises, but this year 
their Head Council has issued to al- 
ready secured patrons a letter of warn- 
ing. It threatens Camps with annul- 
ment of charter, and individual members 
with cancellation of insurance, if they 
attempt organized resistance to the in- 
crease of price. Unless ceasing to claim 
benefits they leave this piece of woods, 
they must pay taxes at a higher rate than 



was named when inducements were of- 
fered and promises were trusted. 

Additional cost was decreed at a ses- 
sion held here in Chicago by the board 
of directors and the . executive council. 
Submit or forfeit, is the stern alterna- 
tive. To be sure, the managers prob- 
ably felt compelled to make some change 
of either rate or benefit, because, if they 
did not, the benefit would automatically 
change itself. Neither Oak nor Ever- 
green can shade promises that affect the 
inevitable relation between outgo and in- 
come ; not what agents promise or im- 
agine, but the necessary and inherent 
factors of a mathematical problem must 
be reckoned with as fixing the unavoid- 
able outcome. For this unanswerable 
reason, it is better to follow plain finan- 
cial paths already well measured and 
surveyed, than to wander dreamily in 
untracked fraternal woods. 



GUARDIANS OF LIBERTY. 

We have been asked whether the 
"Guardians of Liberty" is to be classed 
with secret societies, and in opposition 
to the Holy Scriptures. We do not con- 
sider it a secret society. There are "no 
religious ceremonies, no ritual, no chap- 
lain is elected, and there is no altar." 
They do not require one to take a se- 
cret obligation, but they have an open 
declaration of principles. 

We wish to thank our friends for their 
prompt and liberal response to our in- 
quiry last month concerning this asso- 
ciation. 



A LABOR UNION'S HONOR. 

By a unanimous vote the International 
Typographical Union convention at 
Cleveland indorses the stand of its own 
officers and those of the Stereotypers 
and Electrotypers' union in refusing to 
approve the "walk-out" in the Chicago 
newspaper plants this summer. There 
is thus presented the remarkable and 
reassuring spectacle of one of the most 
honorable and powerful of the labor 
unions of the country putting the stamp 
of approval upon the action of the em- 
ployers with whom its men work. 

For the committee report points out 
in unfaltering terms the unwisdom and 
injustice of the strikers' disregard of 
their arbitration contract. It declares 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



147 



"without hesitation that the men tried to 
get arbitration "predicated on conditions 
laid down by themselves'' instead of 
sticking to their agreement. It adds that 
had they kept that agreement there is no 
reason to doubt that they would have 
received a fair adjudication of their case 
from their employers. 

A report like this backed by the unan- 
imous indorsement of a great interna- 
tional convention of union men is pro- 
foundly significant. It shows to the hot- 
heads of unionism, the men who think 
their given word is not worth the trou- 
ble of keeping, that they do not repre- 
sent the real conscience or conviction of 
the labor movement. It proves the jus- 
tice of the stand taken by the newspa- 
per publishers of Chicago. And it re-es- 
tablishes and strengthens for the future 
the foundation for real and mutually fair 
agreement between employer and em- 
ploye. — Editorial of Aug. lytJi in Chi- 
cago Evening Post. 

UNIVERSITY LIFE ARRAIGNED. 

An arraignment of American univer- 
sity life, made by Chancellor Samuel 
Avery, of the University of Nebraska, 
when the National Education Associa- 
tion met in Chicago, is at once severe and 
startling. It recalls the remark of a 
New Haven minister's wife, that she 
would rather send a son to hell than to 
Yale. Extravagant idlers able to afford 
to spend their winters in fashionable 
universities, regard institutions of learn- 
ing and culture as attractive winter re- 
sorts, and in the multitude of such al- 
most nominal students the chancellor ap- 
pears to find a burden which the college 
must unnaturally bear. "A student now- 
adays must be very brilliant or very 
troublesome before the college president 
becomes acquainted with him at all," 
said Chancellor Avery. "The enormous 
influx of students has changed the char- 
acter of the student body. Every col- 
lege president knows, and if he is frank, 
will admit that there is some truth in the 
strictures of the late R. T. Crane. 

"The story widely circulated and com- 
monly believed that in the destruction 
by fire of a fraternity house at one in- 
stitution the students lost their lives be- 
cause they were too intoxicated to es- 
cape and the other story of the drunken 
student who blundered into the wrong 



apartment and was shot as a burglar, are 
sufficiently well known to make every 
college president wonder if these things 
are not present in his own institution." 

The educational system has never been 
perfect, and it is easy to compare old 
schools and colleges with new to the dis- 
paragement of either. Some balancing 
losses may have offset some other gains. 
A log with a boy on one end and Mark 
Hopkins on the other, was in the judg- 
ment of President Garfield a pretty good 
college, and there can be no doubt that 
there were advantages on the side of the 
small colleges. Denominational institu- 
tions may have often offered better pros- 
pects of developed character than state 
universities can always hold out, even 
though they enjoy state patronage as 
agencies expected to provide the state 
with good or well trained citizens. 

Undue parental anxiety should not be 
ruthlessly stimulated by needless muck- 
raking; temptations are not monopol- 
ized by college ; life with its duties and 
its chances is everywhere, and love will 
seek by prayer the protection of the 
Father in Heaven for any child away 
from home ; but an educational institu- 
tion is disappointing in peculiar degree 
if it fails of being duly parental in any 
degree. It is a fair question whether 
any college that favors the existing se- 
cret club system is providing a reason- 
ably safe four years' home. Character 
and scholarship should retain precedence 
of athletics and societies. Moreover, 
open societies are free from objections 
which haunt secret halls and may well 
enjoy the preference of faculties and 
trustees. Let it be granted that clean- 
ing and sifting will make a college 
smaller ; there are advantages in small 
colleges and mere size is not so valuable 
that no price is too dear to be paid. 

Stevenson speaks of "the great task of 
happiness." But happiness is not a task. 
It is not even an occupation. It is a 
quality of life. Happiness depends on 
helpfulness. That's the reason joy is 
social. Helpfulness keeps happiness be- 
cause it adds to the area of affection. 
People are not happy when they seek- 
after happiness. They become steeped 
in happiness when they undertake to 
promote the joy of others. — J J 'alter Wil- 
liams. 



14? 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September. 1912. 



THE REAL KRISHNA. 

The Holi festival has been celebrated 
as usual, and the observance has been of 
the usual abominable nature. Once more 
throughout vast districts immense multi- 
tudes of men, women, and children 
abandoned themselves to appalling de- 
bauchery in the name of religion. During 
the festival one day is devoted to the 
flinging of mud and cow manure at each 
other, and another day is spent in squirt- 
ing red and green fluids over the clothes 
of others, while drinking and carousing 
go on as accompaniments. Children im- 
itate their elders in the use of shockingly 
indecent language. Idols are taken from 
temples and surrounded by dancing 
mobs, whose dances are wild and ob- 
scene. The whole festival is in honor of 
the god Krishna, who has of late been 
accepted by certain dilettante cliques in 
Western lands as a fountain of ancient 
wisdom, the Bhagavad Gita being in 
such circles preferred to the Bible. 
Neither the Swamis nor Mrs. Besant 
seem disposed to refer to the stories of 
Krishna and his 1,600 wives, nor to the 
shameful immorality of those who in 
India are devoted to the service of this 
god. nor to the ruin of the lives of wo- 
men in his name. — Homiletic Review. 

Yet is not Annie Besant a very high 
priestess of Freemasonry in dark East 
India, the land of Brahma, Vishnu and 
Siva? Krishna is identified with Vishnu. 
Masonic tradition credits the introduc- 
tion of the Mysteries or secret order into 
India to Brahma. The Veda recognizes 
the three steps of the sun. The Masonic 
worship of the sun flourishes in India. 
A writer in The Theosophic Messenger 
says : "I belong to Universal Co-Ma- 
sonry * * * One of the vice presi- 
dent's of this order is Mrs. Annie Besant. 

* * * Here is her designation : "The 
very illustrious Vice President ; Grand 
Master S. Annie Besant, 33d degree, P. 
M. ; Hon. R. W. M. 'Human Duty Lodge/ 
Xo. 6 (London) Member of the Su- 
preme Council : Gr. Ins. Gen. for Britain 
and the British Dependencies.' * * * 
In India there are already seven lodges. 

* * * The last one, 'The Rising Sun 
of India Lodge,' has the good fortune of 
having the Very Illustrious Sister, Annie 
Besant. as its R. W. M." 

Another article in the same Theosophic 



magazine considers the case of "Theoso- 
phy and Masons." The writer declares 
that "Fortunate is the Freemason who is 
also conversant with Theosophy, for he 
is provided with the means of gaining an 
insight into the workings of his craft 
which nothing else can supply." In fact, 
as one turns the pages of the magazine 
he is half tempted to wonder whether it 
is chiefly an advocate of Theosophy or 
of Masonry. We are almost as mixed 
in our ideas as Tommy Atkins in Kip- 
ling's "Mother Lodge." which the same 
publication contains. 

"An' man on man got talkin 
Religion an' the rest. 
An' every man comparin' 
Of the god 'e knew the best. 

* >|c :|: :■: V :> ^c 

We'd say 'twas 'ighly curious, 
An' we'd all ride 'ome to bed 
With Mohammed, God, and Shiva 
Changin' pickets in our 'ead." 



"Charity begins at home and often 
ruins its health by staying there too 
much." 



OBITUARY. 

Rev. J. S. Baxter died June 17, 1912, 
at his home, 414 West Seventh street, 
Oklahoma City, Okla., aged 43 years. 

He was born in Ohio, but his parents 
moved to Iowa when he was quite young. 
He was converted in his young man- 
hood. In the year 1895 he was married 
to Miss Ada Rinard at Cory don, Iowa. 
He was ordained a Baptist minister in 
1897. at Leon. Iowa, where he was pas- 
tor about eighteen months. His other 
pastorates in Iowa were Harvard, Sib- 
ley. Riverton, Peoria and Afton. He 
moved in the fall of 1910 to Oklahoma 
City, where he and his wife have lived 
since. 

His widow and four children, Orville 
Shelton. Martha Marguerite, Paul Gor- 
don and Frank Alford Judson, survive 
him. 

He died of valvular heart trouble, 
after a brief illness. He had won his 
way into the hearts of many Oklahoma 
friends by his consistent godly life. He 
rests from his labors and his works do 
follow him. The funeral was conduct- 
ed at his home by Rev. J. B. Rounds, 
pastor of the Trinity Baptist church. 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



149 



assisted by Rev. J. R. Millen, pastor of 
the United Presbyterian church. 
"With heavenly weapons he has fought 

The battles of the Lord, 
Finished his course, and kept the faith, 

And gained the great reward.'' 



Hero* of ®ur Porfi. 

Get the booklet called, "The Condem- 
nation of All Secret Societies !" It puts 
the lodge proposition into a nutshell, and 
gives the reader some points of argu- 
ment that no lodge man can overthrow. 
It is just what every antisecrecy man 
needs. It will cost you only ten cents. 
Address Rev. L. V. Harrell, South 
Haven, Mich. 



Wheaton, 111., March 18, 1912. 
Rev. L. V. Harrell, South Haven, Mich. 

My Dear Brother : . Thank you for 
the copy of your little booklet, which 
came duly to hand. I am sure that God 
will use it to accomplish great good, and 
I am glad He stirred you up to offer this 
testimony to the honor of His Son, Jesus 
Christ, and for the saving of precious 
souls of men. 

I shall always be glad to know of your 
prosperity. 

With best regards, I am 

Fraternally yours, 
Charles A. Blaxchard. 



MINUTES OHIO CONVENTION. 

The Ohio Convention of the National 
Christian Association for 19 12 was 
opened in the Zion Mennonite church of 
Bluffton. Ohio, at 7 :3c July 29. After 
a song the devotional service was con- 
ducted by Rev. J. M. Faris, of Belle- 
fontaine. 
- In the cordial welcome extended by 
the pastor. Rev. J. B. Brunk, reference 
was made to the fact that all sought hap- 
piness. Any organization that brought 
about a better condition of things, 
brought happiness. The association was 
welcomed into the church, the homes 
and hearts of the people. 

President, Rev. W. S. Gottshall, in a 
happy response joined in the thoughts 
presented, gave reasons for our coming 



together and hoped that much good 
might result from the work undertaken. 

After the appointment of committees 
by the president, Rev. Dr. William Dil- 
lon, of Huntington, Ind., showed the 
condemnation of God's Word to all se- 
cret lodges. He especially spoke of two 
organized lodges referred to in the Bible, 
the Adonis, the account of which was 
found in the eighth chapter of Ezekiel, 
and the Eleusinian mysteries referred to 
in the fifth chapter of Ephesians. 

The concluding prayer was offered by 
Rev. S. P. Overholtz, of Lima. 
Tuesday's Sessions. 

The Tuesday morning session was 
opened by Scripture reading and prayer, 
led by Rev. Thomas Meyer, of Lima. In 
his comments he said, "Many things are 
done behind barred doors and screened 
windows. The light is shut out. It is 
the work of Jesus Christ to have the 
light penetrate these dark places." 

Men were then appointed to report 
the proceedings of the meetings for pub- 
lication in the various church papers. 

Letters of sympathy and good wishes 
were received from a number that could 
not be at the convention and were read 
by Rev. W. B. Stoddard. 

After the reports of the committees a 
motion was made and carried as follows : 

That a committee consisting of the 
president, secretary and treasurer be ap- 
pointed and given power to use the 
funds in the state treasury in prosecution 
of work in the state. 

Rev. R. Hargrave, of Xorthwood, 
gave a very instructive address on the 
"Unfruitful Works of Darkness." The 
following were a few salient points 
made: 1. The attitude of the Christian 
towards institutions of secrecy is that of 
separation. 2. Secret society men have 
a wrong conception of God's character. 
How can they know God the Father 
when they reject Christ, who came to 
reveal the Father? 3. The workings of 
lodges are not in harmony with the prin- 
ciples of Christianity. Men who have 
wrong conceptions of God have also 
wrong views of life. They have wrong 
views of their relation to men. Their 
motives in philanthropy are selfish. The 
light which they claim to have is kept 
under a bushel. 4. The lodge has no 
good fruitage. Fruit that grows in dark- 



150 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



ness is not good. The lodge says, "If 
you submit to the rules of the lodge you 
will be admitted to the Grand Lodge 
above." They make works the condi- 
tion for admittance to the "Grand 
Lodge." 

Rev. Albert Schumacher, of Pandora, 
O., made an effective "contrast." He 
contrasted two banners which he saw 
displayed in one of our Ohio cities. 

i st. The banner with an eagle and 
the letters F. O. E. which spell foe. 
The lodge of Eagle's banner was dis- 
played mostlv before saloons and houses 
of infamy and vice. 

2nd. The banner of the great Sun- 
day School Army with the figure of the 
"Cross" and motto, "By this sign we 
conquer," was displayed before churches, 
business houses and homes of Christian 
people. From the standpoint of ethics 
lodges cannot stand. They exclude all 
who cannot pay and are physically dis- 
abled. They are' detrimental to home and 
church. 

The meeting adjourned for the noon 
hour. Plenty of food was provided for 
and placed on a long table in the shade 
of trees. No one needed to remain hun- 
gry. The sisters of the Zion Church and 
others also, are to be commended for 
their bountiful provision and hospitality. 

After the physical and social refresh- 
ment the afternoon session was opened 
by Scripture reading and prayer, led by 
Rev. Jno. Blosser, of Rawson, O. He 
showed the relation of Christ and the 
Church as illustrated by the relation be- 
tween husband and wife. This close 
relation between Christians and Christ 
does not permit affiliation with lodges. 

An address on "The Church of Jesus 
Christ Our All Sufficiency" was given by 
Elder A. B. Horst, of Bellefontaine, O. 
He made reference to man's invented 
ways for gaining salvation as very poor 
substitutes for the plan of God. The 
lodges are an imitation of the Church of 
God, therefore draw men from Christ. 
The privileges of song, fellowship, bur- 
den-bearing and helpfulness are all 
f6und in the Church ; therefore, the 
lodge is useless. The Church of Christ 
offers a full salvation, which is all we 
need. 



Another collection was taken, after 
which a chart talk was given by Rev. 
W. B. Stoddard, so full of inspiration 
and revelation that one scarcely knows 
what to mention in a brief report. He 
ably showed the foolishness of the lodge 
system. He convinced us of his thor- 
ough acquaintance with it. He revealed 
in detail the steps taken in initiating new 
members. 

A ringing testimony was given by a 
brother Watson, of Lima. 

After the adoption of resolutions the 
meeting adjourned to meet for the clos- 
ing session in the Ebenezer Mennonite 
church. Even though a storm came up 
at the time of meeting, the large house 
was perhaps half filled. The main fea- 
ture of the evening's program was an ad- 
dress by Rev. Simon Peter Long, of 
Mansfield. Subject: "The Enemy to 
the Throne." Since this able address 
will doubtless appear in the Cynosure 
a few thoughts will suffice. 

i. We know there is a personal devil 
by his tracks in all parts of the world. 
2. The fact of evil proves the existence 
of an evil Being. 3. This evil Being is 
back of all so-called religious ceremonies 
practiced by lodges. 4. This enemy of 
the throne associates the good with the 
evil, the holy with the unholy. 5. This 
enemy works against God, our Father, 
His Son, and His children. He sepa- 
rates families and enslaves men and 
women in the lodges. 

The spirit and interest of the meeting 
throughout was commendable. 

A goodly number expressed them- 
selves as not having known before the 
evils existing in the Lodge. Doubtless 
many shall be protected from its snares. 
May God add His blessing to this con- 
vention. 

J. B. Brunk, Secretary. 



STODDARD IN OHIO. 

Washington, D. C, Aug. 12, 1912. 
Dear Cynosure: 

Another month has passed, and I am 
again expected to report. I must tell 
you of our Mid-Summer Convention, 
which came to our Ohio friends with op- 
portunity and blessing. Some think that 
amid the summer heat, and harvesting, 
it is useless to ask the farmer folk to 
gather for the consideration of such 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



151 



truths as the X. C. A. workers bring. 
That they appreciate our efforts to bring 
needed truth, and are willing to sacrifice 
that they may obtain it has again been 
demonstrated. 

Our convention, near Bluffton, was 
the result of a kindly, united effort. 
There was a general willingness to help, 
each contributing his or her part. 
Though compelled to leave quite sud- 
denly at the close I heard many expres- 
sions of approval. God's blessing was 
upon our meeting. Through the set ad- 
dresses, and the general discussions, 
there came truths to receptive minds 
never to be forgotten. In a time like 
ours, when so many forces of darkness 
are blighting, and destroying, what a 
privilege to be a co-worker with Christ 
in helping our f ellowmen ! 

The varied parts of our convention 
were well sustained. The speakers were 
on hand : the money needed was sup- 
plied, and our entertainment was very 
good, even luxurious. Indeed, when con- 
sidering such delightful occasions with 
such delightful people the exclamation 
naturally comes, "Oh, why won't every- 
body be good, and enjoy what goodness 
always brings?" Long travels through 
smoke, heat and dust extended over days 
and nights are forgotten in the remem- 
brance of blessings received. 

The letters to this convention were 
not as many as they should have been. 
Some got the blessing of the helper in 
that line, others missed it. Several meet- 
ings were held as usual during the prep- 
aration. West Liberty did splendidly as 
usual. Meetings held at the Oak and 
Walnut Grove Mennonite churches 
found on either side of the town gave 
opportunity to reach the hundreds who 
came. .There was a noticeable increase 
in the contributions and in the number 
of Cvxosure subscriptions taken. The 
death of two, who had been kind the 
year before brought a sadness, but so it 
is, God takes, and gives others who are 
to stand in their places. 

One Sabbath was given the meetings 
in the M. E. church of Lockport and the 
Fairview Brethren County church, near 
Beaverdam. The former service was not 
well attended, because of a storm, but 
the Brethren church was well filled with 
attentive listeners. About one hundred 



and rift)- gathered one week evening in 
the Pike Mennonite church near Elida, 
some coming from the thra>hing ma- 
chine and others from harvest fields. 
Meetings in Mennonite churches in Pan- 
dora and Bluffton were largely attended. 
An organizer of Modern Woodmen 
lodges was getting in hi- persuasions to 
willing ears at Rawson. His song was 
the great opportunity hi- society was af- 
fording for men to properly and cheaply 
care for their loved ones. Those who do 
not stop to calculate, will of course be 
added to the mourners left by similar 
organizations. I was permitted to give 
warning to some who did not seem glad 
to hear. The organizer was not a pro- 
fessor of Christianity, and charged that 
the reason I (a minister > was opposed to 
his' lodge was because I wanted their 
money in my church. The unwise 
laughed, evidently thinking he had made 
a great point. 

You will have in the minutes the rec- 
ord of the convention. I feel the embar- 
rassment of not being able to mention 
the names of the many who contributed 
toward the aid of the work. Friends will 
understand, I am sure. Our work in 
Ohio has received a good uplift. In our 
outgoing and incoming Ohio State Pres- 
idents we have strong, efficient men, able 
to oversee the work in their care. 

In our political and social national life 
no man knows what is ahead. God 
knows. Let us trust Him to uncover the 
hidden things of dishonest}'. Yours in 
the conflict. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



AGENT DAVIDSON'S REPORT. 
Monroe. La., August 13. 1912. 
Dear Cynosure : 

I am on the tiring line pouring hot 
shot (the Word of God) into the ene- 
my's camp. 1 have been unusually busy 
since my last letter to you. I have vis- 
ited two district Sunday School conven- 
tions, and conducted a Ministers' and 
Deacons' Institute. The first convention 
of the Eighth District Baptist Sunday 
School was held at Lamothe, La., where 
I preached one sermon, delivered one lec- 
ture, served on several important com- 
mittees, secured a number i^i Cynosure 
subscriptions, and distributed tracts and 
made some converts to our cause. 



15. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



I next attended the annual session of 
the Educational Eighth District Sunday 
School Convention at Palestine church, 
Alexandria. Here I also conducted the 
Ministers' and Deacons' Institute at Shi- 
loh church. I am now on my way to the 
Tenth District Baptist Association at 
Delhi, La., and will go from there to 
Yicksburg, Greenville, and other points 
in Mississippi. 

I received the tracts and am using 
them to the best advantage. The Secret 
Empire is not openly opposing my work 
in Alexandria, as they did a few months 
ago: in fact, some of the more intelli- 
gent and conservative among the leaders 
are beginning to see and acknowledge 
that I am not the forked-tongued, hideous 
monster which some of their number 
pointed me out to be, but rather that I 
am contending for a principle of right- 
eousness. Indeed, a few openly ac- 
knowledged the justness of my conten- 
tion. Nevertheless, there is still a secret 
undercurrent quietly at work among 
some of my members to disturb the 
peace that has existed and still exists 
between myself as pastor and the Shiloh 
Baptist church of Alexandria. God has 
Wonderfully blessed my pastoral labors. 
I celebrated my first anniversary last 
Sunday, August 1.1, and my report 
showed an increase in membership of 
forty-eight, and I baptized two on Sun- 
day, making fifty. It also showed im- 
provements made to the extent of more 
than three hundred dollars. 

Monroe, as of yore, is sorely afflicted 
with secret lodges of almost every de- 
scription. As in other places, they are 
sapping the very life, spiritual and finan- 
cial, out of the Church, and leading the 
people farther and farther into idola- 
trous worship and away from God. The 
churches, without a single exception, are 
suffering, while the lodges are flourish- 
ing. 

Crops between this city and Columbia, 
along the fertile Oauchita river valley, 
are very poor, foreshadowing an unusu- 
ally hard winter. The lodges are mak- 
ing hay while the sun shines, and laying 
up in store so they can continue their 
work, deceiving the ignorant masses, and 
fastening them down with terrible oaths. 

I am to preach here tonight at the 
First Baptist church. Rev. C. B. Collins, 



the pastor, is an ardent out and out anti- 
secretist. I have planted some Cyno- 
sure seed here, which will bring forth 
fruit to the glory and honor of God. 
Pray for my continued success, and the 
final triumph of truth among the masses 
of my poor, deluded race. 

Those desiring to correspond with me, 
write to my home address, 1732 West 
Elliott street, Alexandria, La. 

Yours for righteousness, 

F. J. Davidson. 



"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Dyersburg, Tenn., August 2, 191 2. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother Phillips: I have just 
come in from Newburn, Tenn., where I 
have been distributing tracts, and lec- 
turing to the people against their idol 
worship. I had a chance to talk to more 
than three hundred people every evening 
for a week. We had a mixed congrega- 
tion every night, both black and white 
people attending our meetings. 

I said to them among other things : 
"Israel is an empty vine" (Hosea 10:1). 
I reminded them of the many altars 
they had even in Newbern. Six differ- 
ent lodges met in one hall. I said : "I 
see that the lodges have killed all the 
churches in this place. Men, women and 
children all belong to the Lodge." 

One man said to me after the service, 
"Yes, you are right. The churches are 
all dead here. They don't do anything 
for their sick, and we always take care 
of our sick people." I said to him, 
"Brother, you are a part of the Church, 
and Christ Jesus gave Himself for it. 
Do you think you can belong to these 
societies and please God while walking 
with sinners?" He said, "Well, you are 
right, still I belong to several lodges and 
am a Christian. When I went into them 
I did not know they were against the 
Church, but since then I see that the peo- 
ple are slothful and don't care for the 
Church." I said, "Well, what are you 
going to do? Are you going to remain 
in them when you see that it is against 
the Church?" He said, "I have spent 
so much money in them that I hate to 
give them up." I said, " Poor thing, I 
am sorry for you!" He asked, "Why?" 
and I answered, "Well, you know that it 
is wrong, and you will be lost if you per- 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



153 



sist in your sin." Then he said, "I want 
to leave my wife and children something 
when I die." His wife said, "Sister Rob- 
erson, I would rather beg bread if he 
dies before I do, than to have that policy, 
and my husband in Hell on account of 
it. I don't know when anyone has been 
converted. The churches cannot have a 
revival, and all of our children seem to 
be going to the bad. Everyone here be- 
longs to some kind of a secret society, 
and I never could see anything good in 
them. ' 

The next evening a big Baptist dea- 
con walked up to me with a tract called 
"Freemasonry," and asked me where I 
got it. I took the tract and showed him 
your address on the back, and he was 
very angry. He said, "I don't see why 
some Mason has not killed the man who 
got out that tract. I bet he will be 
killed, and it is not at all wise in you to 
give that to anyone." I asked him why, 
and he said, "Because masonry will not 
stand it. When her secrets are told, 
someone has got to suffer for it, and you 
will not be left out!'' I said, "Well, who 
will kill me? If you are a good deacon 
like Stephen — I know that a good Chris- 
tian would not kill me." He hung his 
head and said, "No, I would not, but 
there are men in the Lodge who would 
do such things." I said, "Brother, why 
are you yoked up with such things, and 
such men?" He just walked away from 
me and never said another word. I said, 
"Poor man ; God help him to get his eyes 
open." 

Trenton, Tenn., August 13, 1912. 

Satan has captured nearly all the peo- 
ple about here, but Jesus can cast him 
out with His word, and of a truth He 
has given me His word, and sent me to 
my people. As He sent this message to 
the children of Israel, so has He sent 
-me to this people. (Ezek. 2:3-7.) 

A man came to me last week while I 
was in Dyersburg, and said to me, "Sis- 
ter Roberson, I am not a Mason, but I 
have two friends who are, and we went 
out to the church one Sunday evening 
and heard you lecture against lodges. 
When you spoke of the first three de- 
grees of masonry, I looked at my two 
friends, and they looked as though they 
were going to faint, and we went out as 
soon as you closed. One of the men said 



to me, 'Look here, someone will shoot 
that woman down on the street. I just 
know that someone, white or black, will 
do it.' ' The gentleman said to his 
friend, "Is that masonry?" Then the 
Mason came to his senses, and said, "No, 
that is not masonry." The gentleman 
said, "Well, friend, if it is not masonry, 
why would anyone want to kill a poor, 
innocent woman ?'' He answered, "Be- 
cause she is trying to expose us, but she 
can't do it, and she ought to be made to 
stop talking against us, because our lodge 
is just as good as the Church. We 
make men better than the Church, and 
that is why the people do not care for 
the Church. It don't do anything for 
fallen humanity." The gentleman said, 
"My good man, what are you talking 
about? , Jesus Christ died for the Church 
that men might come into . the Church 
and be saved.". "Well," he said, "The 
Church is not doing for the people what 
masonry does." The gentleman said, 
"No, I don't think the true Church has 
anything in it so bad as to want to kill 
a poor, innocent woman for talking 
about it." Just at this time the other 
masonic friend said, "If that was not 
masonry that Sister Roberson exposed, 
then there is no such thing as masonry." 
When he said that it was masonry, the 
other Mason jumped to his feet, looked 
at his brother Mason, and fled. He did 
not want the gentleman who was not a 
Mason to hear that, but the man said, "It 
is masonry just the same, and I for my 
part am going to quit it from today, and 
I wish Sister Roberson would come to 
my house and lecture to the people up 
there, for they have all forsaken the 
Church." He said, "The lodge is 
damning the negro race. Nearly all the 
preachers are in them, and they are tell- 
ing men to go into them. That is why I 
am in the thing, but I will not stay in 
another day, for they do kill men and 
protect murders and thieves. If a man 
has raped a woman and they can get him 
out of the clutches of the law, they will 
do it." I told him that I knew of just 
such a case myself. A few years ago 
when I was in Pine Bluff something like 
that happened. There was a white fam- 
ily living right behind the Colored Sanc- 
tified church, and the sisters of the 
church had their Bible lessons there 



l:,-l 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



every Monday. One evening while they 
were down at prayer, they heard such 
a noise at the back of the church that 
they ^topped praying and went to see 
what was the matter. When they got 
out in the churchyard, they saw that the 
noise came from the white people's yard 
that adjoined the church in the rear. 
They got up on the fence, and peered 
over into the next yard, and found that 
the noise came from a little house that 
stood in a patch of corn close by. In a 
few minutes they saw a white woman 
roll out of that house nearly exhausted 
fighting for her life, and trying to get 
away from a black man. When the sis- 
ters saw it they ran, and yelled and 
screamed at the man until he let the 
woman go, and fled. One of the sisters 
chased him as far as the steps of the 
Normal School, and by that time others 
had telephoned and nearly all the offi- 
cers in Pine Bluff were on his track. 
They hunted him day and night. One 
night while sitting on my porch I heard 
some young people talking about it, and 
one said. "They will never get him be- 
cause he is a K. of P. and they will get 
him out of the way." When I heard 
that, I said, "My soul, what will become 
of the souls of men if they will protect 
a dog like that?" I know one thing. 
They never did catch that wretch. 
Yours for Christ, 

Lizzie Roberson. 



THE NATIONAL CONVENTION, 



THE OPEN PARLIAMENT. 
REV, WM. DILLON, D, D., CHAIRMAN. 

Air. Dillon : We should like to hear 
from Mrs. Amanda Smith ; we would 
be glad to have her come forward and 
speak for five minutes in the place of 
Mrs. Lizzie Woods Roberson, who has 
been detained by the sickness of a sister. 

Mrs. Amanda Smith : Mr. President, 
Gentlemen and Ladies. I am not in the 
best condition physically to talk or do 
anything else. I am not well, have not 
been for quite a little while, but I want- 
ed to come here. I get a little help and 
encouragement and strength when I go 
into a meeting. I am hid away so and 
out of touch with things generally, that 
I used to be familiar with — conventions 



and temperance meetings, etc. — that I 
was very glad to get here in time to hear 
some of the speeches that have been 
made. 

I have nothing but good to say about 
the National Christian Association. They 
consented to make me a member of this 
Association, and I was very glad of it. 
And I appreciate their kindness. 

There are many things that you say 
that I know a little about, but I cannot 
say them as well as you say them. All 
of you express yourselves so nicely, and 
I am so weak in so many ways. I used 
to sing my way out, if I could not talk 
out, I could sing out, but I have got so 
now I cannot sing much. My throat and 
chest are not in condition to do that. In 
my work I have been more than ever 
convinced of some things that I had not 
looked into as deeply as I have lately. 
In this work of my orphans' home (I 
have an orphans' home for colored chil- 
dren in Harvey), I have a much harder 
time now than I used to. I used to be 
able to get helpers — I am past seventy- 
five years now, and I am feeling things 
more physically than I used to. I cannot 
work as well. The care and responsi- 
bilities are breaking me down. I cannot 
do many things that I used to — that 
brings me to think now as I did not be- 
fore, of the need of help. There are lots 
of things that ought to be done in work 
of this kind for the children, and what 
not about the home, that I cannot get my 
people to do. I think one of the reasons 
is my position in regard to those secret 
organizations. Somehow or other, I 
don't think much of them. Hence my 
people don't want to do things for me, 
because I am not a member of their se- 
cret orders. Someone will come to see 
me, and when they see that I am fully 
committed to fear God and to go in His 
direction, and am determined not to 
wabble about and join this thing and 
that and everything that comes along, 
they let me down. I see very clearly, if 
I was a member of some of these secret 
societies I could get most everybody to 
work for me that I wanted to, only I 
could not get the Lord to work for me. 
I would rather have the favor of the 
Lord and a clear conscience in regard to 
it, than to have all the rest. 

I see work that ought to be done : I 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



155 



cannot do it; but one of the things I am 
glad of is that notwithstanding all this, 
down deep in my own heart I have a 
peace. What I cannot do and can't get 
anybody else to do, I don't have done, 
and the Lord keeps me in peace; away 
down deep in my soul, there is a peace 
unspeakable. Xow it is all these facts 
that I see and cannot help — but do you 
know I think that is very sweet. It is 
to me. 

I have got to be an old woman and 
cannot go about like I used to, and at- 
tend all the conventions I used to attend, 
and I say sometimes to myself : "I won- 
der if the devil is after me to make me 
be quiet?" Perhaps I ought to fuss a 
little bit, but I am so peaceful. Oh, the 
deepness of the peace, the deepness of 
peace ! It is the thing I appreciate, and 
thank the Lord for 

"If I could sing I would like to sing 
one of those songs : "If I go forward 
still, 'tis Jehovah's will." The Lord is 
bringing things to pass and we will all 
have a shower of blessing when it comes. 
Then forward still, 'tis Jehovah's will, 

Though the billows dash in spray. 
With a conquering tread, just push ahead, 

He rolled the sea away. 

Mr. Dillon: Xow we have reserved 
the best for the last. W. P>. Stoddard 
will address us. 

W. B. Stoddard : I am a little, per- 
haps, like the man that was to give a lec- 
ture on the devil, and the advertisements 
said that everybody should hear him be- 
cause he was full of his subject. I hard- 
ly know what to say in the live minutes. 
I have been delighted with what I have 
heard, and so much interested in what 
others were saying that my mind is not 
very settled as to what I can bring to 
you. Brother Phillips said, "Speak about 
'The Lodges for Women and Children.' ' 

Xow the lodge has design, it has dis- 
position, and it has devices. A farmer 
has weeds ; he wants corn. He makes 
a device for the killing of weeds and the 
raising of corn. The devil is wary in his 
seeking for men's souls. He has his 
plans, his devices, his means for securing 
his end. He is not averse to using wom- 
en and children. I used to go fishing 
when a boy out here on Rock River, and 
I learned quite a number of things that 
have since been helpful to me. One of 



the successful ways of getting fish was 
what we called the out-line. We put a 
peg down on the shore ; running out 
from the peg was a line into the river; 
on the end of the line was a sinker. 
Running out from the main line were lit- 
tle lines, and on these little lines were 
placed a hook and the bait. We discov- 
ered that if we were to catch fish, we 
had to get different kinds of hooks and 
different kinds of bait. Of course the 
suckers would hitch on to almost any- 
thing ; they were not very particular ; 
but if we wanted the choicer fish, we 
had to get something that would be at- 
tractive to them, and so we arranged our 
lines according to the fish that we ex- 
pected to get. In the morning as we 
pulled in the main line we had the whole 
outfit. It didn't make any difference 
whether they were bullheads or suckers 
or whitefish, or some other kind of fish, 
they were all there. 

We used to have masonry chiefly to 
contend with. When I first began this 
work, years ago, the masonic lodge was 
the main lodge, and, in fact, there were 
a few others. We didn't have then the 
owls and eagles and monkeys and white 
rats and all of these various kinds. All 
of these other lodges have been coming 
in, for Satan is a shrewd fisherman, and 
he found that it was necessary in order 
to catch all kinds to fix up his devices 
with • different kinds of bait. We now 
have women's lodges : we have children's 
lodges ; we have the lodges for the col- 
lege people ; we have lodges for the sol- 
diers ; we have the lodges for the saifors ; 
we have the lodges for the railroad man : 
for the farmers : and each has a hook and 
a bait that is calculated to catch the in- 
dividual which lie desires to get. 

I noticed in the paper yesterday that 
those who were hunting foxes found that 
they could appeal to the curiosity of the 
fox with the largest hope of success. 
The fox was suspicious, he was careful, 
and he watched where he went. They 
did not put the trap right with the bait. 
Some of the animals you know you can 
catch by putting the trap right with the 
bait, but the fox would be scared if the 
bait were put with the trap, but trap is 
ptit in one place and the bait quite a little 
ways off. The paper stated that the fox 
would approach this bait, suspecting that 



156 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



there was some design to catch him, and 
he would walk around in a large circle 
and then as he became a little bolder and 
his desire to find out became a little 
greater, he would come a little bit closer 
and so he would keep closing in and clos- 
ing in until finally he would come where 
the trap was, and then they would catch 
him in that way. Xow this desire for 
secret knowledge — this curiosity — seems 
to be universal. People want to find out. 
The lodge has this as one of its prime 
devices for the catching of men. It 
appeals to curiosity. It places the bait 
where it must be sought after, and the 
individual presses on and on, and his 
curiosity is increased as he stands look- 
ing at the thing before him ; then he goes 
in and so is finally secured. 

Pastors are finding everywhere that 
these smaller lodges are often greater 
hindrances to their work than were the 
larger ones. I was talking with a pastor 
of a Lutheran church, he said, "We used 
to have our men going to the lodges, and 
then we had difficulty in holding the 
church meetings ; but/' he said, "I am 
about ready to resign, I am so discour- 
aged since they have gotten the women 
to join, and now the children." In Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania, they have a chil- 
dren's, or young people's, lodge in which 
.one of the members is styled a high 
priest! One of the pastors in speaking 
of this children's lodge spoke of the dif- 
ficulty that he found in getting persons, 
after they have gotten into such a socie- 
ty, to see the truths of the Gospel, and to 
get into real touch with the Church. 

I rejoice with you that the National 
Christian Association is doing- this work ; 
and I think we have every reason to re- 
joice. The light is shining out; men are 
being liberated and the truth will finally 
triumph : and God will reign in this 
world. 

People often ask me if I expect to 
have any success. I tell them I have suc- 
cess all the time ; I take it right along 
with me. God is sure to succeed and our 
work is going to succeed, notwithstand- 
ing the devices of Satan. His designs 
are far-reaching, his disposition is ex- 
ceedingly secret, and he has been won- 
derfully successful in winning men; yet 
I believe that God is on our side ; that 
we are indeed going forward, and that 



we are going to have eventually an eter- 
nal victory. 

Committee on Resolutions Reports. 

The Committee on Resolutions re- 
ported through its Chairman, Rev. J. J. 
Hiemenga, as follows : 

1. First of all the Association expresses its 
thanks to God for the many blessings received 
in the past year on the work that has been 
accomplished, for the strength given to all 
laborers in the cause and for the results ob- 
tained. 

2. That the outlook for the work of the 
Association is encouraging.- , There are signs 
that indicate that the powers, of secrecy are 
weakening, and that they eventually will be 
entirely overthrown by the onward progress 
of those of truth and righteousness led by the 
great Captain of our Salvation. 

3. That special mention should l>e made of 
the work done in the legislatures of some 
states as greatly encouraging. High school 
fraternities and sororities are prohibited in 
several places, which is due in part to some 
very effective work done by the Association. 

4. That, with the promise of God's blessing 
and the assured success of the work before 
us. we continue with united efforts and energy 
in this particular sphere of the Master's work, 
spreading forth the light of His Gospel to save 
from darkness those that are still bound by 
the deceitfulness of secrecy. 

The phrase in the second resolution 
that : "There are signs that indicate that 
the powers of secrecy are weakening" 
evoked a lively discussion. 

Mr. Bond : I would like to get a little 
information as to what is considered 
signs of weakness in the Lodge. In busi- 
ness, if we make a big success, we would 
count that signs of strength. One lodge 
gave away twelve thousand watches as 
prizes for getting the largest number of 
members, i know that there is another 
secret society figuring on giving away a 
stereopticon. There never has been a 
time in the history of the country when 
lodges were increasing at such a rapid 
rate as today. The membership is grow- 
ing by leaps and bounds ; the lodges of 
children and women are multiplying 
more rapidly than those of the men at 
the present time. It seems to be that 
there never was a time when the Lodge 
was stronger than it is now. When we 
consider that God is not on the secret 
society side, then we acknowledge the 
weakness of the Lodge ; but when we 
consider the Lodge as it is we find it 
exceedingly strong, and we do not want 
to fool ourselves with the idea that we 



•ptembcr. 1 12 



CHRIST I AX CYNOSURE. 



157 



are overthrowing the Lodge. The men 
that we are getting out of the lodge are 
few in number to those going in. The 
men that we are keeping from the lodge 
— I do not suppose that amounts to a 
tithe or ten in a hundred, to those that go 
into the lodges. From the most minor 
lodge to that of the Masons, the same 
general plan is being worked. They have 
men organized specially for this building 
up of the Secret Empire — studying up 
means to get men into the lodge by every 
plan they can devise, but any way to get 
them in, and it seems to me that it is a 
mistake to state that the lodge is weak. 
<jT that it is getting weak, for I do not 
believe that it is true. 



Mr. Dillon: Brother Stoddard, let me 
address you as the Chairman. In the 
city where I live, we have been attack- 
ing the lodges and we said to them 
i Brother Moses Clemmons said to them 
in our daily paper ) that we have a man 
here that will discuss the merits of the 
question with any of you. or with any- 
body you shall get. and we have cowed 
them down : they are under our feet : 
they dared not attempt to defend the 
Lodge. They have enough good sense 
to know that their lodges are so weak 
and so vulnerable that if they discus? 
them they lose ground. 

I did discuss the question once with a 
Mason. They were arranging to build a 
lodge hall and organize a lodge in that 
town, but they didn't get their lodge, be- 
cause they discussed it ! Then again, the 
great mass of men that are in the lodges 
do not thoroughly believe in them. I 
have got some inside information. A 
Methodist preacher who had been a Ala- 
son for years and had never withdrawn 
from it said to me that he was in the 
lodge one night with another Methodist 
preacher and they went from labor to 
refreshment, which is a recess, and that 
preacher said to him. "Brother Day. I 
feel that this is not the place for a 
preacher at all." He replied: "I take 
just as little of this as I can and get 
along." Thev know it is not the place 
for a Christian at all. and there is a 
weakness there. I talked with another 
Methodist preacher some time ago. and I 
said to him. "I have known some Meth- 
odic preachers that have demitted. and 



do not attend the lodge" i he was one of 
that kind), and he said. 'Do you know 
of any of them that are otherwise than 
that?" He knew from the imide. that 
the mass of Methodist preacher- do not 
attend the Lodge. They know its utter 
weakness and indefensibility. I defy 
any man that lives — I will discuss with 
any man on this ground, and affirm that 
the -ecret lodge system conflicts with the 
teachings of Christ, with the principles 
of Scripture, and with the civil institu- 
- of our country, and if they want to 
bump their head against mine, they can 
nave a chance. I have been on the arena 
before, and I am willing to stand there 
again, and with any man that they have 
got. 

And then again, the unions have in- 
jured the reputation of the lodges and 
weakened them. The McXamaras who 
with sixteen sticks of dynamite blew up 
the printing office and killed 21 men. 
and then got Darrow to defend them. 
He failed and the only way to save their 
lives was to confess and to ask for mer- 
er. That has gone all over the country 
and has weakened the Secret Empire. 

Then in my state, in Indianapolis, a 
few weeks ago they indicted fifty-four of 
these union men. and their trial is to 
ccrne oft in October. The secret lodge 
system is the devil's master-piece. He 
v. ill never locate a better thing to de- 
ceive and mislead souls while he lives. 
I am sure, and yet it is weak. God 
Almighty is against it : and all good men 
that understand the lodge are against it : 
and even men that do not profess reli- 
gion, and yet have a good deal of com- 
mon sense, are against it. and I know 
that it is weak, verv weak. 



Mrs. Frink: Just a word. Perhaps 
another proof that the Lodge is not 
strong is seen in our president and ex- 
president running through the countrv 
doing the work against each other that 
they are. It shows that the bond of ma- 
sonry and of secret organizations — the 
tie that binds — is very weak ! .And it 
seems to me that just one member of 
this National Christian Association can 
put a thousand of them to flight, and two 
can put ten thousand to flight. 

Mr. Worrell : This resolution -hould 



158 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



be adopted, if it is adopted, by faith and 
not by sight. I do not believe the secret 
lodge is weak. It has been called "Sa- 
tan's masterpiece." Perhaps it is. I 
don't know ; I don't know whether Satan 
has played his last card. I do not know 
whether Satan has worked his last and 
best ; I think not. I think there are more 
"masterpieces" yet to be exhibited to 
men, and you have not seen the last of 
them. However, I don't count the secret 
lodge weak. I know the argument. I 
was brought up an anti-mason. I am 
the son of a minister who suffered be- 
cause of the position he took years ago. 
I can make an anti-masonic argument. 
I do it quite frequently. Not so much 
from the platform of late as in private. 
There is not a man in this world on the 
basis of the Gospel, or the basis of civil 
liberty, or democratic institutions, or on 
the basis of God, or Home or Native 
Land, who can make an argument for 
the lodge. No such thing is possible. 
Nevertheless, it is a strong institution, 
and the man that would call it Satan's 
masterpiece ought not to berate its 
strength. When Roderick Dhu met Fitz 
James he called him carpet knight and 
all that sort of thing, and finally when 
Fitz James answered back he said, "I 
thank thee for the word ; it nerves my 
heart," and when the two men went at it 
he did not find a carpet knight, but he 
found that his own gigantic form was 
prostrate. If this is Satan's masterpiece 
there must be something of the strength 
in it that Jesus spoke of when He com- 
pared Himself to the man stronger than 
the strong man who binds him before 
he enters his house and takes his goods. 
That is what we are at, and it seems to 
me like boy's talk — buckling on a little 
drum and tin sword and that kind of 
thing — to speak of the lodge as weak. I 
do not believe it at all. Of course, I 
know that the Devil is weak as com- 
pared with the Almighty ; of course I 
know that he is nothing but a poor, con- 
temptible changeling, who never goes 
anywhere or does anything that he is not 
permitted to do. That is Presbyterian- 
ism. I suppose you understand the doc- 
trine I stand for. 

The Lodge is going on and on. I ex- 
pect to see the development of Anti- 
Christ if I live long enough; I see signs 



of his development. I heard the presi- 
dent of Wheaton college say to me in 
my own home twenty years ago, when I 
was beginning to preach, he said, "Wor- 
rell, the Anti-Christ is coming out of the 
Lodge." I cannot say that he holds such 
a thought today. It may be that he has 
changed his mind about that by this time, 
I don't know ; but if that be true, I doubt 
that you have his "masterpiece" before 
you. 

There are good signs ; this school tus- 
sle, this working in of the women may 
do good. The men may get sick of tak- 
ing care of the baby, that the women 
may go to the Eastern Star. I have men in 
my church who tell me that the plumbers 
and carpenters are saying that these 
things are interfering with personal lib- 
erty, going against the family institutions 
of this country ; they know that the 
lodges are disintegrating the churches ; 
and a 32d degree Mason said that the 
men are kept away from the churches in 
shoals by the lodge. But to pass that 
resolution — I think the Lodge is going 
down, with the rest of the things that 
this world constructs, when God takes 
hold and when He brings in the King- 
dom. You know all about the revivals 
that are worked up ; you know about all 
the people running, about building up the 
Kingdom ! They are doing nothing of 
the sort ; the Kingdom will come when 
He who sits upon his throne turns to the 
Blessed One, the Anointed One, the 
Glorious One, and gives Him the King- 
dom, then it will be here, and secret so- 
cieties will go down with the rest of the 
human devices and institutions, along 
with all the world powers that Daniel 
and John saw ; they will all go together. 
The Lodge will be here then, and will 
le destroved. 



Air. Dillon : I think that we are on 
God's side, instead of God being on our 
side. 

Air. Clemmons : I think there is a mis- 
understanding. If you will read the res- 
olution carefully you will not read : the 
forces of secrecy are not strong. The 
wording is "the forces of secrecy are 
weakening," and I believe that if we 
have knowledge of the facts we will say 
that the Secret Empire as a whole is 
beginning to crumble. The very fact 



September, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



159 



that lodge men are asking the legisla- 
tures of the states to legislate against 
anti-secrecy shows their weakness. They 
have no other defense. They contradict 
the Constitution of the United States, 
and their own individual states, and it is 
quite evident that they are on their last 
legs, and that the forces of the Secret 
Empire are beginning to crumble. Some 
of the lodges are going to pieces finan- 
cially, because they are compelled to 
raise the premiums to such an extent 
that they are driving hundreds and thou- 
sands of their members out of these 
lodges. 

Mr. Stoddard: The fact that the in- 
herent principles of the lodge are com- 
ing to the front, are becoming known, 
makes them weak. When they become 
apparent to the public, the institution it- 
self must go down. 

Years ago the people used to think 
that these secret mysteries — they had a 
kind of reverence for them, and hence 
looked upon them with more favor than 
today ; but when the real nature of the 
mysteries is brought to the surface, the 
weakness of the thing itself is made ap- 
parent. It seems to me that in the verv 
nature of things the lodges, increasing as 
they have been, together with the ex- 
posure of their mysteries, are weakening 
themselves and being in the eyes of the 
public. 



Mr. Fischer: I would like to have the 
resolution read so that we will know ex- 
actly what the wording is. 

"There are signs that indicate that the 
powers of secrecy are weakening, and 
that they eventually will be entirely over- 
thrown by the onward progress of those 
oi truth and righteousness led by the 
great Captain of our Salvation." 

Mr. Hiemenga : There are signs that 
the forces of secrecy are weakening, and 
that thev finally will be entirely over- 
thrown by the onward progress of truth 
and righteousness led by the great Cap- 
tain of our Salvation. I have been asked 
to explain that. I think that the secret 
organization as a whole is strong, very 
strong, but suppose it were ten times as 
strong as it is today, if what has been 
said here in this meeting this afternoon 
is true, then I still maintain that there 
are signs that indicate that they are 



weakening. There is no such statement 
made as that the Secret Empire is weak. 
We all believe that it is a mighty force, 
and it is strong, it is very strong; and a 
handful of laborers against such a 
mighty force does not seem to mean very 
much, but we know that usually God 
does not figure with numbers. The 
Midianites were much stronger than the 
Israelites. I wish simply to express the 
thought that there are signs that give 
information of the lodges weakness, and 
I believe the signs are true. 



Mr. Harrell : I see the elements of 
weakness in the orders more and more; 
that is moral weakness, spiritual weak- 
ness. The power of the lodge is a phy- 
sical, world power; it is not the power of 
truth and righteousness. Truth is 
almighty. The truth in the mouth of a 
little child is stronger than a lie on the 
tongue of the biggest giant that ever 
walked on the earth, and I like the ring 
of that resolution because I believe that 
God lives. Xow, I care nothing in par- 
ticular about the development of Anti- 
christ. What is Anti-Christ anyway" 
He is simply the Devil. You don't have 
to go on the other side of the grave- 
yard to find devils. There are plenty of 
them on this side, in their attitude to- 
ward God. Had the Devil himself pow- 
er he would turn religion out of the 
world and lock the door of God's own 
world against Him. if he could do it. 
Xow I never looked forward to a time 
when the Anti-Christ character will be 
more fully developed than it is today. 
Xever ! And as far as the great princi- 
pality and power of the lodge system 
is concerned, I am not worrying one par- 
ticle about the foundations of our holy 
Christianity. Babylon when she falls 
will come down in one hour. It will 
not take a long, gradual process of 
changes and interchanges to bring it 
about. God will bring it down in one 
swoop. I have the victory by faith. I 
take it for granted that God is on the 
throne. When men ask me if I am not 
afraid to stand up and say so and so in 
the pulpit, I say, "I see nothing to be 
afraid of ; I am working for a God that 
is Almighty and I find His Truth is 
Almighty, and when I go into a field the 
first thing I do is to compel the men 



160 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1912. 



that are running the lodge business to 
absolutely lie down and surrender, and 
display the white flag." How do I do it? 
If it cannot be done in any other way I 
read the lodge rituals. Suppose I read 
the Masonic Ritual and a lot of Masons 
come to hear it. Here is some vile- 
mouthed, rattle-brained man that has no 
truth about him, who jumps up and says 
that the ritual is not right. How does 
his lie affect the other Masons when they 
know that he is a liar? He has destroyed 
their confidence in him. 

I want to tell you we have the lever of 
God's eternal truth in our hands, and 
the reason why God's cause is not mov- 
ing forward to-day as it ought to move, 
• is simply because too many of our min- 
isters are afraid to even cheep on this 
theme. The Devil has them cowed down 
and they are afraid to stand up ; but I 
tell you these men are correct when they 
say the Lodge is showing signs of weak- 
ening. They are desperate. Note their 
efforts to put a law through the legisla- 
ture in Ohio. When there was no other 
refuge for them they undertook to stop 
men from speaking against the order 
and exposing it by legislation, but when 
they tried it there was such a storm of 
protest went in against that infamous 
bill that it was snowed under. How did 
they get along out in California? How 
did they make it with Governor John- 
son? The Devil is making some of the 
most desperate efforts he ever made in 
his life to hinder the cause of Jesus 
Christ ; but he is getting the worst of it. 
This little bunch of people is not all 
there is to this anti-secrecy movement. 
The Devil never had a greater proposi- 
tion on his hands than he has to-day. 
And so far as the moral and spiritual 
strength and intellectual strength of the 
kingdom of darkness is concerned, it is 
as weak and unstable as water. We 
have the victory by faith. I have got it. 



Air. Fischer : I think the resolution 
good. We find signs that the Lodge is 
strengthening, and that is perfectly con- 
sistent ; there are signs that the power 
of the Lodge is becoming stronger, and 
there are signs that the power is weak- 
ening. The fact that this sister referred 
to, these two Masons, is one sign ; that 
we have in our country, our President, 



who was initiated into the Masonic 
lodge, and our ex-President, also initi- 
ated into the Alasonic lodge, if newspa- 
per accounts are correct, how much they! 
really care for the oath of the lodge. Is? 
the oath that binds a Mason to a Mason, 
is it as strong as it used to be? I think 
not. I think it is weaker. I should 
oppose a resolution that said the 
Lodge is getting weak, and I should 
oppose a resolution that said the 
Lodge is getting stronger ; but I 
don't care anything about that ; if 
we are fighting a losing battle all the 
time, and if we have to wait until the 
consummation of all things, that is com- 
ing, and then do nothing, then we don't 
want any resolution of this kind ; but if 
there is some advantage in fighting 
against the lodge, and if that will possi- 
bly hasten the day, I want to be counted 
in for the work ; and the words our 
brother spoke when I came in, as to the. 
effect of the work of the National Chris- 
tian Association are signs that our- 
work is not in vain. If there are not, 
such signs at all, I think I could find 
some other work in which I could engage 
where there are some signs of success at 
least, or some use in the work we are 
doing. 

I would like to leave you one Scripture 
text which also applies, I think: "Fear 
not, little flock; it is the Father's good 
pleasure to give you the kingdom/' And 
the other is almost as true, although it is 
not from the Bible: "Whom the gods 
wish to destroy they first make mad." 

The resolution was then adooted. 



MENAGERIE STOCK. 

Barnum and Bailey's stock of one kind 
was increased from 70 to 100 in a sin- 
gle evening, and this lodge of moose is 
said to be the only traveling lodge in 
the country. It is Composed wholly of 
employes of Barnum and Bailey, and is 
a circus within a circus, or a menagerie 
side show. Show is not just the word- 
for what makes a specialty of hiding, as i 
every kind of lodge appears to. 

The local members marched to the circus 
grounds and back again," escorting the circus 
lodge, the marchers being headed by the circus 
band. At Clark Hall the initiation was done 
by the staff of the circus lodge. A reception 
followed. 



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&WEET SYMURE! 
FAR FIXED 

'In Spotless Fields, 

mm In The Regiohs 

^OF THE <*> 

Polar Night, 
Thou Serv'st 
A WAYMARK 




THE TREE GOD PLANTS. 



The wind that blows can never kill 

The tree God plants ; 
It bloweth east ; it bloweth west ; 
The tender leaves have little rest, 
But any wind that blows is best, 

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Strikes deeper root, grows higher 

Still, 
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will 

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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

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iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiii i iiiB 



Webster* 
New International 



CONTENTS 



Marlboro, by Miss Susan F. Hinman 161 

The Truth Shall Make You Free, by Pres. 
C. A. Blanchard .165 

The Broken Seal, by Sam'l D. Greene. ...169 

"The Relation of the Church and the Min- 
ister to the Lodge" 172 

Sister Lizzie Ree, Poem, by A. Thomson.. 170 

The National Convention — 

Excluding Secretists. by Rev. Win. Dil- 
lon, D. D 171 

Secret Societies Assailed 177 

Editorial — 

"The Church vs. The Lodge" 178 

Some Reasons 17!) 

Two Inferences 17!) 

Distempered Minds 180 

Masonic Principle and Practice 181 

Black or White ]81 

Theatrical Ramblers ; 182 

Anything to Amuse i.82 

News of Our Work — 

Contributions 183 

Ohio Convention 183 

Stoddard in Pennsylvania 183 

Agent Davidson's Doings 184 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 185 

A Kentucky Harvest 1 8li 

From Our Mail — 

An Open Letter, by Walker Mayfield. .. .180 
Encouraging words, from Rev. L. List, 
.Eld. T. J. Rosenberger. Rev"' G. A. Peg- 
ram. Rev. H. F. Stubbs and Geo. A. 
Shealey l,s!) 



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'Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to tne world; aud in secret have I said nothing/' John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLV. 



CHICAGO, OCTOBER, 1912. 



NUMBER 6. 








CHAPTER I. 
Just at the Gate. 

It was a raw autumn moraine. 



of smoke-tangled 



A pall 



mist bung - over the 



great city, which even the searching lake 
wind could not dispel. A queue of wait- 
ing passengers with their iriends jammed 
the wickets of the gloomy railway sta- 
tion. The tide of summer travel had 
ebbed, but a new and mighty stream had 
replaced it, the tide of ardent youth set- 
ting college-ward. Gay, thoughtless, 
slangy, extreme in dress and speech, 
headstrong and impetuous in pursuit of 
pleasure, they are, nevertheless, the ris- 
ing hope of our nation. 

Less conspicuous than many in the 
lively throng were two girls, the sim- 
plicity and tastefulness of whose dress 
were in marked contrast to some of their 
neighbors. The younger of the two was 
taking leave of a careworn, almost shab- 
by, middle-aged man, evidently her 
father. 

"O Daddy," she exclaimed in a soft, 
though high-pitched voice, "please run 
away quick, before you see me cry. I 
promised Mother I wouldn't, but I shall, 
I know I shall. If you would repeat the 
multiplication table, or something sooth- 
ing, before you go ! Thank you so much 
for taking a whole morning to see me so 
far on my journey, and tell Mother" — 
her arms were about his neck now, and 



her face buried on his shoulder — "tell 
Mother these are not tears, as she might 
suppose, but that you were caught in a 
bad shower in Chicago. O, Dearest, how 
can I leave you ?" 

There was a preliminary cough from 
the engine ; the hands of the nearby 
clock-tower pointed painfully near ten- 
thirty ; the father gently unfastened the 
clinging arms and slipped away, pursued 
by kisses flung from small, gray-gloved 
fingers*. He lingered an instant beneath 
her car window to breathe a prayer for 
his only daughter, in whose budding 
womanhood he renewed the romance of 
his youth. How could he spare her, the 
oldest of the little flock, the sunshine of 
the home? "My Ruth, God bless her!" 
he sighs and turns away. 

Ruth turned volubly to her quieter 
companion. "I know I shall be horribly 
homesick ; I feel it coming on now : a 
mixture of lovesickness and seasickness, 
they say — ugh !" She went through a 
droll pantomime of mal-de-mer. "As for 
lovesickness, well, I had a touch of jeal- 
ousy once, and of all torturing, degrading 
emotions ! She was a queenly creature 
who used to listen to my foolish spouting 
with a worshipful air. Believe me. there 



nothing so absolutely ensnarin 



ST, mv 



dear, as the gift of listening. Then some- 
body else came along who was older and 
richer and very much more worth while 






CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 1912. 



than L and she transferred her worship 
to the Usurper. Oh. how I suffered!" 
Ruth shook her head with girlhood's 
mingling of tragedy and comedy, and 
pushed back a bright curling lock. 

"I was young then, of course."' she re- 
sumed with the superior air of eighteen. 
'"It must have been all of two years ago. 
[ haven't thought of it before in ages. 
My one thought now is college — COL- 
LEGE, in large capitals. And yet. Col- 
lege is only a means to an end. Do you 
know the secret ambition of my inmost 
soul?" — with a lowered voice and a mel- 
odramatic air — '"it is to Go Abroad." 

She sank back with shining eyes and 
an intake of breath. "'The Old World. 
that realm of enchantment. More en- 
ticing than the Golden Mountain to the 
sordid fancy of the Celestial of a cycle 
ago — for you should know, my dear, that 
'a cycle of Cathay" is only sixty years. 
The Old World, my 'house of fulfilment/ 
a vision of beauty, illumined with the 
light that never was on sea or land ! Oh. 
I'm phmib daffy on the subject! 

"But. on the other hand. I'm just eat- 
en up with ignorance. You know Mrs. 
Browning says 

With what cracked pitchers we go to 

deep wells 
In this wc rid : 

and Emerson tells us that we bring back 
from Europe only what we take there. 
I don't want to think of Rome as the 
place where 'Pa bought them socks." 

' '■ . • Rome, my country, city of the 
soul !* Think, only think. Celia. how 
much one must learn to appreciate it all. 
There's the historic interest, the literary 
interest, the art interest." She checked 
them off on her lingers. "Take history: 
what do you know about the Guelphs and 
the Ghibellines ? — and that isn't a circum- 
stance ! We had a whole hour's lecture 
the • ther night on the history of Siena. 
Do you know whether Siena is in Hol- 
land or Russia? And then, literature and 
art. Oh.- dear! I don't know whether 
the artist Raphael and the archangel 
Raphael are one and the same, or wheth- 
er one is real and the other mythical, or 
whether both are myths." She sighed 
with comic despair. 

"Now that, to my notion." she re- 
sumed more seriously, "is what College 



is for. I am a rattlebrain and an ignor- 
amus, but I can't bear to be a Philistine. 
Some Americans who go abroad are 
mere marauding swine. I want to feel 
that I am kin to all the great things I see. 

"But that isn't all. After I have ab- 
sorbed Europe — like the girl who sat on 
the banks of the Grand Canal in Venice 
and drank it all in — I want to come home 
and write the long-expected Great Amer- 
ican Novel. It will be a thriller, of 
course, but it will be more, a vade me- 
cum } a compendium of practical philos- 
ophy, a Guide to Life. Oh. I'm not am- 
bitious, not the least little bit! 

"Now. Celia. having listened to these 
Confessions of an Egotist, tell me why 
you go to college." 

The older girl smiled thoughtfully. "I 
suppose." she said, "it is the line of least 
resistance. I think I have inherited a 
kind of book-sense: my mother some- 
times tells me it is the only sense I have. 
I must prepare to teach. I suppose, but 
I think, too. I should like to learn really 
to use books, and not merely to appre- 
ciate their power and beauty and good- 
ness." 

Meanitme, in the coach ahead, two 
lads bound for the same institution, were 
occupied, as it chanced, with the same 
theme. 

Lyman Russell, the elder of the two. 
was tall and spare, with thin, serious face 
and square shoulders, held somewhat 
stiffly. The other. Bayard Kent, had a 
slight figure and delicate features, with 
a quick, responsiveness in his eyes and a 
delicate flush like a girl's. Their first 
meeting was like the meeting of David 
and Jonathan. In the midst of rampant 
gaiety and laughter from fellow students, 
the two were soon fathoms deep in seri- 
ous talk. 

"Are you going to college, or being 
sent to college?" asked Lyman suddenly. 
Bayard found nothing offensive in this 
brusque inquiry, but laughed medita- 
tively. 

"Well, as I'm of age. I should hate to 
say that I was being sen:. Still. I fear 
it's more or less a conventional thing. I 
should like better to be out at work in 
the world. 'There's a reason.' ' The 
readv color flushed his cheek. The rea- 
son was a girl. "Fve been coddled." add- 
ed Bavard lightly, "or I should be out 



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104 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1912. 



Greek, Latin and Mathematics, and I'd 
peg along there like the Lotophagi." 

"Oh, you can he a Lotus-eater in Marl- 
boro as well as anywhere, if scholarship 
is your idea of lotus-eating. It isn't mine. 
It isn't most people's. In these days of 
materialism and pragmatism, it's a hght, 
even in our institutions of higher learn- 
ing, to maintain scholarly ideals ; that is, 
to make them the foremost thing with 
the student body. Marlboro has suc- 
ceeded better than most colleges," he 
added loyally. ' 'Learning arid Labor' is 
its motto; I should put it 'Character and 
Culture' myself. You know President 
Earle's book 'The Fight for Character?' " 

For answer, the other produced it from 
his pocket. 

"I like his 'emphasis on self-control as 
a prime condition of character and of 
happiness and of influence — the chief 
differentiation of the human and sane life 
from the animal and insane life, and a 
root principle of all virtues ! I thought," 
he said in comment, "I could follow a 
man like that. There's a mist or a twist 
in my theology, but I feel pretty sure — 
perhaps too sure — in the realm of ethics. 
And I've always known that Marlboro 
stood for character. It did in my fath- 
er's day. He was a student here in the 
sixties. I expect to find it different, but 
I thought when I read Earle's book, you 
can't get anything higher than that. If 
the leaders of Marlboro are like that, it's 
Marlboro for mine." 

Bayard laughed at the closing touch of 
slang, so solemnly uttered. "You call 
yourself sordid," he protested; "you 
make me feel frivolous. Well, we can 
only be young once. Come back into the 
next car. I've learned there's a girl on 
board that I know, a classmate of mine 
in High School, Ruth Markham. She's 
a very bright girl. We'll all be freshmen 
together in Marlboro, so you ought to 
know her." 

"Is it part of the curriculum?" 

"Sure ! Haven't I been telling you this 
is no monastery. Bring your suit-case 
and come on." 

They passed in the vestibule a youth 
with a suit-case bearing the Marlboro 
pennant and smoking a cigarette. 

"If the tag on his baggage is right, the 
one in his mouth is wrong," remarked 



Bayard, sotto voce ; "he will have to cut 
that out in Marlboro." 

The first coach was also a frothing tor- 
rent of gay youth. College colors flut- 
tered from the racks and were waved in 
the aisle. Snatches of college songs and 
yells filled pauses of laughter-punctuated 
talk. 

Bayard decorously presented his new 
friend to Miss Markham and she intro- 
duced both young men to her seatmate. 
Miss Bond, but soon conventions relaxed 
and the four were engaged in lively chat. 
This was true, at least, of Ruth and Bay- 
ard ; the other two listened more se- 
dately. 

Lyman's preoccupied air piqued Ruth 
Markham. "Mr. Russell," she began de- 
murely, "isn't this a fine day for the 
race?" 

Of course he asked, as she expected, 
"What race?" and she replied mischiev- 
ously, "The human race," whereat the 
other three shouted with the ready laugh- 
ter of foolish youth. 

Ruth was the first to recover herself. 
Seeing that Lyman looked first aston- 
ished and then indignant, she tactfully 
led the conversation into channels which 
she guessed he might find more con- 
genial. 

As evening fell, the girls produced 
lunch boxes and shared with their com- 
panions. The news vendor chancing 
along just then, Bayard treated the com- 
pany to fruit. He would have made an- 
other purchase when the basket of sweets 
reappeared, but Lyman said hastily, "My 
treat now," and pulled out a worn, shab- 
by purse. The girls with quick intuition 
declared that they could not eat another 
thing, and there wasn't time, anyhow. 

Presently came the brakeman's call of 
''Marlboro !" A swirl of confused move- 
ment, and the four found themselves 
surging with scores of others out the 
car doors and down the steps. The sta- 
tion platform, slippery with rain, was 
filled with a welcoming host, who greeted 
the incoming train with a flutter of crim- 
son and gold and the swelling rhythm of 
the deafening chorus — 

"Hi-hi-hi !— Ho-ho-ho ! 
Marlboro-Marlboro— Marlboro!" 

Some of the welcoming group wore 
official badges, being representatives of 
the college Young 



Men's and \oung 



October, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



16: 



Women's Christian Associations. These 
were ready with information and assist- 
ance. Without waiting for them. Bay- 
ard, who knew the place well, took 
charge of his companions. 

"One minute, Russell, and I'll see you 
to your room. Miss Bond and Miss 
Markham, if you'll give me your trunk: 
checks, I'll see that you have your bag- 
gage at the earliest possible moment — 
though that may not be tonight." 

Lyman was standing beside Ruth. He 
had never noticed girls before, and now 
his chief impression of Ruth was an irri- 
tated wish that she would do her hair 
more sensibly ; when he saw her suddenly 
turn white. "I've lost my purse," she 
said faintly. "It had my money for term 
bills — and everything ; a hundred dollars 
in all. Oh, how can I tell Father?" 
(To be continued.) 



THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU 
FREE. 

BY PRESIDENT BLAXCHARD. 

"Ye shall know the truth and the truth shall 
make you free." 

A friend writes me that he has recent- 
ly read an article on the subject of re- 
form work, the sense of which was that 
since Christianity includes all good and 
since no efforts to do good can really 
succeed unless they be Christian, it is 
useless or worse to carry on such work 
as ours. The doctrine is, for substance, 
that we should preach the gospel. Those 
who hold the narrow view of this very 
blessed work, at times seem to feel that 
the sixteenth verse of the third chapter 
of John is about the only text which a 
thoroughly enlightened Christian would 
ever use. Those holding this view are 
accustomed to say that the agitation 
against slavery, against intemperance. 
against Mormonism. against gambling, 
against the social evil and against secret 
societies would accomplish far more if 
the efforts were given directly to the sal- 
vation of men. Get men right on the 
main issue, then they will be right on 
subordinate matters ; preach the gospel 
but do not appeal to the courts : preach 
the gospel but do not strive for laws. 
This is the general doctrine and it is suf- 
ficiently important and sufficiently wide- 
soread to justify a brief discussion. 



Ye Shall Know the Truth. 

But what truth ? It i^ obvious that 
knowing a part of the truth will not free 
one from all error; knowing part of the 
truth will not free one from all bondage ; 
knowing the truth on any subject frees 
one from error and bondage as regards 
the particular matter, but not in regard 
to other things. For example, if I know 
the truth respecting eclipses of the sun 
or moon I will not be in bondage to fear 
when the sky is darkened at midday by 
the interposing moon ; but I may know 
the truth about eclipses, and if I do not 
know the truth about salvation, I may be 
the slave of sin. On the other hand. I 
may know the truth about salvation, but 
it will not necessarily free me from error 
and bondage in regard to economics. If 
I do rot know how men should live in 
order to prosper in regard to their home 
conditions, I may know the truth about 
saivanon and at the same time be in a 
very evil condition as regards my daily 
life. Some men are. There are women 
who are unquestionably saved who are 
miserable housekeepers and there are 
men who are unquestionably saved who 
are miserable home providers. They 
knovv the truth in part, but they do not 
know all the truth. They do not know 
all the truth which they need to know. 
The}' aie free on the subjects respecting 
which they know and hold and live by the 
truth. This is perfectly plain. I do not 
need to illustrate further, any of my 
reader- can easily find a multitude of 
instances exhibiting this fact in their own 
experience. 

The Truth Shall Make You Free. 

k is worth while in the interest of 
clearness to stop a single moment on this 
word "free." Free from what? Many 
ot the slaves in the times when we had 
slavery in this country knew the truth as 
to salvation and the}' received it and be- 
lieved it and were comforted by it. but 
they were not free from bondage. They 
rose at the blowing of the horn, they 
worked under the overseer's lash and 
they lay down at night to sleep in their 
miserable cabins, bondmen, not to Satan. 
but to their fellow-men. In other .words, 
freedom may be partial or complete. The 
only i bsolutelv free being in the universe 
is God. All finite spirits are subject to 
Limitation, that is to restraint, if you 



166 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1912 



allow the term, to bondage. We are 
cramped by our ignorance, by our inabil- 
ities by our surroundings, so we prob- 
ably always shall be. By and by there 
may come a time when we shall be so 
largely free that compared with our pres- 
ent state, we shall seem to be absolutely 
so, but this will be in seeming and in rel- 
ative proportion only. The finite is, by 
its very definition, subject to limitation. 
YA this word was spoken by our Heav- 
enly Father for the benefit of humans 
like ourselves, and therefore its meaning 
should be understood and conditions, as 
far as possible, applied. 

Progressive Detail. 

All men who think a little recognize 
the fact that throughout our whole life 
we are advancing through truths to free- 
doms. When we learn the alphabet it 
sets us free from ignorance; when we 
learn arithmetic another great field is 
open to us through which we may range 
at will ; when we learn the truth respect- 
ing the earth or the stars or the flowers 
or the elements, page after page, volume 
after volume, territory after territory 
becomes ours. So when we gain the vic- 
tory over vanities, envies, jealousies, am- 
bitions, sensualities, prides, selfishnesses 
of every kind, we are learning truths con- 
tinually and continually we are advancing 
in liberties. The walls that hemmed us 
in recede; the tilings which we did caus- 
ing regret, remorse and shame we do not 
do; the tilings that we struggled for un- 
availingly become easy ; so continually 
learning truths, continually we are being 
made free. 

The Case in Hand. 

Xow to the case in hand. Those of us 
who feel compelled to sacrifice time and 
money and reputation and friends and 
things for great causes which have to do 
with the honor of God and the interest 
of men, are reproved, rebuked and ex- 
horted to preoch the gospel and to let the 
potsherds strive with the potsherds of 
the earth. We are told, as already noted 
above, that if we can get men right, 
everything will come right, that until we 
get men right, nothing is really accom- 
plished, therefore we should cease our 
efforts against slavery, against intemper- 
ance, against lodgism, against political 
corruption. Let those who see these evils 
and regard them but who do not know 



the all-compelling evil of sin, attend to 
these matters, but let us who are enlight- 
ened legarding the fundamental charac- 
ter of spiritual things attend to spiritual 
things alone. This is the argument ; in 
the light of what has been said above, is it 
sound? We think not, and we rest for 
our conclusion on the reason of the case 
and on the facts in the case. 

In the first place, we have differing du- 
ties ; we are persons, members of family 
circles, citizens in the community, mem- 
bers of the body of Christ. In each of 
these departments of our life we have 
differing obligations. Respecting the 
rights and wrongs of each of these sec- 
tions of our being we need to know the 
truth. Knowing what I ought to do re- 
specting breathing pure air, taking care 
of my food and drink and clothes will 
not instruct me as to my duties as hus- 
band, father, son or daughter. To be 
sure, I must keep myself in good condi- 
tion if I am to perform my duties in the 
home, but I need to know what they are 
and I shall not know intuitively. I must 
learn, and some of the things I must learn 
by thinking and others by teaching, and 
as fast as I know the truth, the truth will 
make me free. So if I am to be a citizen, 
if I am to have the protection of civil 
government, according to Romans thir- 
teen, I must recognize my obligations to 
the governor. He is a minister of God 
to me for good just as a blacksmith is 
my helper for the shoeing of my horse, or 
the Bible teacher is my minister for the 
enlightening of my soul. It seems ob- 
vious that if I am to do my duty as a 
Christian in the various relations which 
I sustain, it is right that some one should 
tell me what those duties are. God, by 
His Holy Spirit, speaks to us directly. 
The Bible is full of direction, but among 
its directions are that we should hate 
evil and love the good ; and we are told 
that those who do the truth love the light, 
and those who do evil love the darkness. 

And There Are Others. 

We are' not solitary beings, but social. 
We do not live alone, we live in com- 
munities, and while we are responsible 
for ourselves we are, according to the 
measure of our power and relations 
which we sustain, responsible for others. 
I am responsible for my children. If I 
am a teacher I am responsible for my 



October, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



167 



pupils : if I am a civil official I am re- 
sponsible for those over whom I am 
called to rule ; if I have influence I am 
responsible for those who are to be af- 
fected by that influence. Xo man has a 
right to isolate himself from his fellows. 
Jesus did not do it, He was contrasted 
with John to his discredit by certain ig- 
norant religionists of His day. They 
said, "this man is a wine bibber and a 
glutton" because he lived as men did 
among men and did not separate himself 
from others as the recluses of His time 
and of all ages did, and so we are to live 
and in these differing relations we are to 
perform our duties, and the Christian 
teacher is not discharged from his obli- 
gations when he says to men, "You must 
be right and do right," but he is also un- 
der obligation to say to them what right 
is. Not as lords over their faith, but as 
workers together with God. 

The Facts in the Case Are Overwhelming. 

Here was slavery ; for the sake of 
clearness, let us contrast two ages, 
slavery in the time of the Caesars and 
slavery in the United States in 1850. In 
the time of the Caesars the Christian faith 
was struggling for its very life, churches 
had not been established, there were no 
schools, the overwhelming majority of 
the human race knew nothing about read- 
ing or writing. All power was in the 
hand? of the few, the masses of men 
could do nothing but labor and suffer. 
It is obvious that at such a time the little 
flock of persecuted people had no large 
responsibility for the improvement of 
such conditions among men. In 1850 
and in our own country the conditions 
were different. The hundred years' 
struggle which the Puritans had with the 
Stuarts had ended in the beheading of 
the king and the triumph of the people. 
Our fathers had inherited that long 
struggle and its resulting free institu- 
tions. Churches were planted every- 
where and, strange to us, these churches 
had become infected with the virus of 
human bondage. Ministers, bishops, 
members of churches bought and sold 
and whipped and branded and starved 
and worked without wages men and 
women and children quite as good as 
themselves, in many instances far better. 
Xow this state of things called for a 
radically different attitude on the part of 



a Christian believer. It was idle to ask 
people who were committing these crimes 
to become believers, they said they were 
believers already. It was of no use to 
quote John 3:16, they believed them- 
selves to be living in John 3:16, at least 
they said that they believed themselves 
to be thus living. What they needed was 
consciences that should show them the 
iniquity of professing to love God while 
they were oppressing men. Even at this 
time, 1 91 2, nearly fifty years since the 
abolition of slavery, there are certain 
people who still justify that sum of all 
villainies and the»e people call themselves 
Christian and feel offended if other peo- 
ple question their Christian character. 
One who knows how a single wrong en- 
shrined in a church corrupts and infects 
even*thing which it says and does, does 
not need to be told what moral degrada- 
tion ensued from the ignorance of the 
truth on the part of persons otherwise 
well meaning in the times of American 
slavery. 

So About the Whisky Traffic. 

In the memory of men and women yet 
living distilleries and breweries were 
owned by officers and members of the 
Christian church. Men have been seen 
to distribute the tokens of Christ's slain 
body in the church and to hurry home 
that they might deal out intoxicating 
drinks to their fellow church members 
as they were going home. I speak of this 
as if it were past. Everyone knows that 
it is not altogether past, though it should 
be. A large share of the stock in English 
breweries and distilleries is today -owned 
by officers of the church. The miseries 
and crimes and degredations and hope- 
lessness and despairs and murders and 
suicides and pauper graves which come 
out from the liquor trade in Great Brit- 
ain are, in large measure, to be laid fairly 
and squarely at the door of the church 
today. This is not ancient history, this 
is current events. The same thing was 
true in this country. Thank God. it i- 
generally changed, yet here and there are 
lingering relics of this abominable con- 
dition. But while personally and socially 
our people have been largely freed from 
this iniquitous system, politically the 
masses of them are identified with it to- 
day. Stop one hundred voting church 
members in the street todav and it is 



168 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1912. 



safe to say that ninety of them are ex- 
pecting within sixty days to vote for 
political organizations which have bar- 
gained with the liquor business. It seems 
to be clearly proved that one of the great 
political organizations of our country has 
made a contract with the Mormon power 
by which, in return for certain votes duly 
delivered, certain political powers are to 
be conferred. The Republicans seem to 
have made this bargain directly in words 
through Mr. Hanna or his representa- 
tives at the time when Mr. McKinley 
wished to be elected for the second time. 
Mr. McKinley was a very pleasant man 
in his home, he was in many respects a 
model, but politically he was in league 
with the liquor trade and Senator Hanna 
for him made a contract, as is reported, 
with the Mormon power. Now was this 
according to the truth, and ought Chris- 
tian ministers and members of churches 
to identify themselves with organizations 
of this kind? 

Just So About the Lodges. 

Lodge men are claiming now several 
hundred different sorts of lodges in this 
country and are alleging that these sev- 
eral hundred different sorts of lodges 
have in them about twelve millions of 
members. These members are men, 
women and even children. In our time, 
in order to serve the lodge movement, 
they are extending their membership 
among children and women as diligently 
as possible. These twelve millions, more 
or less, of men, women and children at- 
tend lodge meetings, held usually at 
night. The home, which ought to have in 
it a complete home circle, usually is scat- 
tered and divided ; fathers are in one 
lodge, mothers are in another, older chil- 
dren are in a third, and babies cry alone 
at home. This is not invariable, some- 
times fathers and mothers are in the 
same lodge, but the home is disrupted. 
Fathers and mothers ought to be with 
their children at night. Children have 
rights which even white men are bound 
to respect, and fathers and mothers who 
neglect and wrong their children by rob- 
bing them of companionship will pay a 
heavy price before they are through. 
This Is Enough but Not All. 

If this were the only objection to se- 
cret societies, it would be sufficient for 



thoughtful men who have known the 
truth and been made free, but we all 
know that this is only the beginning ob- 
jection to these orders. They are not 
simply rivals of the home, they are ene- 
mies of the gospel and of the church 
which preaches it. They declare that 
men can be saved by works and that they 
cannot be saved by faith in Christ alone. 
You can scarcely speak to the average 
lodge man or woman without seeing the 
countenance light up as the person re- 
plies, "If one lives according to the teach- 
ings of our lodge, he will be a very good 
man.'' The form of statement varies* 
some will say, "he will be a Christian." 
Some Freemasons even, who ought to 
know that Freemasonry is a deadly ene- 
my of Christ and Christianity, tell us that 
if a man is a Freemason, he must be a 
Christain. Not content with destroying 
the home and the church these twelve 
millions of lodge people, ignorant, in 
large part, let us gladly say, are also do- 
ing what in them lies to destroy civil gov- 
ernment. They have put ignorant, unau- 
thorized people to administering oaths 
until the oath has largely lost its signifi- 
cance to the average American. A man 
with a half dozen lodge oaths on his con- 
science is not to be expected to know 
what an oath means. Any judge or com- 
petent lawyer will tell you today that per- 
juries are horribly common in our courts. 
Why not, when a multitude of oaths, in 
many instances conflicting, are sworn by 
one individual? Which oath is he to 
keep and how is any oath to be sacred to 
him ? 

The Rulers and the Chief Priests Crucified 
Him. 
All this would be bad enough if the 
system were in the hands of confessed 
unbelievers, but everyone knows that this 
lodge system is very largely in the hands 
of professed Christians ; ministers, bish- 
ops and members of churches have 
united with these organizations. It is 
true that spiritual minded people among 
them do not go very frequently to the 
meetings, but they are known to be mem- 
bers, and what influence they have is 
used to sustain and extend these organi- 
zations. Money by tens of millions, and 
people by millions are drawn away from 
homtes and churches to contribute to> 
these synagogues of Satan, these altars 



October, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



169 



•of Baal. Can we fully perform our duty 
if we preach to these professed Chris- 
tians that they should believe on the Lord 
Jesus Christ that they may be saved? 
They profess to believe in Him now : 
there are numbers of them officers in His 
church. If you ask them to become 
Christians they feel insulted ; they say. 
"We are Christians already, just as good 
as you are," but if you say to them, "Did 
you swear under penalty of having your 
throat cut across, your tongue torn out. 
your vitals removed, your body cut in 
two, the top of your skull smitten off," 
or questions of this kind, they say, "That 
is none of your business, that is a private 
matter ; there is nothing in our lodge 
which is against my Christian faith, our 
lodge is all founded on the Bible." This 
is the way these people talk to you. Un- 



questionably the Christian church owes 
a duty to these people; some of them are 
intelligent and wicked, others of them are 
honest and ignorant, but all of them need 
testimony to the truth. Christians who 
have the truth are bound to speak it ; 
Christians who have the light are bound 
to let it shine. They have no right to re- 
hearse platitudes and self-evident truths 
while men by millions are being de- 
stroyed. This is the reason why we 
should not preach the gospel in any nar- 
row, pieayunish sense. Preach the gos- 
pel, of course, but preach it fully, teach 
the main truth certainly, but teach other 
truth also as far as men need it. and it is 
in our possession. In this way only will 
men come to know the truth and to be by 
the truth made free. 
VVheaton College. 





r j£Tt£ grtflitxi jieat 




<£ 


.Samuel tj. <5recnc 






From the personal reminiscences by Samuel D. Greene of the abduction and mur- 
der of Captain William Morgan were taken some of the facts so vividly brought out in 
Miss Flagg's "Power of the Secret Empire," which ended in the December number of 
the CYNOSURE. The story has created so wide an interest that we propose to .give our 
readers in the next few months some of these facts as recorded by Mr. Greene, an eye- 
witness. — Editor. 



CHAPTER IX— CONTINUED. 

When the time came for the session of 
the court in March, I appeared at Tol- 
land, and gave myself up to the proper 
authorities, and was locked up in jail to 
await the coming on of the case. During 
the first night I was in jail, the wife of 
the jailer came into the prison, and spoke 
to me in a low voice, through the grate, 
asking if my name was Greene, and then 
telling me that they were plotting to take 
me out of prison and carry me off. When 
this intelligence reached me. it was so 
much like Western Xew York, four 
years before, that I could not fail to un- 
derstand the meaning of the transaction. 
Through her I had intelligence at once 
conveyed to Elisha Stearns, Esq.. my 
lawyer, living in Tolland, to come and 
take me out of jail on a writ of habeas 
corpus. Accordingly, he came, and in 
the earlv morning I was taken out of jail. 



I was prepared to make a legal defense 
against the claim brought against me on 
the writ by which I was first arrested : 
but so decidedly illegal and disorderly 
had the whole proceeding been, "and so 
evident was it that the affair was merely 
a masonic persecution, that my counsel 
thought best to put in a plea of abate- 
ment. The forms and documents used 
against me were vitally deficient. 

To show how this had come about, it is 
necessary to go back a little and explain. 
This suit was begun by Benjamin Sals- 
bury, of Stafford, Ct. A note, which I 
had given many years before, in 1816, in 
Pembroke. N. Y., had come into the 
hands of Salsbury through his wife. The 
note was for thirty-eight dollars, and had 
been settled. I had the receipt for it ; 
but somehow the note had been over- 
looked, and had not been given up or 
destroyed. Salsbury expected to find me 



17ii 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1912. 



at New London, where he knew I had an 
appointment to speak. Accordingly, he 
went to New London, and had the writ 
drawn there, and directed to the sheriff 
of Xew London County. Then he heard 
that I had turned off to Hebron, and was 
not coming to Xew London directly from 
Norwich, as he had supposed. Not wish- 
ing to lose time, and being eagerly bent 
on working out his masonic hatred, he 
came up to overtake me at Hebron. The 
town of Hebron is in Tolland County, 
and the sheriff of New London could not 
execute the writ. So Mr. Salsbury stops 
at Colchester, the neighboring town to 
Hebron, and gets A. D. Scovil, Esq., to 
empower Newell Taintor to make the 
arrest. 

Here was the fatal defect in the writ. 
In this transfer of authority none of the 
rules had been observed which were re- 
quired, in such cases, by the laws of Con- 
necticut. We need not attempt to specify 
all the points wherein the papers were 
deficient. But they were openly and ob- 
viously so to every legal mind. They 
had been prepared not with legal calm- 
ness, but in the hurry of masonic hatred, 
which could not wait to comply with little 
forms. My counsel, therefore, moved a 
plea of abatement. Something like this 
result was a kind of legal necessity from 
the premises. Yet, notwithstanding these 
fatal defects, so strong was the masonic 
zeal animating the lawyers on the other 
side, the judges, etc., that there was still 
a manifest disposition to press on with 
the case. My lawyer, seeing the tenden- 
cies, thought the safest way, therefore, 
was to move that the case be erased from 
the docket ; for, in truth, there was no 
case. The writ had not been served (in 
the technical sense). 

Even in this state of things, one of the 
lawyers on the other side had the au- 
dacity to move that I should be called, 
and should be defaulted. When my law- 
yer saw what Masonry would dare to 
attempt to do in a court of justice — for 
he had never before so clearly discovered 
i f s character — he rose and said with earn- 
estness, "What ! oblige us to answer or 
be defaulted, and have judgment ren- 
dered against us without any precept (or 
writ), and when we have a just legal de- 
fense, too! Render judgment upon your 
peril/' 



Tne court could not have the face to 
go farther in this direction, and the case 
was quashed. Then came the time for 
the other side to look after its interests. 
Those concerned in the case wished to 
come to a settlement with me. I had it 
in my power to make them suffer; that is, 
if justice could be obtained through the 
courts, which was doubtful. However, 
not being disposed to render evil for evil, 
I made a settlement with the parties, and 
the following is the receipt, word for 
word, which 1 gave on that occasion : 

"Received of Benjamin Salsbury, Jr., 
Newell Taintor, Amherst D. Scovil, Esq., 
and Ephraim Hyde, by the hand of the 
said Benjamin Salsbury, Jr., sixty-nine 
dollars and fifty cents ; and in consider- 
ation thereof, I do hereby release and 
discharge them, and either of them, and 
all others acting by or under the direc- 
tion and authority of them or any of 
them, from all manner of action or 
actions, cause or causes of action, claim 
or claims, and demands, which I ever 
had or now have against them or either 
of them, or against any other person 
or persons acting for and in their behalf, 
or under their authority, or either of 
them, for any assault and battery and 
false imprisonment committed on me by 
them or either of them, or by any other 
person or persons. acting in their behalf 
or under their direction or authority, or 
'either of them, up to this date. In wit- 
ness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and seal, at Tolland, this twenty- 
seventh day of March, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty. 

"(Seal) Saml. D. Greene. 

"Attest: 

"Elisha Stearns, 
"Aholiab Johnson.'' 

I was employed in those years, not 
only as a lecturer, but also as an editor 
and publisher. In 1827 I had charge of 
the Masonic Investigator, published at 
Batavia, and which continued for some 
years, until the masonic trials were end- 
ed. In this paper was gathered up al- 
most all the anti-masonic literature of 
those early years. 

In 1830 I took charge of the Anti-Ma- 
sonic Christian Herald, in the city of 
Boston. This paper was designed to be 
a religious newspaper, with a special 



October, 1912 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



171 



guardianship and support of the anti- 
masonic cause. I kept my connection 
with this paper until 1835. One of my 
sons, who was very young then, but who 
served as a carrier to deliver the papers 
to subscribers in one section of the city 
limits, remembers to this day how full- 
grown men used to send their provoking 
remarks at him ; and some of them for- 
bade their children to play with him, 
because his fatner edited and delivered 
an anti-masonic paper. 

As already stated, many other facts 
might be given illustrating the hostility 
which I everywhere, encountered among 
those who still held fast to the masonic 
institution ; but 1 will not prolong the 
narrative by their recital. A man in my 
position during those years need not be 
surprised, when he undertook to lecture 
against Masonry, to find himself in the 
midst of a mob, and to receive a salute 
of eggs, brickbats, and other convenient 
missiles. 

However, the work went on gloriously 
in spite of all opposition. There was a 
great satisfaction in helping forward the 
movement. The anti-masonic cause 
gained ground with rapid strides. There 
was an uprising of the people against the 
haughty assumptions of Masonry, such 
as was no longer to be trifled with. It 
was a question of mighty import, wheth- 
er a free people was to be ruled by a set 
of Freemasons working in the dark — 
concocting their schemes in the seclusion 
of the lodge-room — whether "justice 
was to be turned away backward" by 
the arts and contrivances of a set of men 
who were bound together by secret oaths 
of the most impious and shameful char- 
acter. The work went on, year after 
year, until Masonry was an utterly dis- 
honored institution in this free land. 
The great body of those who had taken 
its oaths had either publicly seceded, or 
had ceased to attend upon its meetings. 
States came forward and passed laws 
forbidding extrajudicial oaths. The 
charters of the lodges, in a majority of 
cases, were returned, and the lodges ut- 
terly broken up. Not many years ago, 
in the State of Massachusetts, only five 
masonic lodges remained out of some 
five hundred. The institution was be- 
lieved to be dying, and as far as any out- 



side influence was concerned, was prac- 
tically dead. 

But of late years Masonry is growing 
again, and that rapidly. During the 
fierce anti-slavery excitement through 
which the land has been passing, the dis- 
honored institution again saw its chance 
to rise and spread. The public mind had 
become thoroughly absorbed with other 
interests. Masonry embraced its oppor- 
tunity. Little by little it has been forti- 
fying itself in the dark, gathering in its 
numbers, until, now and then, it makes 
some outward demonstration calculated 
to impress the world with its great 
strength. A day like that in Boston, 
a few years ago, when the new Masonic 
Temple was finished and dedicated, and 
when President Johnson was invited on 
from Washington to grace the occasion 
with his august presence, was fitted to 
make men thoughtful with reference to 
the growing power of this institution. 
Masonry showed a great procession on 
that day. The sight was anything but 
pleasing to one who remembers the past. 
and who knows the mischievous and cor- 
rupting power of the order. 

But for all this, Masonry is not yet 
back again where it was in 1826. As 
compared with her presence and influ- 
ence then, she is even now a dishonored 
institution. The class of men who were 
then prominent in her councils are no 
longer in her councils at all, and cannot 
be drawn there at present. They are 
shy of all approaches looking to such a 
connection. The history of Masonry, in 
this respect, has been a little like the 
history of intemperance. The drinking 
habits of society, as they were forty 
years ago, have been dishonored and 
abolished. There is plenty of hard 
drinking now ; perhaps it is on the in- 
crease. There are multitudes of men in. 
our cities and towns who call themselves 
very respectable, and who use wine and 
strong drink freely themselves, and offer 
it to their guests. But the great body 
of truly religious and strictly moral peo- 
ple, throughout the land, do not do this. 
though they once did it. It may be pos- 
sible to prove that there is more spirits 
used now than there was forty years 
ago; but it is not possible to prove that 
drinking is as reputable now as it was 



CHRISTIAN" CYNOSURE. 



October. 1912. 



forty years ago, or that the same classes 
of people give themselves up to it. 

So with Masonry. The institution is 
not yet reinstated. It does not hold its 
old place in the public estimation. For- 
merly Masonry drew its active support- 
ers from the ministers, deacons and 
members of every denomination of 
Christians. Now it is comparatively rare 
to rind church members, and especially 
ministers of certain of cur religious de- 
nominations, in its ranks. We do no' L 
know precisely how the case stands in 
the Congregational churches, but of the 
more than three thousand ministers of 
that order in the land, we will venture 
the guess that not so many as one in a 
hundred is a Mason. 

There is one large and growing de- 
nomination of Christians in this country 
where we are sorry to see a different 
tendency prevailing. We hear it said 
that the ministers of this denomination, 
in large numbers, have connected them- 
selves with masonic lodges within a few 
years. Their initiatory fees are paid by 
others, as an inducement for them to 
come in. After all the light which has 
been shed on Masonry in these latter 
days, and when one considers how all sa- 
cred and divine things are turned to 
sport in the masonic literature, how any 
minister of the gospel can think himself 
in the way of duty by confabulating with 
Masons is more than we can understand. 
We believe the plea commonly urged is 
that it will give them greater facilities 
for usefulness. But this is "going down 
into Egypt for help" with a vengeance. 
We should as soon think of joining some 
drinking club, in order to gain the means 
of preaching the gospel more effectually. 
as to join with the Masons. It is very 
certain that no denomination of Chris- 
tians can stand the moral influence of 
such a connection a great while, without 
the most serious inroads upon its piety. 

Masonry is not back where it was in 
1826, but it is gaining - strength in a way 
that is alarming. The foundations of 
great public structures have to be laid 
"with imposing masonic ceremonies." 
and in numerous ways it is manifest that 
the institution is on the watch to extend 
itself on every side. 

I am an old man. and I shall soon be 
gene. But I leave it as my last injunc- 



tion to my countrymen, that thev watch 
this institution with a jealous eve. It is 
an old enemy to their liberties. It has 
no thought of the general good. It is not 
founded and worked upon any such idea. 
It is built upon the principle of tyranny 
in all ages, "the good of the few at the 
expense of the many." Whenever and 
wherever Masonry is asserting her 
claims, and pushing herself forward, one 
may be perfectly sure that such are her 
secret purposes and aims. 
( End. ) 



"THE RELATION OF THE CHURCH 

AND THE MINISTER TO THE 

LODGE." 

BY REV. W. BRENNER, MARTIN LUTHER 

ENGLISH LUTHERAN CHURCH 
I GENERAL COUNCIL ) . 
Thesis I. 
The Church and the Lodge are two 

institutions, not only distinct and sep- 
arate from each other, but in many re- 
spects contrary the one to the other in 
character, teaching and tendency. 
Thesis II. 

The Church is divine in its origin 111 a 
unique sense, differentiating it from all 
other movements in human history, and 
making it grandly superior to all other 
institutions in the "world. The Lodge is 
human in its genesis. Whatever of the 
mysterious and supernatural operated 
in its creation certainly cannot claim to 
be divine. 

Thesis III. 

God has entrusted to His church cer- 
tain privileges, duties and responsibili- 
ties with which no one dare interfere, or 
arrogate and claim for himself either in 
full or in part. 

Thesis IV. 

To such privileges and responsibilities 
of the Church belong properly the burial. 
with certain fitting and duly prescribed 
ceremonies, of all those members of the 
Christian Church who have departed this 
life in Christian faith and hope. 
Thesis V. 

To offer its services or to insist upon 
performing its own unchristian rites pre- 
vious to, or following the services ren- 
dered by a regularly ordained minister 
of the Church over the remains of the 
departed is an undue interference and an 



October. 191: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



unrighteous and unwarranted impeach- 
ment oi. and calling in question of the 
completeness of. the liturgy of the 
Church : it is an infrigement of its rights 
and an intermeddling wholly unjustifi- 
able, and is therefore to be positively 
declined and resisted. 

Thesis VI. 
Every Lutheran minister should not 
permit but use every possible means to 
prevent the lodge from attending the 
funeral in a body ; not tolerate any pa- 
rading with music and regalia : not 
acquiesce in. or in silence consent to their 
performing any religious exercises be- 
fore or after the ceremonies of his own 
church, because it detracts from the dig- 
nity and importance of the Church's 
liturgy, diminishes reverent attention 
thereto ; and all the features and inci- 
dents connected with their pompous and 
'frivolous ways make it, and not the 
Church of Jesus Christ and God's ever- 
lasting Gospel the central figure and ob- 
ject oi the occasion: and because it con- 
tributes to the idea already too common 
that the secret society is the ally of the 
Church, an important adjunct of the 
same and that such an organization, if it 
has a ritual, is all that is needed and the 
Church becomes in the eyes and estima- 
tion of many people a non-essential and 
negligible factor. 

Thesis VII. 
Every Christian or disciple of Christ, 
and especially every minister of the 
Church is invested with the duty of wit- 
nessing unreservedly and unequivocally 
to the truth and against falsehood. This 
duty he is to hold sacred and inviolable 
and to perform so conscientiously and 
persistently as to allow no questions of 
policy or expediency, temporal honor or 
worldly advantage, gain or fame, to in- 
fluence him to ignore or disregard it in 
any way at any time, or in any place. 

Thesis VIII. 
A correct and common conception of 
the true character of the lodge and the 
observance of stricter and better rules 
with reference to their presence and offi- 
cial activity on funeral occasions, where 
Lutheran pastors are called upon to offi- 
ciate would remove one of the great ob- 
stacles to Lutheran courtesy and co- 
operation. We are to strive earnestly for 



the best way and use every power and 
put forth every effort to promote unity 
of spirit and harmony of action among 
t!i. se who are of the household of faith. 
Could we reach the same conclusion and 
pursue the same course, the wisdom and 
value oi it would soon manifest itself in 
the increased beauty and power of 
churches, the greater respect and ad- 
miration of the outside world and a 
stronger and better attachment devo- 
tion, faith and Christian activity on the 
part of all our church members. 



SISTER LIZZIE REE. 

Right good at cards, she wins the prize 

At many a game of euchre : 

And trim and fair, she holds the eyes 

Of the young and gay onlooker. 

Who seeks a partner at the dance. 

A partner who can please him. 

Can hold him with bewitching- glance. 

Or in good humor tease him. 

O, she's as busy as a bee. 

This lively Sister Lizzie Ree. 

Her husband, he's a good, kind man : 

At right he never budges. 

But stays at home so Lizzie can 

Go off to all the lodges. 

They say she's very gifted there 

In general conversation ; 

Her lively speeches would compare 

With the preacher's best oration.- 

She is a high up '"Star" you see. 

This comely Sister Lizzie Ree. 

She's Matron this, and Lady that: 

A Grand Star, if you olease ; 

The head beneath her spacious ha: 

Is full of mysteries. 

"The church is quite behind the times 

With modern thought at war" : 

Yet once a year her beauty shines 

At the annual church bazaar. 

The deacons they do all agree. 

"We need no more like Lizzie Ree." 

A. Thoms. x. 



"Who can bring a clean thing out of 
an unclean?" "Doth the fountain send 
forth from the same opening sweet 
water and bitter?" "Xeither can a cor- 
rupt tree bring forth good fruit." 

Are men to be taught morals by the 
very same vicious guide that lures them 
into swearing to keep wicked seen s 
criminals and to extricate them from 
consequences of crimes : 



O ye sons of men. how long will ye 

turn my glory into shame ? How long 
will ye love vanitv ? i Ps. 4 : 2. | 



174 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 1912. 



THE NATIONAL CONVENTION. 
EXCLUDING SECRETISTS. 

13 Y REV. WM. DILLON, D. D. 

Stenographic report of address before the 
National Christian Association in the Second 
United Presbyterian Church, May 23d and 
24th, 1912. 

Mr. President : I propose to speak to 
you on the scriptural authority tor ex- 
cluding secret lodge members from the 
Christian Church. I controverted with 
Bishop Hargrave of the Southern Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church which separated 
in 1846 from the Methodist Episcopal 
Church North, on the subject of slavery, 
and the great number of ministers which 
composed that church held the view that 
slavery was a divine institution ; but God 
Almighty came and swept it out of ex- 
istence. Bishop Hargrave told me that 
he owned a slave when he was a minis- 
ter, and that the slave was a keen, snarp 
man, and that he expected him to make 
money, but he always gave a share of 
the money to him. A system of iniquity, 
of wrong, that John Wesley said was 
the sum of all villainies ; and I lived in 
a day when slavery was better en- 
trenched in this country than secrecy is 
now. God Almighty swept it out of ex- 
istence, and I believe that God Almighty 
will sweep the secret lodge system out 
of existence and I hope to live until he 
does it. 

It seems to me it will give a great 
approach toward the millenium when 
the lodge is swept out of existence. 

Xow while the opinions of men are 
valuable, Trumbull uttered a great truth 
when he said that every man's opinion is 
equal to his intelligence and interest ; 
his intelligence to know the facts, and his 
interest to express it, but God Almighty's 
opinion and judgment is invaluable; it 
is always true. Xow if we can get at 
the opinion of God Almighty in respect 
to the secret lodge system we will have 
an unalterable privilege, and I think we 
can. 

First of all. there are two definitely 
organized secret lodges named in the 
Bible, and the}' were analogous to the 
orders, some of them, but not quite as 
b?d as the orders we have at the present 
time. The secret orders, the orders of 
the Adonis, called Tamnmz, is named in 



the eighth chapter of Ezekiel, and the 
Lord says, or Ezekiel says that God 
Almighty took him by the hair of the 
head, and transported Him to Jerusalem ; 
and there was over on the north side 
of the Temple an addition, and there 
was a little hole in it, and God Almighty 
told him to make that hole bigger so that 
he could get in. He got in there, and 
there were seventy elders of Israel with 
the images of jealousy painted in the 
wall, idolatry, the worship of Tammuz, 
or in our classical Cyclopedias, of Adon- 
is or Tammuz. You notice in that state- 
ment it says, women weeping, several 
times — in the fourteenth verse. What 
does that mean? To what does that 
allude ? The legend was that Adonis 
was killed by a wild boar. That he was 
greatly admired by Venus and also by 
.Mercury, and they lamented his deitn 
for a day and then claimed he had risen 
from the dead and rejoiced the next day, 
and so it is women weeping for Tammuz 
or Adonis. 

Xow what does God Almighty say of 
that secret order called Tamrrmz or 
Adonis? God Almighty says it w?s an 
abomination, and then he showed them 
greater abominations. He took him in 
further and found the twenty- four 
elders of Israel with their backs to the 
temple, and their faces toward the East, 
looking for light in the East, and God 
Almighty denounced it, and placed it as 
a tremendous abomination in the city. 

There you get God's opinion of the 
secret order. It was a regularly organ- 
ized secret society, and God loathed it 
and hated it, and that is the mystery to 
which Paul alludes in ttie fifth chapter 
of Ephesians, where he says "have no 
fellowship with the unfruitful works of 
darkness, but rather reprove them ; for it 
is a shame even to speak of those things 
which are done of them in secret." 

Now you can go to Rollins' Ancient 
History and there you have a description 
of the Eleusinian mysteries. The candi- 
dates were initiated in the dark, through 
thunderings and signs and wonderful 
manifestations, and you notice Pauls 
inspired notes telling them "to have no 
fellowship with the unfruitful works of 
darkness, but rather reprove them." 
You can have no fellowship with them 
by not saying anything, but then you are 



October, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



required to reprove them (the Greek 
word means expose), to show their in- 
iquity. When you do that and persuade 
men to do that, you turn them against 
secret societies. 

If you would take the Methodist 
preacher of Huntington, Ind., or the Rev. 
Mr. Cole of the Campbellite or Christian 
Church, who says he is a Mason and 
initiate him publicly his audience would 
never hear him preach again. Take him 
before his audience and go through with 
the Entered Apprentice Degree, the Fel- 
low Craft and the Master Mason, and it 
would shame him forever — cabletowed, 
exposing his left breast to the point of 
the needle, a slipper on one foot and a 
hoodwink about his eyes. 

Mackey says the Masonic lodge has 
existed for centuries as a secret society ; 
he says it could not exist as many years 
if it was an open society. I believe that 
people do not know how bad it is. 

I have said that the secret lodge sys- 
tem is Satan's masterpiece. I believe it. 
I believe that the Devil will never look 
for a better thing to deceive men than 
these orders. Why? Because it leads 
them, without a full knowledge of the 
fact, to reject Jesus Christ. 

Xow I have told Odd Fellows, "You 
reject Jesus Christ in your lodge rela- 
tion." Jesus Christ is excluded from the 
prayers of every degree of Odd Fellow- 
ship, even the Rebekah Degree for wom- 
en. I met the grand secretary of the 
grand lodge of Ohio in Springfield, 
Ohio ; his home is in Columbus, Ohio. 
I said if a case would come up on appeal 
to your lodge, your grand lodge, the Odd 
Fellows, of which you are secretary, as 
to whether it was lawful to use the name 
of Jesus Christ in prayer in Odd Fel- 
lows, how would you decide it? He 
said, "Rule Christ out." Can you go 
where Jesus Christ is excluded? 

Take the name of Jesus with you, 

Child of sorrow and of woe; 
It will jov and comfort give vou ; 



Take it, then, where'er vou 



go. 



But when you go into a lodge of Odd 
Fellows you go where He is shut out, 
and their grand lodge has so decided, 
and the man who will go into an organi- 
zation where Jesus' name cannot be used 
in prayer, is a mean man. whether you 



think so or not. It is so, and more than 
that, the prayer without the name of 
Christ is of no effect. 1 had rather go 
out when the lightning is Hashing through 
the skies and take a steel point and point 
it at the lightning's flash than to go to 
God Almighty any other way than in 
the name of Jesus Christ. There is no 
access to Him. "No man cometh to the 
Father but by me." "If you ask any- 
thing in my name 1 will give it." Now 
when a society deliberately, intentionally, 
purposely strikes out the name of Jesus 
and refuses to have it used in prayer in 
their lodge, it is not only mockery, but 
let me tell you it is more than that. Pres- 
ident Jonathan Blanchard enlightened 
me some years ago ; it is devil worship, 
that is just what it is, I say, and I am 
ready to stand by it, that all lodge wor- 
ship is devil worship, and I can prove 
it. "Well," you say, "do it." I will do 
it. Paul says in writing to the Corin- 
thians, "The things which the Gentiles 
sacrifice they sacrifice to devils, and not 
to God." Now suppose he had told a 
Gentile, "You worship the devil." He 
would have answered, "Why no, I wor- 
ship Serus the god of grain, and Pomona 
the god of fruit, and Flora the god of 
Mowers." Paul says all that is not the 
true worship of God Almighty, and none 
is but that in the name of Jesus, is devil 
worship, and so all lodge worship is devil 
worship. Do you hear me? When a 
man goes and worships a devil in a lodge 
I don't want him to come into my church 
and worship, until he repents of it : we 
have a mourner's bench in our church, 
and I want him to go down there and get 
down humbly and acknowledge his sin 
before I will fellowship with him. 

There is another way to determine, 
and that is by statements in the Bible. 
Jesus said, "He that doeth the truth 
cometh to the light. 

"For every one that doeth evil hateth 
the light, neither cometh to the light, lest 
his deeds should be reproved." 

What is light? Paul tells us in the 
fifth chapter of Ephesians. He says 
"Whatsoever maketh manifest is light." 
So if this room was perfectly dark, I 
could not see you — the lights turned on 
make you manifest. Whatever makes 
manifest is light. Or reverse that, what- 
ever conceals is darkness. Does the 



L70 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1912. 



lodge conceal ? Y es, they pledge them- 
selves always to conceal and never reveal 
any part or parts of their mysteries in 
ancient Freemasonry. They have gotten 
up one lately in the West for farmers, 
and there is the regular pledge of con- 
cealment in all these lodges, and what- 
ever conceals is darkness. The lodge 
is darkness, and include their first two 
lines and then it is selfishness. There is 
no charity in any of the lodges. Some 
men may be members of the lodges who 
do works of charity incidentally, but by 
the arrangement of the lodges there is no 
one item of charity in the whole lodge 
system. Why should there be ? There 
are lodges in this country that do not 
return to their members on the whole 
an average of quite one-third of what 
they put in. You can put in three dol- 
lars and they will pay you nearly one 
dollar back, and I heard Brother Stod- 
dard say he would do better than that, 
he would give them half back — and then 
you see thev call that charity, to give 
you one-third back of what you put in. 
If I would put three thousand dollars in 
the First National Bank of Huntington, 
and they would give me back one thou- 
sand and keep the other two, would 
I count that charity? Xo. There 
is not an atom of charity in the lodge, 
in any lodge in the land. They are the 
consolidated essence of selfishness. 

More than that, the secret lodge sys- 
tem, and I think I could make a case if 
I had time to do it — I can hint at it today 
—the secret lodge system is the anti- 
Christ of the Bible. I believe it, and in 
the book I have written I elaborate upon 
that point. The statement where the 
anti-Christ is referred to in the first epis- 
tle of John says that every one "that 
confesseth that Jesus Christ is come in 
the Flesh is of God : And every spirit 
that confesseth not that Jesus Christ is 
come in the flesh is not of God ; and this 
is that spirit of anti-Christ whereof ye 
have heard that it should come ; and even 
now already is it in the world." Now 
see this is that spirit of anti-Christ — 
who? Why those that do not believe, 
those that deny that Jesus Christ came in 
the flesh. Who denies that Jesus Christ 
has come in the flesh? Jewish people, 
unless they abandon Judaism and come 
to Christianity, deny that the Messiah 



came at all. Why do they? C. H. 
Limon says, "We rule Christ out of the 
prayers. " Why do you? Why, you 
know the Jews ; and this very phase of 
religion is what rules the lodges. In or- 
der to g&c the Jews into membership 
they reject Jesus Christ. 

Why, Mackey says in his Lexicon that 
the religion of Masonry is a pure theism 
on which the several members engraft 
their own peculiar phases of religion, but 
he says they are not allowed to intro- 
duce them into the lodge or to connect 
their truth or falsity with the truth of 
Masonry. He says that the only prin- 
ciple of religion that they recognize is 
the existence of God, and he can qualify 
on that. In some of their books they 
have the picture of the rising sun, and 
three Hebrew names, all very innocent if 
you cannot read Hebrew. 

Mackey says that the twentieth land- 
mark of Masonry consists of the book 
of the law, and I say advisedly the book 
of the law. By this is not meant neces- 
sarily the Old and New Testament 
Scriptures, but that volume which in any 
country by the religion of the country 
is supposed to represent the revealed will 
of the great architect of the universe. 
In a Christian country this would consist 
of the Old and New Testaments. In a 
Jewish country the Old Testament alone 
would be sufficient, and in a Mohamme- 
dan country the Koran can be substi- 
tuted. Whatever book of the law is 
popular in the country that is their book 
of the law ; hence they do not exclusive- 
ly hold the Bible to be the book of the 
law; and let me tell you if a man gets 
Holy Ghost religion it will knock every 
lodge out of him that ever got into him. 

I know that I got a Methodist preach- 
er out of the Masonic lodge some time 
ago. He came out weeping when the 
light was turned on. It is like going into 
a field where there is a big, flat stone on 
the ground ; turn up the stone and let the 
light of the sun in, and every beetle 
starts to run, because the light is turned 
on, and in a little bit you cannot see 
one bug. If you can turn on the light 
sufficiently you will knock out all its 
members. 

I heard Dr. Cooper say in one of our 
National Conventions that he was out 
visiting his parishioners and he came to 



October, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



one young man : "Do you pray pub- 
licly?" "No." "Do you pray in your 
family?" "No." "Do you pray at your 
meals?" "No." "Do you pray in se- 
cret?" "No." "Do you pray at all? 
"No, I don't pray at all." "Well," he 
said, "you are about to the end now." 
He said, "The Odd Fellows take all the 
Christianity out of a man ; he is empty, 
swept and garnished and then he wants 
some system of religion — the religion of 
the lodge." 

The lodge is a wicked thing from first 
to last, the consolidated essence of self- 
ishness ; it is wrong in all of its princi- 
ples ; it is out of harmony with God Al- 
mighty who is light' and in Him there is 
no darkness at all, and John says, "If 
we say we have fellowship with God and 
walk in darkness," does he say we are 
mistaken ? Does he say we made an 
error? He puts it flatfooted in three 
letters, "we lie." Every man in the 
lodge walks in darkness, and if he says 
he has fellowship with God he does the 
very thing that John says, he lies about 
it ; he lies in his heart and in his throat 
and in his teeth, and I think I could tell 
him so. The whole thing is wicked. 

If I wanted to make a Devil that I 
knew would be acceptable I will tell you 
how I would do it. I would get a pig 
and soak him with tobacco and I would 
put three links on his right ear and the 
compass and square on the left ear, and 
a K. of P. button on his nose and the 
K. O. T. N. on his tail, and a Republican 
politician, and Democratic brewer to go 
with the Devil and it would suit me 
exactly. 

May God Almighty help us to put our 
whole strength against the lodge, antag- 
onize it intelligently, everywhere until it 
is knocked out and gone forever into 
oblivion. 



A SERIOUS QUESTION. 

"When a Mason enters a lodge room he 
should feel that he is entering a sacred place, 
one that has been erected to God, and his be- 
havior should be such as would be exoected 
in a house of worship." — Masonic Herald. 

Is it right to speak of a building as 
erected to God, if it is a building erected 
as a place in which to swear men into 
confederacy with criminals, who are aid- 
ed in concealing crimes and in extricating 
themselves from difficulties which crimes 
involve ? 



SECRET SOCIETIES ASSAILED. 

judge Orders School Boy Reinstated — 

Commends Stand of Oak Park Board. 

A severe attack on secret societies was 
made today by judge John Gibbons of 
the Circuit Court, when he ordered that 
a writ of mandamas be issued directing 
the members of the Oak Park and River 
Forest Township Board of Education 
to reinstate Edward Smith as a pupil of 
the Oak Park and River Forest town- 
ship high school. 

ihe boy, who lives with his father, 
George Smith, at 404 Home avenue, Oak 
Park, was expelled from the school 
March 22 on the charge that he was a 
member of a secret traternal society. 
The evidence showed he was not affili- 
ated with such an organization. 

"I entirely coincide with the views of 
counsel for the School Board respecting 
the baleful influence of secret societies, ' 
said Judge Gibbons in rendering his opin- 
ion. "Secret societies are, and always 
have been, a menace to order and law. 
They inculcate in their members a spirit 
of insubordination, prevarication and 
falsehood, and thereby indirectly, if not 
directly, shield from punishment mem- 
bers leagued together by secret pledges 
and passwords. 

"From the day when Robespierre and 
ether Jacobins hoisted the red flag of 
the commune to the night when McNa- 
mara and other anarchists blew up the 
Times building at Los Angeles, every 
vile conspiracy that has shocked man- 
kind and convulsed the nations may be 
traced to the evil influences of secret so- 
sieties. Secret societies are the enemies 
of the state and the foe of our Christian 
civilization. 

"However much we may dread and 
condemn secret societies, the petitioner 
in this case should not be made a scape- 
goat for the sins of others, when the 
evidence conclusively shows that he never 
was a member of any prohibited fra- 
ternity. Xot only is this true, but the 
evidence shows that the petitioner's 
father was one of the first members of 
the community to petition the Board to 
adopt rules against the existence of a 
high school fraternity or sorority.'" — 
Chicago Daily Xctcs, Aug. ?r, 1012. 



Blessed is the man that walketh not 
in the counsel of the un^odlv. (Ps. r :i.) 



178 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 1912. 



©Mortal. 



"THE CHURCH VS. THE LODGE." 

"The reason why there is so little 
power in the church is because it has 
turned its power over to the lodges. 
They are doing the work the church was 
called to do, and, when even the minis- 
ters belong to them, what can one ex- 
pect? Why is it that most men will at- 
tend the lodge in preference to the 
church? Christ taught brotherly love 
and all that is good and noble ; why does 
the church not do its duty and look after 
the widows as the lodges do?" 

The church and the lodge 

Can't go hand in hand; 
The one must fall. 

While the other shall stand. 

This letter, from a Western coast cor- 
respondent, is among responsive contri- 
butions to The Christian Herald pub- 
lished in its column headed, "How is 
your own church ?" The caption reads 
correctly still if reversed: "The lodge 
versus the church," for "These are con- 
trary, the one to the other," both in 
principle and in practice, if the estimate 
carefully made by lodge opponents is 
correct. 

The writer of the letter sees plainly a 
fault which she tries to explain ; yet 
the explanation seems not fully adequate. 
Take her plain question, "Why is it that 
most men will attend the lodge in pref- 
erence to the church?" No one really 
conversant with the inside affairs of 
lodges would seem to us able to use one 
of her answers, which would account for 
absence from church by lodge help for 
widows. Another form of answer used 
is, that lodges are doing the equivalent 
of church work. Hence, instead of going 
to churches not doing their own work, 
men go to lodges where it is done for 
churches. Again, we are in doubt 
whether the explanation explains — if, in- 
deed, there is sufficient suspense of judg- 
ment to warrant the term doubt. 

If she really feels the identity of lodge 
and church aims, practices and princi- 
ples, finding them measurably shown 
even in the life of some churches, how 
can she then find impossibility of going 



"hand in hand"? What reason is there 
in co-operation, to say "must" when she 
thinks that if one continues to care for 
widows the other must fall ? In many 
cities old ladies' homes care for them ; 
do the churches in those cities therefore 
fall ? Do charity hospitals break church- 
es down ? 

Similarity may have less to do with 
the case than she imagines ; there may 
be an unrecognized charm in dissimilar- 
ity. Possibly a man might go to a lodge 
because it makes a different appeal. Men 
who would not attend a church, no mat- 
ter what it did for widows, will go to a 
lodge. They could not smoke in church. 
It would not be in order to tell in a 
prayer meeting some of the stories that 
can be told in lodge rooms. The kind of 
company differs. Widows counted out, 
there remains the difference between 
church meetings and meetings of lodge 
men. The lodge, like the show, provides 
attractions. Some go to the theater in- 
stead of the church ; does she therefore 
blame the pulpit for being so little like 
the stage, and for leaving to the theater 
its own proper task of interesting people 
in more or less moral themes? Even if 
the pulpit became more dramatic, it 
would still lack the ballet. Regular in- 
surance companies, omitting ritualism 
and sanctimoniousness, often deal better 
with widows than the lodge, yet their 
patrons pursue their regular course so 
far as church attendance goes, and make 
no change upon being insured. 

There is no doubt that the insurance 
element of secret orders draws many in, 
but why should it change them more after 
they are in than the same element in 
other institutions? If it still be urged 
that there are different forms of help, 
it may still be questioned whether so 
much of what is imagined is not prac- 
tically wanting as to leave the question 
why men neglect church imperfectly 
answered. The carnally minded man, 
finding his conscience better quieted by 
ritual and sanctimonious forms and 
maxims, would naturally prefer what 
feeds rather than checks his moral appe- 
tites, and attend not the church, but the 
lodge. A church prayer meeting charms 
him less than a lodge dance ; a sermon 
that probes a sin is less soothing than 
an emollient ritual. 



October. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



SOME REASON. 
It is a melancholy sign of the times 
when such a man as Dr. Washington 
Gladden can say to the First Congre- 
gational church at Columbus, ( )hio : 

"I do not attribute the absence of church 
members in many cases to disaffection ; in 
most cases I believe it is simply lack of in- 
terest. For some reason they have formed 
the habit of church neglect. Some of them 
devote their Sunday to pleasure — the ways of 
Sunday diversion have been multiplying of 
late. All this means that the interests of 
recreation have taken precedence in the minds 
of m: ny church members, of the interests of 
the higher life. The fact is that this is taking 
place everywhere does not comfort me. This 
is the alarming thing.'' 

We wonder whether Dr. Gladden has 
traced that which he indicates as "some 
reason." back to one possible source. 
Dees he in his own private thinking- 
reckon as one of the forces augmenting 
the deplored drift. Sunday funerals at- 
tended in regalia, with the return trip 
following? Or does he weigh the effect 
of sanctimonious and hypocritical serv- 
ices attended on week evenings ? Has he 
cast into the philosophic scale the Ma- 
sonic superstition intruding on the dese- 
crated boundaries of Christian faith? 
It is to be noted, however, that Dr. Glad- 
den does not find the sole cause of defec- 
tion in a craving for Sunday amusement. 
He seems to feel the presence of an in- 
clusive reason, wider than can be read 
in the newer Book of Sports. Speaking 
of "some reason" why the godly man 
ceaseth and the faithful fail from among 
the children of men. he limits the ap- 
plication by the selective phrase, "some 
of them." Some of them are pleasure- 
seekers. Are yet some of them darkness- 
seekers, and are they finding what they 
seek in the secret lodge? Is it because 
the)- love that darkness, that they turn 
from the light that illumines the open 
shrine of an unforbidden gospel? Thus 
far, Jesuitry has been restrained from 
-closing the door of the Columbus 
church ; Freemasonry cannot prohibit the 
mention of Jesus name in that building 
dedicated to Him ; but Freemasonrv can 
put members of that church on their 
knees in a Columbus lodge where the 
chaplain cannot lawfully pray save in 
conformity with that prohibition. What- 
soever a man soweth, that shall he also 
reap. Has the lodge chaplain, whoever 
he may have been, sown the wild harvest 



that the pastor has reaped in the church 
held? It may be that, in cultivated lev- 
ity, indoctrinated superstition, moral 
fiction imperfectly initiative of the ethics 
of civilization ot which it is a minified 
travesty, is yet to be found an efficient 
element of "sonic reason." 



TWO INFERENCES. 

One inference is drawn by the corre- 
spondent of another publication who tells 
the story from which we think it possible 
to draw another. We say possible, ad- 
visedly, making no final decision so far 
from the source of testimony. The reg- 
ular news correspondent begins his let- 
ter with the discussion of an important 
subject, perfectly proper to present, un- 
der the circumstances, though at most 
only in a constructive sense news. A 
good part of what w^e quote, he himself 
copies. His own correspondent thus 
complains : 

" 'A few of the brothers are placed on 
committees many times, and the large 
membership of delegates or messengers 
are paid no attention to. Result : they 
feel their neglect, and stay away from 
the meetings or go as a matter of duty 
and curiosity.' 

"The brother says that he is at the 
'head of a public school having 33 reg- 
ular teachers and specialists' under him. 
has been connected with Sunday school 
work _ for many years as a teacher or 
superintendent, and has been a deacon 
for 20 years. He says he used to be reg- 
ularly at the meetings of the association 
of churches, but was never asked to do 
anything and his interest 'faded awav.' 
'I am active in other walks of life,' and 
he says he holds high official position in 
several fraternal organizations to which 
he belongs, which he regards as evidence 
that his friends there think he has 'abil- 
ity and character;' 'and yet my church 
fellowship in this association has never 
asked me to do anything.' 

"The brother probably did not write 
for publication, but the gist of his com- 
munication is given as possiblv furnish- 
ing 'food for thought' for those who are 
called to serve on program committees. 
Let the laymen and some' of the less 
prominent pastors 'speak out in meeting' 
and assert their rights. Thev are not in- 
tentionally slighted.'' 

These are wise words, and thev follow 



180 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 1912. 



the complaint with effect. Yet, another 
question arises out of the reference 
made to organizations, in several of 
which the critic is an officer. It is not 
straining a point when we consider the 
possible effect of society membership on 
one whose interest in these Christian 
gatherings has 'faded away." Even if 
the tendency did begin before the first 
of the societies was joined, and even if 
it did start as he thinks it did, still it 
remains easy to wonder whether the in- 
fluences and associations into the hands 
of which he fell, were not powerful 
agents in augmenting the tendency. 



DISTEMPERED MINDS. 

Few surprises met by a student of the- 
oretical and practical freemasonry are 
more startling at first and more bewil- 
dering afterward, than the superstition 
and mental obscuration or moral obtuse- 
ness and distortion, that appear to en- 
velop like a mist the intellectual and 
moral nature of otherwise rational and 
virtuous men. Masonry takes on the as- 
pect of insanity. Its symptoms are anal- 
ogous to those of mania. So far, in- 
deed, does the similarity go, that the ob- 
server finds himself acquiring a habit of 
treating the phenomena with similar 
charity, and suspending blame. 

This perplexing vagary of the human 
mind may not, after all, be restricted to 
masonic infatuation and superstition, but 
is perhaps included within the operation 
of a social principle recognized by Ma- 
cauley where he finds occasion to ac- 
count for the apparent inconsistency of 
a zealous Protestant and brave soldier, 
tried and executed in the cruel reign of 
James Second. Rumbold had borne a 
gallant part in the rebellion of Mon- 
mouth, and, if for no other reason than 
that Monmouth had presumed for a 
brief season to wear a crown, there was 
nothing left for his followers but to die. 
In the course of the story of his life's 
brave ending, occurs the passage to 
which we have refered, in which the his- 
torian proceeds as follows : 

"Both at his trial and at his execu- 
tion, he spoke of assassination with the 
abhorrence which became a good Chris- 
tian and a brave soldier. He had never, 



lie pretested, on the faith of a dying 
man, harbored the thought of commit- 
ting such villainy. But he frankly owned 
that, in conversation with his fellow con- 
spirators, he had mentioned his own 
house as a place where the king and the 
duke might with advantage be attacked, 
and that much had been said on the sub- 
ject, though nothing had been deter- 
mined. It may at first sight seem that 
this acknowledgment is inconsistent with 
Iris declaration that he had always re- 
garded assassination with horror. But 
the truth appears to be, that he was im- 
posed upon by a distinction which de- 
luded many of his contemporaries. 
Nothing would have induced him to put 
poison into the food of the two princes, 
or to poniard them in their sleep. But 
to make an unexpected onset on the 
troop of life guards which surrounded 
the royal coach, to exchange sword cuts 
and pistol shots, and to take the chance 
of slaying or of being slain, was, in his 
view, a lawful military operation. Am- 
buscades and surprises were among the 
ordinary incidents of war. Every old 
soldier, Cavalier or Roundhead, had been 
engaged in such enterprises. If in the 
skirmish the king should fall, he would 
fall by fair fighting, and not by murder. 
Precisely the same reasoning was em- 
ployed, after the • revolution, by James 
himself and by his most gallant and de- 
voted followers, to justify a wicked at- 
tempt on the life of William the Third. 
A band of Jacobites was commissioned 
to attack the Prince of Orange in his 
winter quarters. The meaning latent 
under this specious phrase was, that the 
prince's throat was to be cut as he went 
in his coach from Richmond to Kensing- 
ton. It may seem strange that such fal- 
lacies, the dregs of the Jesuistical casu- 
istry, should have had power to seduce 
men of heroic spirit, both Whigs and 
Tories, into a crime on which divine and 
human laws have justly set a peculiar 
note of infamy. But no sophism is too 
gross to delude minds distempered by 
party spirit." 



He that hath clean hands and a pure 
heart; who hath not lifted up his soul 
into vanity, nor sworn deceitfullv, he 
shall receive the blessing of the Lord. 
(Ps. 24:4-5.) 



October, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



181 



MASONIC PRINCIPLE AND PRAC- 
TICE. 

"Our principles are always better than our 
practices. This is true of every human organ- 
ization. Men rarely, if ever, live up to their 
professions. Nations lag behind their declared 
aims. A river cannot rise above its source, no 
matter how beautiful and wholesome the sur- 
roundings may be. And a fraternal organiza- 
tion, though founded on the grandest of hu- 
man virtues, must be measured in its influence 
for good by the standard of the individual 
members. Hence the importance of ever keep- 
ing in remembrance that truly .Masonic prin- 
ciple that it is the interior and not the exterior 
qualifications of a man that should recom- 
mend him to be a Mason. 

Whether we can trace our origin to the 
buiiding of the temple, or whether the mile- 
stones which mark our pathway through the 
dim and dusty past extend but a few centuries 
back, this is true, that the Masonic fraternity 
has weathered the storms of ages — 'the whips 
and scorns of time' — and has passed through 
the ordeal of centuries of existence with its 
escutcheon untarnished by shame, or its luster 
undimmed by dishonor. 

No enemy has ever successfully impugned 
its patriotism or cast stigma or stain on its 
bright patriotic emblem, r'atriotic duty to the 
government and obedience to the laws under 
which we live are unalterable edicts of the 
Craft. True Masonrv has always been allied 
on the side of justice and right. And, not- 
withstanding a belief among some to the con- 
trary, Masonry gives no aid or comfort to the 
man who willfully violates the laws of the 
land." — A. L. Miller, Washington, in The Ma- 
sonic Chronicler. 

Dogmatic iteration of unproved claims 
is one of the arts of the demagogue, and 
it serves the purpose of any deceiver. 
Moreover, it is charitable to believe that 
the deceiver is also deceived. Another 
has first deceived him ; or he has begun 
bis task by deceiving himself, becoming, 
thus, his own first victim. Which case 
is illustrated by the foregoing quotation, 
it is not for us to decide, but that the 
words themselves are wildly astray from 
well known and easily observed facts, 
it seems impossible not to know. Men 
of the highest qualifications have spoken 
decisively with reference to the facts, and 
have spoken the precise opposite of this 
writer's claims. The force of their words 
cannot be broken by an auxiliary claim 
that those writers were not well in- 
formed, or were not qualified by mental 
ability or moral judgment to deal truly 
and justly with subjects of this kind. 
This is not the place to display at length 
those unimpeachable, not to say peculiar- 
ly striking- credentials, which are always 



ready to be shown when occasion re- 
quires. 

We are not shut up, however, to set- 
ting other witnesses or judges over 
against such as the one from whom we 
have here quoted. Ignoring the mockery 
of pretended secrecy, we can, for our- 
selves, look with candid vision on such 
principles as are involved in the "third 
point of fellowship." and developed in 
lecture or obligation in an unmistakable 
way — or, at least, in a way that should 
be so to any man who calls English his 
mother tongue. By more than one well 
known oath, the claims dogmatically 
made in the quotation to which we here 
call attention are flatly disproved in 
Masonic words and terms. 



BLACK OR WHITE. 

His name was White but his lodge 
was black, and his ways seemed dark and 
vain. In July he was holding grand 
lodge in all his glory ; his Alpha Grand 
Lodge of Colored Masons was duly con- 
vened ; the place was Paine Memorial 
Hall in Boston, the "City of Notions. " 
Into this sacred retirement intruded In- 
spector Loughlin of police headquarters, 
with a warrant from a merely profane 
civil court for the presiding officer of 
the solemn and august convention. The 
warrant charged the great dignitary with 
stealing delegates — or initiates — or at 
least with using the name of a fraternal 
organization with fraud. 

The dreadful charge having been met 
with a plea of not guilty, the -case was 
put over from Friday till Monday. But 
the undesirable citizen was allowed his 
liberty, in the interim, only under bail 
of three hundred dollars in amount. 

The complaint was made by no less 
a dignitary than the past senior grand 
warden of Prince Hall Lodge of Colored 
Masons, which received its charter from 
England soon after Masonry took its 
rise on that island, from which it spread 
branches abroad to shadow the world. 
It is alleged that this desperate boss has 
been engaged for about two years in get- 
ting black men to wear white aprons, 
to the grave neglect and despite of the 
dead negro. Prince Hall, or of the per- 
formances which England allowed him 
and his successors to perform. This is 



L3: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1012. 



not saying" that the acts themselves are 
different; but it does recognize that Mr. 
White has had a hand in passing and 
raising negroes in and near Boston with- 
out duly connecting the activities in ques- 
tion with Englishmen, or early New 
England negroes, or even negroes now 
wearing regalia and immense titles in 
Boston. 



campaign. If they will come to this 
country we can make Elks, Moose, Beav- 
ers, Eagles, Owls, or White Rats of 
them, and teach them no end of antics. 



THEATRICAL RAMBLERS. 
About fifty people were present at the 
meeting held in a New England city in 
February, when "The Fraternal order of 
Ramblers" was organized. It is com- 
posed of theatrical people, and is design- 
ed as a national organization, with chap- 
ters in all prominent cities in the coun- 
try. Although open to all who do the- 
atrical work, the new order is mainly 
designed for the chorus. Of the large 
number of such organizations already 
existing, none were open to both chorus 
men and women. Yet it is claimed for 
them that they compose the larger part 
of the theatrical world. The chapter 
organized in February will remain the 
mother chapter of the order, although 
another was to be organized within two 
days and others were quickly to be form- 
ed. Xo doubt the membership will con- 
tinue to be composed exclusively of peo- 
ple from stage, and those connected with 
the theatre along with them. It aims to 
be a widelv extended theatrical order. 



ANYTHING TO AMUSE. 

An American newspaper commenting 
on a London escapade, remarks that 
' 'Anything to amuse' seems to be a 
motto of blase London society. Llarry 
Lehr and his monkey dinner caused 
some commotion in Newport, but the 
London leaders have outdone him. At 
a ball there a few days ago, the men 
wore imitation heads of beasts, in which 
were megaphone attachments through 
which they bellowed as they thought the 
beasts would roar ; they decked them- 
selves with paper streamers and jumped 
through paper hoops, as the animals do 
in the circus, and they fenced with foils 
tipped with powder puffs, dabbing the 
women's faces so they might claim them 
for partners afterward." 

Probably they were trying to keep 
abreast of the American progressive 



We are asked for information regard- 
ing the order of "Heptasophs." 

The organization called "Heptasophs" 
or "Seven Wise Men" is one of the old- 
est of the mutual benefit secret organiza- 
tions in this country. In ritual and cere- 
monies it resembles the other organiza- 
tions of its kind, and has many marks 
of similarity to the Masons. It "requires 
from its candidates the profession of a 
belief in a Supreme Being. It bears 
aloft the motto, Tn God We Trust,' ad- 
mitting to its mysteries both the Jew 
and Christian on the common ground of 
mutual dependence and universal broth- 
erhood under the Fatherhood of God." 
There are three degrees in addition to 
the introductory degree. 

In 1878 an organization designed for 
purely beneficiary purposes, calling them- 
selves "The Improved Order of Hep- 
tasophs," split off from the first body. 
The membership of this society is sev- 
eral times greater than that of its parent, 
and some of its features as insurance 
have since been adopted by the original 
society. 



A California Freemason wrote in the 
course of a criticism of lodge names : 
"While I have been a Spanish scholar 
for over fifty-two years, and can read 
and write that language nearly as good 
as I can English, yet I can see nothing 
in the language or people that should 
cause a Spanish name to be adopted for 
a Masonic lodge by an English speaking 
people. There are not twenty-five Ma- 
sons of Spanish blood on the entire roll 
of the grand lodge of California. The 
names of no saints (excepting the Saints 
John) have any business in being given 
to any Masonic lodge." We wonder if 
he does not write Spanish rather than 
English, even though he claims onlv to 
write "nearly as good as he can Eng- 
lish." As well as English, would hardly 
be well enough. 



Horace Greeley said: "It is impossi- 
ble to mentally or socially enslave a 
Bible-reading people." 



C::.\ 



1912 



CHRISTIAN" CYXOSUR: 



- 



Sims of $ur IBorfc. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Free will offerings since last report 
have been received for the _\ . C. A. 
work trom : Airs. H. W. Bourne, $6; 
V\ iimot Sigsw< rth, S2 : Airs. ri. A. Sigs- 
wcrui, cr2 : \\ . I. t\, $10; L. ti. Bohrer, 
Si : k. £. Stephenson, ^2: Christian Re- 
lormed Churches: Englewood. 1 
$20.26; Wellsburg, la.. S20.72 : Grand 
Rapids. Mich., S20.63 : Wright. la.. 
Si 1.03: Pella. la.. $25.78. 



OHIO CONVENTION. 

Report of Committee on State Work. 

Your committee on state work v. 
respectfully report : Our cause in Ohio 
is gaining ground, owing to efforts put 
forth by the Eastern secretary. Many 
enthusiastic meetings have been held 
during the yeai past and the Cynosure 
subscription list has been enlarged con- 
ably. 

: past rs awake to the need 
been informing themselves and have 
been giving forth needed truth in rela- 
tion to the lodge evil. Others are awak- 
ening to the need. 

\\ hile lodges and lodge members 
increased the inherent weakness :' 
system is becoming more apparent - n 
some are leaving in disgust. 

A decided step in advance has been 
taken bv many states which have placed 
laws upon their statute books forbidding 
secret societies in high schools on the 
ground that they are undemocratic and 
subversive of good morals and of good 
citizenship. Educators of this and c : 
states are opposed to the system of 
secrecy in schools and stand aln 
unanimously against it. 

Principles that are wrong in schools 
of learning are wrong in the school of 
life. Truly the leaven of truth is at work 
and there need be no discouragement as 
to the final outcome. Religious as well 
as political upheavals will follow educa- 
tion and enlightenment. 

Your committee recommends: 1. That 
sucn education as may be given by the 
circulation of the Christian Cynosure, 
and by the distribution of X. C. A. books 
and tracts, be vigorously pushed. 2. That 
pastors in sympathy be requested 



to preach on the subject at least 
eacn year and inform their members 
concerning the evils - recy. 3. 1'hat 
special etrorts be put : I through s 

inary and college thos 

are to be our iuture religious leaders. 
4. 1 hat a committee 
shall employ such help and use su 
funds as our treasury will permit for the 
prosecutioi I rk during the year. 

- • : definite work be d • 

Christian churches opposed to secrecy to 
develop the spirit of Christian brother- 
I among: their members. 



STODDARD IN PENNSYLVANIA. 
Xew York City. Sept. 12. 1912. 
Dear Cynosure : 

announcement "it's camp me 
time" brings joy t multitudes : toilers 
on the farm, in shops and the man} 
places where brain and muscle are taxed 
to provide life's necessities. The woods- 
gathering with its opportunity brings 
and makes the trials incident to tent life 
seem small indeed. The stirring mes- 
sages with the prayers, songs and tes- 
nies - II an ins] ir :: ::. 

Through the Easter. 
ber of these :am] - increases with the 
years. Not less tl *hl >re held 

near Allentown, Pa., during the 
passed, and I am told all were wel 
tended. Many songs ~ the rede 
will date their beginning : :' these 

gatherings. 

It was my privi 3 ttend three 

ise meetings. There was [ j i 
tunity both to give an I get -help. In 
looking "'unto the hills 
cometh our help" one is naturally lifted 
to a higher plane of life and better fit- 
ted for the valley of : 

Being detained. I missed the blessings 
I hoped to get at the Radical U. B. Camp 
held at Rh *s Gr . beautiful 

Cumberland Valley. I attended : - 
at Waynesbor . i hambersburg and 
Franklintown. Pa., wh -ted "this 

is the best yet." It was not difficult to 
secure Cynosure subscriptions. The in- 
creased love for Christ naturally caused 
a reaching forth to help those in 
darkness. 

Brother Burton, vice-president of our 
Pennsylvania state work, was found at 
his home in Chambersburs:. much 



L-i 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 1912. 



cheered. He looks forward to the state 
convention to be held in Philadelphia 
next March, where he promises D. V. 

. ; ve an address. 

irrovidence indicated that I spend a 
at Grantham, a new town on 
i i \eading Railroad, ten miles south 
of Harrisburg. Pa. Our good friend. 
S. R. Smith, has been the chief promoter 
e building of this town, bringing 
manufacturing ana ether interests grown 
arge for their quarters in Harris- 
turg and establishing- them here. Bro. 
1 is an elder m the Brethren in 
Church, president of Messiah's 
Bible Training School, etc. The Bible 
! was not in s;- si n, but opportunity 
tc preach was given and an invitation 
extended to address the students later. 
this school is being appreciated is 
shown by its enlarged student body. The 
evils of the lodge are presented as there 
seems tc be need and opportunity. Pro- 
fessor Enos Hess, an active N. C. A. 
worker, is well fitted for this. 

The first camp meeting attended was 
at Kreiders Grove near Cleona. Pa. This 
meeting was well sustained. Your agent 
was received kindly and given oppor- 
tunity for work. The spirit of God was 
manifest in our midst. At the Mispah 
camp meeting at South Allentown. Pa., 
I was surprised in finding so large a 
gathering. There were 163 tents. The 
Mennonite Brethren in Christ who have 
purchased here a beautiful ground, and 
well equipped it for the work, are cer- 
tainly to be congratulated. When it is 
remembered they bring much truth that 
is net popular their success is the more 
to be appreciated. Our work was given 
kindly consideration by those in charge. 

At the Emmanuel's Grove camp, north 
and west from Allentown. I found an- 
other blessed opportunity for good. This 
camp is conducted by Brother B. F. M. 
Fahl and cc-workers. While the salva- 
tion of souls was the central thought, 
your representative found opportunity 
for expression along X. C. A. lines. Our 
work was well received among the en- 
lightened, and many new subscriptions 
to the Cynosure obtained. I spoke twice 
to large audiences. 

Here in Xew York I find the usual 
opportunities of this time of the year. 
.After consultation with leaders it has 



been thought best not to attempt the N. 
Y. and X. J. convention at this time. A 
conference of the Xew York pastors of 
the Missouri Synod. Lutheran, friends 
gave another opportunity for mutual 
help. Lectures and meetings are being 
arranged which will be reported, if God 
wills, in- my next. I find myself much 
crowded for time to do the work needed. 
It is my hope to spend next month in 
the West, responding to such work as 
shall be arranged by our general sec- 
retary. Yours in the work. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



AGENT DAVIDSON'S DOINGS. 

Alexandria, La.. Sept. 13. 1912. 
Dear Cynosure : 

I am still on the Lord's side and sound- 
ing the alarm. Since my last letted I 
have been very busy. I visited the 
thirty-eighth annual session of the Tenth 
District Baptist Association at Delhi, 
La., where there were about two thou- 
sand persons in attendance. I had a very 
cordial invitation to address the asso- 
ciation, but was unable to do so, as I 
should have liked, because of a hasty call 
to return home at once. L'pon reaching 
here. I found a deep laid plot to confuse 
and upset the work in my own church, 
but I have been fortunate in blocking 
any headway that had been made. 

Though unable to speak at Delhi. I 
secured some Cynosure subscriptions 
and distributed a few tracts. I also vis- 
ited another association at Standard. La., 
where I was received very cordially, and 
treated with great consideration. I 
preached two antisecret sermons, deliv- 
ered two addresses, secured a number of 
Cynosure subscriptions, and convinced 
several that they ought to sever their 
connections with their lodges. I next 
visited CTarks. and several rural points, 
where I preached and lectured, and se- 
cured readers for the Cynosure. 

This week I am blessed with the help 
and services of Rev. W. T. Xickerson, 
of Chattanooga, Tenn., who is conduct- 
ing a fifteen day's meeting for me at the 
Shiloh Baptist Church. Great interest 
is being manifested by the people and 
souls are being saved by the gospel. God's 
word is oowerful and will prevail. Many, 
seeing the evil influences of secret so- 



October. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



l& 



cieties, are quietly renouncing them. 

I hope to be able to get the co-opera- 1 
tion oi the pastors of the city to hold 
an undenominational conference here 
sometime in October, if 1 can get Sec- 
retary W. I. Phillips. Rev. W. B. Stod- 
dard and Mrs. Lizzie Roberson to de- 
liver addresses. The lodges are strain- 
ing every point to hold their own. Pray 
for our triumph over sin and unright- 
eousness. God bless you. and make your 
efforts a glorious success. 

Sincerely yours. 

F. T. Davidson. 



"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 
Newbern, Term., Sept. 12. 1912. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips. Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother Phillips : I have been 
out in the rural districts to a camp meet- 
ing. I distributed tracts and told the 
people the sins oi secret societies. I 
found no opposition. Nearly everybody 
just listened quietly and seemed to en- 
joy the Bible lesson. That is one place 
where the Devil was dumb. We had 
great crowds at the evening meetings. 
and a good many at the day services. 
both white and colored. These people 
were all searching for Bible truths. Some 
of them sent for me three miles away 
to come to their homes with my Bible, 
in order that they might know the word 
better. I went, and I believe some were 
helped and edihed. These enquirers were 
men and women of both races. 

I am now at Newbern, Term., for a 
few weeks. When the people heard I 
was in town a goodly number of women 
and girls came to see me. We were sit- 
ting out on the porch talking, and one 
little woman said. "Sister Roberson. my 
husband and I have left the lodge since 
you were here. What you said about 
lodges that night was enough for us. We 
quit in two weeks after that. My old 
father was a good old Methodist, and he 
always taught us not to join a lodge, 
but I was just lead off by preachers and 
others into them." While we were talk- 
ing a big lodge man was sitting on a 
settee out on the ground, right in front 
of us. listening to our conversation. 
When I began to tell the sister about the 
wicked penalties, the big man interrupt- 
ed and said. "Why, woman, vou don't 



know what you are talking about. The 
lodges are doing mc re for the people than 
the church has done, or ever will do." 
I said. "Jesus gave His life for the 
church." He answered. "Oh, I am not 
thinking about Jesus. He is not going 
to give one thing for the sick. You look 
to Jesus, and you will be buried like a 
hog." I said. "Brother, do you organ- 
ize lodges ?" He was so angry and spoke 
in such a short way that I was afraid 
of him. Finally he rose, and said. "Yes, 
madam. I organize lodges, and I intend 
to keep on organizing them ; and what 
is more. I am a Christian, but I am not 
going to depend on Jesus and the church 
to take care of me. How many sick 
people are ever helped by the church ? " 
I said. "The old Baptist Church to which 
I belonged in Pine Bluff, Ark., had an 
account at the drug store just for the 
old members and the poor oi the church, 
so that all might get their medicine when 
they needed a prescription rilled. We had 
an open account with the undertaker, 
too. so that the poor could be buried de- 
cently ; and we, the members oi that 
church, sometimes raised one hundred 
and fifty dollars and kept those bills set- 
tled up : and not one ever had to swear 
to have his throat cut from ear to ear. 
and his tongue torn out by the roots." 
"Oh." he said, "you just did that for a 
big name." I replied. "We were doing 
just what the church was commanded 
to do. ( Acts 6. 1 Brother, you say you 
are a Christian, yet you blaspheme the 
name of Jesus, and glory in idolatry. 
Jesus is coming back to earth after His 
church, and what will your record be?" 
He said. "Well, you go on and follow 
Jesus and I will stay in the lodge. Noth- 
ing vou can say or show me in the Bible 
will make me give up the lodges." 1 
said, "No, you love money more than you 
love Cod." "Well." he said. "God made 
me to look out for No. 1. and I am go- 
ing to do it." I said. " 'Will a man rob 
Mai. ] :8 " ur rds have 
been stout.' 1 Mai. 3:13) You say, 'It 
is vain to serve God' (Mai. 3:14 
'You call the proud ha] j v.' Mai. 3:15 I 
The Lord says that He will judge you. 
and be a swift witness against you. 1 Mai, 
3:5V' At this he quieted down and 
walked off. saying. "Well, I will serve 
God and still stav in the lodge." I think. 



186 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1912. 



though, that he was a little uneasy about 
his big talk, for he came back to the 
store the next day and spoke very pleas- 
antly to me, and said he would visit our 
meetings sometime next week. 

Yours for the work of the Lord, 

Lizzie Roberson. 



from ®ur JttatL 



A KENTUCKY HARVEST. 

Pikeville. Ky., Aug. 27, 191 2. 
Dear Brother Phillips : We had a 
meeting in one town in which many were 
saved and sanctified, coming out from 
among the ungodly, and giving up all for 
Jesus. One lodge was completely aban- 
doned and the members sent in the char- 
ter, and left all to follow the master. It 
is wonderful how God will manifest 
Himself to us when we live faithful and 
true. 

May God bless you and your work. 
Your brother, 

A. D. Cline. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, Rev. E. B. Stewart ; Vice- 
President, Rev. Wm. Dillon ; Recording 
Secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg ; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Messrs. George W. Bond, President, 
C. A. Blanchard. Rev. G. J. Haan. Rev 
A. B. Rutt, Rev. E. B. Stewart, Eld. 
Joseph Amick, Rev. Thos. C. McKnight, 
Rev. D. S. Warner, Mr. T. C. Wendell. 
Rev. P. A. Kittilsby, and Rev. M. P. F. 
Doermann. 

Those desiring lectures or addresse* 
mnv write to any of the speakers named 
lie low ; 

Rev, \V. B. Stoddard, 3118 Fourteenth 
St.. \ T . W.. Washington! D. C. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 1732 West Elliott 
street, Alexandria, La. 

Rev. John XeLon, 909 E. Lyon St.. 
Des Moines. Iowa. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale. X. D 

Rev. B. E. Bergescn, 1727 West 56th 
St.. Seattle. Wash. 

John Franklin Browne, 43 Catharine 
St., Springfield, Mass. 



AN OPEN LETTER. 

Sccttsville, Ky. 
My Dear Brother in the Ministry : 

As I heard your lecture to the Odd 
Fellows, I feel that justice and the cause 
of Christ demand that your lecture 
should not go without a reply. 

You say, "Odd Fellowship is not a 
religion, but is a system of morality, and 
is engaged in the noble work of elevat- 
ing manhood, caring for the sick, the 
widows and orphans and burying the 
dead." 

My comment is that the Methodist 
Church is not a religion, but it has a 
religion and is a religious institution. 
Your order is not a religion, but Odd 
Fellowship has a religion and has a re- 
ligious status as an institution. And in 
taking the position that it is not a re- 
ligious institution, you differ from your 
leading authorities, your lodge Manual, 
and contradict other statements made by 
yourself in your lecture. 

You also said, "An atheist need not 
apply. A man must believe in God to 
get in." This demand for a belief in 
God and this rejection of an atheist 
gives to your order a religious status. It 
declares a religious faith and lifts up a 
religious standard that debars certain un- 
believers. It makes demands on the basis 
of a religious belief. I once knew a rail- 
road conductor who was an atheist. And 
why was he employed ? Because the rail- 
road company is not a religious institu- 
tion, has no religious belief, makes no 
religious demands, and an atheist can 
serve it. An insurance company like- 
wise is not a religious institution. It is 
a business concern, making no demands 
of belief of a religious nature. 

This demand of a belief in God, with- 
out a demand of a belief in the deity of 
Jesus Christ gives to your order an in- 
stitutional deistic religious cast. But 
while deistic it is not Christian, for it 
does not require that one believe in Jesus 
Christ. This you very well know, for 
many Jews are in your order. Odd Fel- 
lowship draws a line between God and 
Christ. It tries to rule God in and leave 
Christ out. I have before me the songs, 
prayers and ritualistic ceremonies of your 



October, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



18" 



order, and no Christ can be found in 
any of them. The Methodist Church has 
an institutional Christ; your home has 
an institutional Christ ; your order has 
no institutional Christ — it is Christless. 
The grand secretary of the grand lodge 
of your order, C. H. Lyman, Columbus, 
Ohio, in answering a hypothetical ques- 
tion relative to using the name of Christ 
in lodge prayers replied, "Christ would 
be ruled out, you know the Jews." Now 
if you can rule Christ out because of the 
Jews, which is done in your manual, 
why not rule God out because of the 
atheist. "God out of Christ is a consum- 
ing fire." 

Again, you say, "An Odd Fellow's 
lodge has its altar, its Bible, its prayer 
and its song." Altar: "A table to re- 
ceive offering to some deity. "' — Webster. 
These implements give to your order a 
religious status. What more does any 
religion have ? You very well know the 
typical significance of an altar to a Chris- 
tian. How can professed Christians bow 
at so sacred an emblem, typical of the 
sacrificial death of Christ, in the lodge 
room of an institution which recognizes 
God, but stops short of Christ. How 
much does this lack of being sacrilegious ? 

Y r ou mention your lodge burial of the 
dead. The manner of the burial of your 
dead gives to your order a religious cast. 
And it buries all, good and evil, under 
the same ceremony. Officially, as the 
order does not recognize Christ, it pur- 
ports to send all to heaven without 
Christ. How you, a minister, can per- 
form the ritual burial ceremony of the 
order over one who died in sin, and 
then return to your church and preach, 
that to be saved one must be saved from 
sin here, is a mystery. 

■ Your order "is a system of morality," 
you say. The morality of your order is 
a morality without an official recognition 
of the author of Christian morals. Now, 
a morality that does not officially recog- 
nize Christ has always been self-suffi- 
cient, self-righteous, a boasting morality, 
full of pride, and its advocates the very 
hardest sort of men to Christianize. That 
which lifts itself up against the church 
and says, "See what we have done! 
Can the church beat that?" Immoral 
ity is much easier converted and Chris- 



tianized than morality; for immorality 
under sense of guilt and its own insuf- 
ficiency comes in its tears to the Christ 
who cleanses, while morality is self- 
sufficient and indifferent. 

The good works you refer to, caring 
for the sick, the widows and orphans, 
are commendable in themselves and yet 
members of your order must not be de- 
ceived into thinking that these have any 
Christian significance. Good works must 
be done in the name of Christ to merit 
Christian reward. The works of your 
order are simply humanitarian and must 
be distinugished from the works of the 
church which are Christian. The church 
officially performs her works in the name 
of Jesus Christ. If your order fails to 
impress this on the minds of its members 
it deceives its own followers. The fact 
is most lodges and lodgemen leave the 
impression that they are performing 
Christian works, whereas they are 
humanitarian only. 

"Odd Fellowship is founded on the 
Bible." Now, I want to ask you if your 
statement is true? Can anything prop- 
erly be said to be founded on the Bible 
that is not founded on Christ? Christ 
is the theme of The Book. Is it not 
misleading and- deceiving the less in- 
formed, who join your order, to say it 
"is founded on the Bible," white it re- 
jects Christ? 

If you contend that in basing your 
order on Bible narratives you base it on 
Christ, the soul of the Bible, I reply. 
Your order is grossly inconsistent, then. 
in not giving to Christ an official recog- 
nition in your manual and making him 
the soul of your manual and order, as 
the church does. Then, too, your order 
is deceiving the Jews, for if you tell 
tnem that your order is based on the 
Bible and through it on Jesus Christ. 
and make Him the theme of your order 
as the church does, the jews will all 
leave your order. Those institutions 
which, though unrecognized by many of 
their adherents, are designed to become 
substitutes for the church, back up as 
close to the church as they expediently 
can and then hoist their flag and say, 
"We are founded on the Bible." But 
a careful examination shows that they 
are deceptive in their claims. 



188 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 1!)12. 



"I have told my wife,? you say, "that 
if I should die and she should find her- 
self unable to care for my children, that 
she must not put them in the Methodist 
Orphanage but in the Masonic or Odd 
Fellow's Home. For these homes have 
more money and are better prepared to 
take care of the children. Then, too, if 
put into the Methodist Orphanage they 
may be put out into families, become 
estranged from each other, adopted and 
lose their paternal name. In the lodge 
homes this will not be done." 

I appreciate very much your paternal 
instincts and sentiments here expressed, 
so far as the mere fact of your children 
being better cared for and not running 
the risk of losing their paternal name is 
concerned. But, if what I am to sug- 
gest is true, then you are not only m 
error but leading others to a wrong 
course of action as regards the relation 
of their offspring to the church and to 
Christ. 

i. Such statements put you in an in- 
consistent and disparaging attitude to 
your church. You have virtually said 
to the world that your church is incom- 
petent ; and between giving to your 
church orphanage and youi lodge homes 
you have practically recommended your 
lodge as the place for the church people 
to put their money to secure the best re- 
sults in the financial care of their chil- 
dren. With such statements before the 
public, how can you consistently recom- 
mend that your church people support 
your Church Orphanage? Tell the peo- 
ple to put their money into the church 
orphanage when they can get better re- 
sults in the lodge homes ! In collecting 
your church assessments, should a mem- 
ber say to you, "See here, I don't want 
any assessment money which I pay into 
the church to go to the Church Orphan- 
age, for you say the lodge gives better 
results, and hence I want to pay to the 
lodge," what could you say? 

Then, again, such language lessens the 
confidence and respect of men for the 
church. The men outside will say : The 
lodge is doing things today. I can hard- 
ly see how you can make a logical plea 
for men to come into the church when 
it is so delinquent and unpromising. How- 
much more in keeping 1 with the facts 



it would have been, had you said, "If you 
lodge people will put the time, money 
and energy into the church that you are 
putting into the lodges, the church will 
take care of your widows and orphans, 
and Christ will then get the glory and 
not a Christless lodge." Xo wonder the 
orders can do things ! They are getting 
money that should. come to the church. 
A steward of your church in this county 
says, so I am informed, that he knows 
men who give $10 and $15 a year to 
their lodges, and it is by hard work that 
he can get 50 cents out of them per 
quarter for the church. Remarks like 
this of yours help to bring about this 
state of things. Lodgery is ruining the 
finances of the church and ministers are 
largely to blame. 

2. As already stated, your order does 
not officially accept Christ. The church 
does. Now what puzzles me is that you 
should prefer to put your children into 
the care of an institution where Christ 
is not taught ; and where children are 
brought up with lodge prayers, songs 
and ceremonies where Christ's name is 
never heard. If Christ is ever named in 
your Odd Fellow Homes it is because 
those in authority go beyond the lodge 
creed as expressed in the manual. There 
is no "blood on the doorposts" of your 
lodge orphanages and in putting children 
there they are swung outside of the pro- 
tection of the "blood" so far as the 
institution is concerned. The church 
has on its doorposts, officially and ritual- 
ly, the protecting blood, and the same 
on its orphanages, and while to human 
prospects the appearances of financial 
consideration, because of so many pro- 
fessed Christians putting their money 
into the lodge instead of the church, may 
be better in the lodges, I should prefer 
to risk the church to care for my off- 
spring. 

You mislead your brothers of the order 
and misrepresent your critics when you 
fail to clearly state the real objections of 
the latter. After stating the good things 
your order was doing you ask, "How is 
it because we are caring for the sick, 
the widows and orphans, that you find 
fault with us?" This remark had a 
telling result, for several of your broth- 
ers smiled at each other and nodded 
their heads. Now, I doubt whether you 



October, 1912 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



189 



ever heard of one objecting to secret 
societies because they took care of wid- 
ows and orphans. Had you stated, 
"Some of our personal friends are 
opposed to our order because they 
think the time, money and energy spent 
in the lodges would be better spent in the 
churches," and then had proceeded to 
show wherein your order, was right and 
these friends were wrong, you would 
have shown fairness and justice in argu- 
ment. The mention of such grounds tor 
opposition before an audience will carry 
sufficient force to make it appear that 
the opposition is opposed to some hu- 
mane act. This may serve your purpose 
and lead some of your lodge brothers to 
misjudge your brethren m the ministry, 
but some will see and regret unfair argu- 
ment. 

I beg you, I pray you, my brother in 
the ministry of our Lord Jesus Christ, 
come out of your secret orders which 
draw a line between God and Christ, 
and prove to men that God in Christ 
and the church is sufficient to build up 
humanity and promote morality. Amen. 

Yours, 

Walker Mayfield. 



ENCOURAGING WORDS. 
Detroit, Mich., Aug. 30, 1912. 
Mr. W. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: I fully realize the value of 
the X. C. A. in this lodge ridden country 
and shall therefore gladly continue to 
keep the Cynosure, which, owing to 
present conditions, must depend upon a 
limited number of subscribers. 
Yours very truly. 

(Rev. ) L. List. 



From Eld. I. J. Rosenberger : 

It always affords me a pleasure to 
meet with the annual assembly of the 
Ohio X. C. A. I feel sure that the 
X". C. A. is doing effective work, especial- 
ly in one line — in uniting and organiz- 
ing the scattered forces that stand op- 
posed to secrecy. What can ten thou- 
sand scattered and unorganized soldiers 
do on the field of battle? There is no 
doubt, however, that the state organiza- 
tions could be improved. The X\ C. A. 



organized as it is, with its effective pub- 
lishing force, and its effective men in the 
field, gives courage to many to renounce 
their allegiance to the galling yoke of 
secrecy with which they find themselves 
enslaved. 



Rev. G. A. Pegram says in an encourag- 
ing letter : 

In every place I have met with hearty 
responses to my work, but also with 
some opposition. Everywhere I meet 
with seceders from all sorts of lodges. 
They and some who are now members 
seem anxious for light on lodgery. 

You know better than I how many 
tracts, books and Cynosures I have 
distributed in the last year. I have never 
preached anywhere or held a meeting 
where I did not raise my voice against 
the secret empire. 



H. F. Stubbs writes from California: 

I find the lodge system very strongly 
intrenched here in Whittier, although 
this is considered a very popular city for 
religion. The Quakers have a strong 
college here and a church membership of 
nine hundred. There are several other 
denominations with strong churches. 

Evangelists Brown and Currie have 
been here and delivered powerful blows 
against the lodge. Another courageous 
evangelist, St. Clare, now holding meet- 
ings, is not afraid to proclaim the truth 
on this question, and many are trembling 
on account of their sins. 



McFarland, Cal., Aug. 8, 1912. 

Dear Brother Phillips : I am praying 
daily for the King s blessing on your 
work. How glad we ought to be that 
the Great I Am takes such poor things 
as men to glorify His name. We are on 
the battlefield today. Tomorrow we may 
be at home with Jesus. Hallelujah! 

I never exp-ect to see you here, but I 
will in the King's country, and that will 
be a glorious meeting. Surely He will 
come or send for us soon. 

The Lord bless and keep you. 
Your brother, 

Geo. A. Shealey. 



; 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUR! 



October. 191: 



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October, 1912. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 191 

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19: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1912. 



THE MASTER'S CARPET. 

By Ednaond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

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CONTENTS 



Marlboro, by Miss S. F. Heinman 193 

Here We Balk (Editorial in Berne Wit- 
ness 197 

Masonic Temples, by President Bian ch- 
ard 198 

The Play and the Candle— 

The Cost of the Affair 207 

Guardians of Liberty — 
Are They a Secret Society ' 207 

"Oh, Consistency," by Rev. J. R. Millin.209 

Editorial — 

International Conference 210 

Fleet Elks 211 

Brightening Defensive Armor 211 

The Hand of Joab 212 

Intermixture the Secret 214 

The Model Church 215 

News of Our Work — 

Michigan Convention 217 

Fraternal Reserve Association 217 

Addresses by Pres. Blanchard 217 

Christian Conference in Louisiana. .. .218 
Campaign of Secretary Stoddard.. ..218 
Revival and Christian Conference. .. .219 

A Seceder and Evangelist 220 

"Lizzie Wood's Letter" 220 

Advertisements 222 



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'Jesos answered him, — I spake openly to fhe world; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLV. 



CHICAGO, NOVEMBER, 1912. 



NUMBER 7. 



■ 




■ 



CHAPTER II. 
Some History and a Problem. 

(Synopsis. — Chapter I. introduced four 
youg people on their way to Marlboro Col- 
lege. In their conversation they state their 
reasons for desiring a college education. 
Ruth Markham is seeking culture to pre- 
pare her for travel abroad and for a literary 
career; Celia Bond wishes to fit herself to 
teach; Lyman Russell hopes to better his 
circumstances and to solve his religious 
doubts; Bayard Kent goes because it is the 
conventional thing. On reaching Marlboro 
after dark, Ruth discovers that she has 
lost her purse containing one hundred dol- 
lars.) 

"You ought to be able to reach the 
conductor by telegraphing- to the next 
station." It was Lyman's voice, cool, 
collected, authoritative. "What marks 
of identification has your purse?" 

With the collaboration of the four, a 
telegram was composed and sent to the 
conductor of the train they had so re- 
cently left ; but so much time had been 
consumed that it was impossible to reach 
the train at its next stop, and it was the 
general opinion that they would better 
not wait at the station for the reply. 
Ruth's nerves were badly shaken, and 
her friends wished to take her away to a 
quieter spot than the still crowded and 
noisy station. Ruth was about to set 
foot in a waiting hack when she remenv 
bered her oenniless condition, and turned 
away with a half-hysterical exclamation. 

The young men at first urged her to 



ride, but realizing on second thoughts 
that the fresh air and exercise would do 
her more good after a day's confinement 
to the train, they proposed that the quar- 
tet should walk up together to the board- 
ing house where Ruth and Celia were to 
be domiciled for the next few months. 

Bayard took Ruth's arm in brotherly 
fashion, and Lyman, followed with Ce- 
lia. For years afterwards, that walk 
seemed to Ruth's remembrance like a 
long, painful delirium. The great elms 
and maples that shaded the streets were 
dripping with rain ; the arc-lights above 
seemed no brighter than candles ; the 
dwellings were hidden in somber masses 
of shade. Bayard knew Plum street 
well. The unpretentious home of his late 
distinguished kinsman was one of its 
landmarks. He indicated on the right 
near the station the striking- colonial 
house erected by President Earle's im- 
mediate predecessor. As they neared the 
intersection of Plum street with College 
avenue, handsome stone boarding-halls, 
modestly called cottages and bearing the 
names of the donors, made larger areas 
of brightness in the gloom, but the beau- 
tiful square in the heart of the. town, 
known as the campus, and. verdant with 
turf and trees, was only a huge blot, 
pricked by a few pin-points of light. Even 
the impressive stone colonade erected as 
a memorial to the martyrs of iqoo. Marl- 



194 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



boro alumni and their families who had 
perished at the hands of the Boxers, was 
but vaguely outlined in the blackness as 
they passed a few rods distant. 

Bayard's ready tact perceived that 
Ruth was in no mood to enjoy descrip- 
tions of her new surroundings, and he 
soon returned to the subject uppermost 
in her thoug-hts. 

"Ruth," he said coaxingly, "if you 
don't find your purse — as of course you 
will — I want to ask a great favor of you. 
I have five hundred dollars deposited in 
the Marlboro National Bank ; I can't 
possibly use it all up this semester. I 
should take it as a great kindness if you 
would accept a loan of a hundred dol- 
lars of it. It is just lying idle, drawing 
no interest, so you might every bit as 
w r ell have it. Indeed, you might better 
have it if the bank should fail as it did a 
few years ago. You remember, I dare 
say, the sensational failure of the old Na- 
tional Bank here?" 

Ruth did not remember. 

"Oh, you were too young then, of 
course, to take an interest in the daily 
papers, but the thing was heralded from 
Maine to California — the biggest sensa- 
tion in Marlboro's history since she was 
the grand central station on the Under- 
ground Railroad. Just as in the case of 
the man who threw himself into the riv- 
er, 'there was a woman at the bottom of 
it.' You must have heard of Callie Chap- 
man, the notorious swindler, who hyp- 
notized the most cautious bank officials 
into making loans beyond the legal limits 
and without any adequate security. She 
worked off some story about being the 
daughter of our distinguished Scottish 
multimillionaire, and handed out notes 
for a hundred thousand dollars as if they 
were cigaret papers. Poor thing ! She 
died in state's prison about two years 
later, preceded and followed by some 
half-dozen of her victims. 

"But there's a pleasanter side to the 
story. A number of students had money 
in the Marlboro National Bank, and of 
course the bank failure was a serious 
thing to them. Among them was a young 
colored man named Money — odd coinci- 
dence, wasn't it? — who was taking a 
theological course here. Shortly after 
the disaster, he was speaking in a church 
in Bervl, eight miles from here, and in 



his address he told of the great things 
he had hoped to do for his people in the 
South, and how his hopes had been 
blighted by the.bank failure. The pastor 
of the Beryl church sat right down and 
wrote to the Scottish-American pluto- 
crat, suggesting that as his name had 
been used — however without foundation 
— in swindling the bank officials and rob- 
bing the depositors and stockholders, 
perhaps he would be good enoug'h, as a 
matter not of obligation but of gener- 
osity, to help make good the losses of 
the most needy. 

"Saint Andrew responded nobly. 
Every penny was restored to the student 
depositors. Of course, he gave Marl- 
boro a library, too, probably the finest 
he ever took out of his Santa Claus pack. 

"In fact, so far was that 'ill wind' 
from blowing 'nobdy good' that its re- 
sults extend even to the Pacific Coast 
About two years after the Marlboro 
bank failure, that Beryl pastor, while 
attending a missionary convention at 
Marlboro, heard a veteran worker for 
Orientals in America plead for a new 
mission building in San Francisco, to re- 
place one destroyed by the earthquake 
and fire. The pastor was so impressed 
by the appeal that he wrote again to 
Saint Andrew and secured a gift of ten 
thousand dollars. I was in San Fran- 
cisco this summer and saw the result, a 
handsome five-story and basement build- 
ing with front of cream-colored pressed 
brick and crenelated roof-line, a light- 
house in the moral darkness of China- 
town. 

"That cloud certainly had a silver lin- 
ing, or a gold one, I might better say. Of 
course, the Beryl minister got various 
good things out of it for himself, too, as 
by-products — a visit to Skibo Castle, for 
instance, with all expenses paid." 

Ruth listened half-heartedly with an 
occasional stifled sob. 

Bayard recognized the difficulty of the 
situation. "Do forgive my loquacious 
gossip," he begged ; "you remember 
what Mrs. Browning says about 'clocks 
voluble with lead.' And you will be good 
enough to accept a small loan, won't 
you? — that is, if you have occasion, 
which I feel sure you won't." He was far 
from feeling the assurance he expressed, 
and he knew that Ruth felt the same. 



November, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



195 



"To lend you the money will give me 
not the slightest inconvenience, but, on 
the contrary, the greatest possible pleas- 
ure." 

By this time they had reached the 
steps of the large, new attractive dwell- 
ing where the girls had pre-engaged 
their board and lodging. The other 
couple had come up behind, and Lyman's 
quick ear had caught Bayard's last sen- 
tence. 

"Miss Markham," he interjected, "you 
doubtless know that Mr. Kent's great- 
uncle, a former president of this college, 
was the author of a textbook on ethics — 
or moral philosophy, as it was called in 
his day — and that -the cardinal tenet of 
his system was Benevolence. He was said 
to be the complete embodiment of his 
favorite doctrine. His grand-nephew 
aspires to be a worthy successor? 

"Miss Markham," retorted Bayard, 
masking his annoyance with an air of 
levity, "pay no attention to this person. 
He is an impostor. He is going about 
under an alias. His real name is Butt- 
inski. I bid you both cm revoir/' 

As the two young men descended the 
steps, Bayard continued : "What made 
you do it, Russell? Of course, I ought 
to have seen that you had come up to 
us ; but still — why, man, I counted on 
your help in persuading her ! Don't you 
want her to borrow the money?" 

"No, I don't. And I don't believe she 
will, either. I think she will sell her 
false hair first." 

"Cynic ! I can't think why you are so 
hard on the girl. She is a mighty good 
sort." 

"That's just the point. Good metal 
will stand tempering. If 'it is good for 
a man to bear the yoke in his youth,' it 
ought to be good for a woman, too. I 
am a thorough believer in the equality of 
the sexes." 

"Then in fire or shipwreck you would 
discard the principle of saving- the wom- 
en first?" 

"Oh, well, I was talking about moral 
equality. That little Flossy Markham" 
— "But her name isn't Flossy," protested 
Bayard — "I repeat, that little Flossy 
Markham is as worthy of moral disci- 
pline as you or I." 

"Would you welcome a footpad that 
would rob you of all vour monev?" 



"He'd not get a hundred dollars, or 
anything like it," returned Lyman grim- 
ly; "no, my moral discipline is coming in 
a different way." 

The two meanwhile had been retracing 
their steps along Plum street. "Where 
do you go now?" asked Lyman. 

"I have just about seventeen families 
of relatives here, and they have all in- 
vited me to stay with them till the com- 
pletion of the new Men's building. It's 
mighty embarrassing, for they probably 
won't let me pay board." 

"H'm ! wish I had some relations of 
that stripe in Marlboro. But what about 
this Men's building? Is it the Marlboro 
equivalent for the fraternity houses of 
other colleges?" 

"Equivalent, no ; substitute, yes. The 
club features, I mean the recreation and 
assembly privileges, are open to all the 
college men. They are all to pay a 
small fee, you'll find" — then he paused 
in some embarrassment. He knew in- 
tuitively that Lyman Russell would not 
find five dollars a small fee. 

"I presurme I shall have very little use 
for the recreation privileges of the new 
Men's building, but of course I wouldn't 
refuse them to others in different cir- 
cumstances. It does strike me, though, 
that there is danger of over-emphasizing 
the social side of college life. In my 
father's day, Marlboro life was a des- 
perately serious affair. It wasn't thought 
necessary then to build and equip amuse- 
ment halls for the students." 

"Is it quite fair to speak of the Men's 
building as an 'amusement hall ?' " sug- 
gested Kent, mildly. "But I freely ad- 
mit that some of the diversions of the 
early Marlboroites are no longer possi- 
ble to us. I presume you have heard of 
the worthy abolitionist of Marlboro — 
one of many, as you know — who was be- 
trayed by a neighbor to slave hunters. 
and finally plead guilty to the charge of 
harboring darkies; driven still further, 
he finally led them to his barn and 
showed them a pair of new born black 
lambs. Some of the students oi that 
era found amusement in disguising 
themselves as runaway slaves and so 
throwing their pursuers off the scent. 
w r hile the real runaways improved the 
opportunity to make good their escape. 



196 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



"It is really too bad that we have no 
such means nowadays of cultivating our 
sense of humor. It was after the pass- 
ing of those good old days, but still 
many years ago, that the stuffed gorilla 
was taken by night from the college mu- 
seum and hoisted to the top of the sol- 
diers' monument in the heart of the 
town. It is said that the exposure and 
humiliation caused the poor beast to lose 
his hair." 

Lyman declined to be amused by this 
recital and remained silent. 

"I suppose," resumed Bayard, "you 
would like to go back to the time when 
the young men cleared the forest and 
the girls washed dishes at from three to 
seven cents an hour. Would you con- 
demn Ruth Markham to washing dishes 
for three cents an hour?" 

"I was thinking," replied Lyman 
gravely, "that any girl should be able to 
wash dishes ; but it would hardly be fair 
to ask her to do it for three cents an 
hour. The cost of board is fully five 
times what it was then, and the cost of 
labor should advance in proportion." 

Bayard was startled at the suggestion 
of Ruth's doing kitchen work for her 
board. "I wonder if she would think of 
such a thing?" he exclaimed. 

"I wonder, too," said Lyman thought- 
fully ; "I hope so." 

"What? You don't mean it?" 

"I meant that I hoped she might think 
of it ; but I doubt if she could do it 
without losing caste." 

"I protest at that view of the case ; 
Marlboro is just as democratic as it ever 
was." 

'' 'Quod est demonstrandum' — which is 
to be proved. I wish I knew ; but I shall 
find out soon enough. Still, how can we 
expect more of the spirit of democracy 
in Marlboro than in the nation at large? 
Is our country so democratic as it once 
was? Is there the same equality of op- 
portunity?" 

"If not, it is because the rapidly in- 
creasing population is beginning to pro- 
duce a sensible pressure on the means of 
subsistence ; competition is increasing, 
and difference of natural endowment 
create differences in the advancement of 
individuals. But these economic prob- 
lems do not enter into college life except 
in theory." 



"You are quite sure of that?" There 
was a note of sarcasm in Lyman's even 
tones. 

"I beg your pardon, Russell ; I know 
mighty little about economic problems, 
and even less about life. But I can tell 
you this ; there isn't another place on top 
of the earth where money counts for so 
little as in Marlboro." 

Bayard spoke with the enthusiasm of 
conviction, but Lyman only answered 
dubiously, "I hope that's true. You 
see," he added after a pause, "my inter- 
est in Miss Markham's plight is not 
wholly altruistic. I have a similar prob- 
lem of my own to solve. It isn't that I 
have lost money; I've never had it to 
lose. I earned last summer a little more 
than enough to take me here, and I have 
no one to depend upon but myself. It 
remains to be seen whether as a self- 
supporting student I can claim equal 
rank, socially, with the rest. Of course, 
it is of little moment to me ; I am not a 
gregarious animal. But with a girl I 
fancy it would be quite different. A 
woman's cowardice in the face of public 
sentiment is a pitiful thing — a pitiful 
thing! I suppose we men like women 
better for being clinging creatures, but 
fully half their peculiar trials and temp- 
tations arise from that fact. 

"I admit," he added more lightly, "I 
know precious little about women. Miss 
Markham may be an exception ; I hope 
she is ; but if her money is irrecoverably 
lost, as I have no doubt it is, I predict 
that she has a thorny road before her 
unless she accepts your help or that of 
her friends at home. Yet I can't help 
hoping she will refuse. Short of actual 
want, I should be willing to have her 
suffer almost any hardship just to prove 
what a glorious being a heroic woman 
can be." 

"Well," said Bayard slowly, "I think 
Ruth Markham is a strong character ; 
but I wouldn't go so far as to say that 
she is a second Lucy Stone or Alice 
Freeman. Still, self-supporting students 
are fairly numerous, yet among the girls, 
and with the men, self-support, is a com- 
monplace. It's a weakness of mine to 
want to be on the side of the majority, 
but in the matter of self-support. I'm 
well aware that I belong to the minor- 



November, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



197 



ity." And the lad gave a sigh that did 
him credit. 

The two had rambled on in the misty 
darkness and were now standing beside 
the steps of a rectangular brick church, 
of more than Puritan simplicity of archi- 
tecture. They paused and Bayard looked 
up. 

"Until ten years ago," he said, "the 
pulpit of that church was filled by a 
man who earned a good part of his edu- 
cation by his labor as a carpenter ; who 
entered Yale at an age when most pro- 
fessional men are well started on the 
practise of their professions ; and whose 
bill of fare during his preparatory 
studies, was drawn from the cracker 
barrel and the molasses jug in the cor- 
ner of his attic room. His life was doubt- 
less shortened by his privations ; but the 
story of his heroic struggles is as inspir- 
ing as Abraham Lincoln's," 

"But that was long ago," persisted Ly- 
man. "I am not so sanguine about the 
present. I'll venture you could search 
New Haven from end to end to-day and 
find no student reared on crackers and 
molasses." 

"Oh, well, we've learned to live more 
hygienically. But I dare say you could 
find equal self-denial and devotion, and 
— I can't make any statements about 
Yale 3 of course — but I'm sure that in 
Marlboro such self-denial and devotion 
would be respected." 

"If backed up by unusual talents, they 
might be," granted Lyman ; "but perhaps 
the possession of unusual talents is the 
only thing that would justify such sac- 
rifices. Meanwhile, it remains to be 
seen how Marlboro will treat Miss Mark- 
ham if she washes dishes for her board, 
and how it will treat me in any case." 

"Isn't it true," ventured Bayard tim- 
idly, "that we generally receive the treat- 
ment we expect?" 

"You're dead right!" — with harsh em- 
phasis — "but I'm an indigo-dyed pessi- 
mist tonight. You see, I traveled all last 
night with practically no sleep at all." 
He might liave added that he had had 
during his thirty-six hours of travel al- 
most as little food. "I am sure of a roof 
over my head for the present, if I can 
find it in this Stygian darkness, and I 
think I'll turn in, earlv as it is." 



"Come down to the corner drug store 
first, and have some hot chocolate," 
urged Bayard cheerily. 

It was a tempting offer, but Lyman 
persistently, almost sullenly refused. 
Seeing Bayard felt hurt, he relented 
sufficiently to accept his guidance to his 
lodging. They parted on the porch with 
a hearty hand-grip which assured Ly- 
man that he had at least one friend in 
Marlboro. 

(To be continued.) 



HERE WE BALK. 

No more resolutions of respect will 
be published for the K. of P. lodge if 
they are worded like the new form 
brought in for publication this week. 

A printed form, nicely executed, evi- 
dently intended for framing, with spaces 
for names and dates all filled out, was 
handed in and reads : "Once again the 
Supreme Chancellor of the Universe 
hath summoned through death, a 
Brother Knight, from the labors of the 
castle here to the joys of the beautiful 
castle in the New Jerusalem. As a re- 
compense of his service under tri-col- 
ored banner, he has received the 
plaudit 'well done,' from the Great 
Father." 

Now we have no objection to men 
banding themselves together for mutual 
protection and helpfulness. We can see 
no wrong in that. But when these men 
take Holy Writ and garble and distort 
it and purposely leave out the name of 
God to keep from offending those of 
their number who do not believe in the 
author of the Bible and say that mem- 
bership and service in their company is 
a passport into the presence and favors 
of the One in whom they do not believe, 
then it is time to show up the absolute 
silliness and idiocy of what is nothing 
but a sham and a humbug. 

How any member of a Christian 
church and professing lover of God and 
His Son and believer in the blood- atone- 
ment can stoop down to such downright 
mockery and blasphemy is beyond our 
comprehension. — The Berne Witness, 
Aug. jo, IQI2. 



198 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 




G. A. BLANCHARD. 



MASONIC TEMPLES. 
In many cities and towns at this time 

there are being erected structures adapt- 
ed to public and private meetings, which 
bear the title indicated above. As invest- 
ments these buildings have not ordinarily 
been financially profitable, so far as I can 
learn. Many readers will recall the com- 
plications connected with the erection of 
the large Masonic Temple in this vicin- 
ity. It did not rent well for a time, and 
there was a very unfortunate circum- 
stance connected with the payment of 
taxes. The "Medinah Temple" was an- 
other and later enterprise of the Masons 
in the same city, which went into the 
hands of a receiver. I chance to know 
that another Masonic temple erected in 
one of our larger cities and costing a 
large sum of money, changed hands on 
a mortgage for only nineteen thousand 
dollars. I mention these matters simply 
because they have a bearing on the case. 
Some persons may say who would ex- 
pect temples to pay? Temples are not 
erected for the purpose of investment ; 
they are erected for worship. But what- 
ever may be the purpose, the fact is as 



above stated. This would seem to show 
that a Masonic Temple should be erected 
and maintained by those interested, and 
without the hope of financial returns. 
What Is a Temple? 
Men are habitually careless regarding 
the use of words. They frequently em- 
ploy words concerning the meaning of 
which they have no definite thought. 
This is not advisable. Let us therefore 
stop a moment on this expression. A 
temple is defined as a building erected 
for the worship of a god or the worship 
of gods. All men who have read a little 
about the history of the world know that 
throughout all lands, Christian and pa- 
gan, these buildings for the worship of a 
god or of gods are prominent character- 
istics of the architectural landscape from 
the forests and plains of Africa, Egypt, 
India, China, the Islands of the Sea and 
north to the utmost bounds of civiliza- 
tion. Temples are found under every 
sky. And these temples are all intended 
for the worship of a god or gods. 

What Is a Masonic Temple? 

A masonic temple is a building erected 
for the worship- of the masonic god. 
This is obvious from the title and its 
definition. It is not an unkind or abusive 
remark to say this, for it is simply the 
expression of the facts in the case.* 
Christian temples are for the worship 
of the Christian God. Masonic temples 
are for the worship of the masonic god 
and no Freemason should be offended 
when a simple fact like this is stated. It 
therefore becomes a question of great 



*Albert G. Mackey, 33d degree Mason, 
Past General Grand High Priest, etc., etc., 
author of "Text-book of Masonic Jurispru- 
dence," "Symbolism of Free-masonry," etc., 
etc., under the head of "Temple" in his 
Encyclopedia of Free-Masonry he says that 
speculative masonry is intimately connect- 
ed with temple building and temple wor- 
ship; that the spiritualizing of the Temple 
is the first, the most prominent, and the 
most pervading of all symbols of Free- 
masonry. It is that which most emphat- 
ically gives it its religious character." 



November, 191 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



199 



interest who and what is the god of 
Freemasonry? If Freemasonry has but 
one god and he is the true God mani- 
fested in Jesus Christ, then the Masonic 
Temple is for the worship of this true 
God, and is simply another place for the 
worship of God in Jesus Christ. 

It is true that in most of our cities and 
towns there are already a sufficient num- 
ber of buildings erected for the Chris- 
tian's God. In fact, at this present time, 
there is a movement, widespread, among 
the converts in heathen lands to dimin- 
ish the number of buildings for the pur- 
pose of Christian worship. The reason 
is obvious. There is no essential differ- 
ence in the purpose which is sought to 
be attained by the Baptists, Congrega- 
tional or Presbyterian churches ; they all 
recognize the same text-book as authori- 
tive; they all accept the fundamentals of 
Christian faith. Converts in heathen 
lands cannot understand why a ques- 
tion of government or of ritual should 
separate persons who are so united ; and 
throughout the heathen world at this 
present time there is a strong movement 
toward the unification of the Christian 
denominations, worshiping one God, rec- 
ognizing one Book, and it would seem to 
be a short and easy road to the union 
which they desire and propose. The rea- 
son of the case is equally strong in our 
own country, in Great Britain and other 
lands where the Christian faith has had 
a history of centuries. The difficulty is 
that vested interests, both general and 
personal, have become so large that it 
will be more difficult here, than among 
the converts in heathen countries, to se- 
cure this unification of Christian effort, 
which would seem to be the demand 
alike of common sense, business sense 
and Christian faith. If this is true, what 
folly to add to the already numerous 
places of worship a Masonic Temple, if 



such Temple is for the worship of the 
true God as manifested in Jesus Christ. 

Not Other Religions But the Christian 
Religion. 

All men who have read the history of 
the world with any care understand that 
the greatest curse of the world has been 
religions which were not Christian. A 
professor in a large and wealthy univer- 
sity recently said to me : "You cannot 
make the distinction between Christian- 
ity and religions stand." I was aston- 
ished at his remark. It exhibited an ig- 
norance which I did not suppose any 
person could be afflicted with in this age. 
As already noted, there is not a heathen 
country in the world where there are no 
temples, and where religions do not pre- 
vail. The great opponents of the Chris- 
tian religion have always been the priests 
of false faith. The representatives of a 
religion which was not Christianity were 
the men who hunted our Savior to the 
cross ; and the same sort of men with 
such variation as the times require, are 
doing the same sort of work today. 
The Lodge Bible Not the Christian Bible. 

There is perhaps no one thing which 

has deceived more careless thinkers, who 
have been entangled in lodgism, than the 
fact that on the altars of these lodges 
the Bible is frequently found. Men say, 
how can an organization be idolatrous 
when the Bible lies upon its altar? One 
should note here that as a temple is a 
building erected for the worship of a 
god or gods, so an altar is a place for 
the deposit of offerings to a god or gods ; 
and when we find altars in all Masonic 
bodies, we have another proof of the re- 
ligious character of these organizations. 
If they are not religious, what do they 
want with altars ? But this is aside ; let 
us return to the book that lies upon the 
altar. Does the Masonic system require 
the Christian Bible to lie upon the altar 
in a Masonic lodge? Evidently not. If 
the reader will turn again to Mackey's 



200 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912, 



"Masonic Ritualist/' page 59, he will 
learn what Bible the masonic system re- 
quires to lie upon the altar in the ma- 
sonic lodge. The writer here says that 
whatever may be the religious creed of 
a Mason, the revelation of deity which 
is recognized by his religion becomes his 
trestle board; that is to say, the rule by 
which he works. Thus the trestle board 
of the Jewish Mason is the Old Testa- 
ment, of the Christian both the Old and 
the New, of the Mohammedan the Ko- 
ran, etc., etc. He might have said that 
the "trestle board" of a Mormon Free- 
mason is the Book of Mormon, the trestle 
board of the Hindoo or Chinese or Per- 
sian or other heathen Freemason is the 
religious book which is recognized in his 
country. The Bible is used in Christian 
lands, not because Freemasonry believes 
in the Bible, but because the people do, 
and Freemasonry wishes to use the Bible 
to get the men. If the Koran was put 
upon the altar of a masonic lodge in a 
Christian country, the Christian people 
would not fellowship that organization. 
Putting the Bible there, those who> are 
uninformed respecting the facts in the 
case say : "Why we have the Bible, of 
course it is like the Church," but the or- 
ganization has no faith in the Bible and 
wherever the community does not force 
the Bible on the lodge some other book is 
laid upon the altar. This is another evi- 
dence and a sufficient one to a thoughtful 
man, to show that the god of Freema- 
sonry cannot be the God of the Bible. 

The Masonic Religion Not the Christian 
Religion. 

I meet gentlemen on the street con- 
nected with masonry, and I say to them, 
Is Masonry a Religion? One of them 
promptly answers, "Yes, it is plenty good 
enough for me. If I could live up to 
masonry I have no fear but I should go 
to heaven when I die." Another man 
says: "No, it is not a religion at all. 
That man is mistaken. He does not 



know what it is. He says it is a relig- 
ion, but it is not a religion at all. It is 
an insurance company. It is intended to 
help a man to put a little money where 
he can find it if he wants it. It is not a 
religion any more than a spade is a 
threshing machine. This man means all 
right, but he doesn't know." Another 
man says, "Freemasonry is not a religion, 
and it is not an insurance company, be- 
cause when a man joins the Masons he 
is not promised any money at all. He 
swears to help all Master Masons who 
need help around the world, and they 
swear to help him, but they do not prom- 
ise him money at all. Masonry is a so- 
cial organization. It is a place where 
kindred spirits meet to have a good time, 
and the aid is an incident." 

You may speak to a dozen men and 
get a different shade of answer from 
each of the twelve. 

I shall be compelled perhaps to weary 
you a little, but the only way to ascer- 
tain the facts is to appeal to the au- 
thorities. We will stand or fall on the 
question with these masonic witnesses. 

In Webb's "Masonic Monitor," in the 
article entitled "Religion" (it is in the 
second part of the Monitor consisting of 
a "Synopsis of Masonic Law" prepared 
by Robert Morris, an elder of the Pres- 
byterian church, who lived in Louisville, 
Kentucky, and was one of the principal 
Freemasons of the United States). On 
pages 284, 285 he says: 

''The meeting of a Masonic lodge is strictly 
a religious ceremony. So broad is the reli- 
gion of Masonry, and so carefully are all 
sectarian tenets excluded from the system, 
that the Christian, the Jew and the Moham- 
medan, in all their numberless sects and 
divisions, may and do harmoniously combine 
in its moral and intellectual work with the 
Buddhist, the Parsee, the Confucian, and the 
worshiper of Deity under every form." 

Robert Morris, the author of a "Syn- 
opsis of Masonic Law" says that. 

Open Mackey's" Lexicon of Free-Ma- 



November, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



201 



sonry." On page 402 you may read un- 
der the title "Religion" : 

"Free Masonry," says A. G. Mackey, "does 
not profess to interfere with the religious 
opinions of its members. It asks only for a 
declaration of that simple and universal faith 
in which men of all nations and all sects 
agree. — the belief in a God and in his super- 
intending providence. Beyond this, it does not 
venture, but leaves the minds of its disciples, 
on other and sectarian points, perfectly un- 
trammeled. This is the only religious quali- 
fication required of a candidate, but this is 
most strictly demanded. The religion, then, 
of Masonry, is pure Theism, on which its dif- 
ferent members engraft their own peculiar 
opinions, but they are not permitted to intro- 
duce them into the lodge, or to connect their 
truth or falsehood with the truth of Masonry." 

Now this gentleman clearly states that 
the religion of Masonry is "pure the- 
ism" ; that is, a belief in the existence of 
a god or gods. 

Now I wish you to read from the 
''Masonic Ritualist" by the same author, 
on page 22, under the subject "The 
Shock of Entrance" : 

"The lodge is, then, at the time of the re- 
ception of an Entered Apprentice, a symbol 
of the world, and the initiation is a type of 
the new life upon which the candidate is about 
to enter. There he stands (the candidate) 
without our portals, on the threshold of this 
new Masonic life, in darkness, helplessness 
and ignorance. Having been wandering amid 
the errors, and covered over with the pollu- 
tions of the outer and profane world, he comes 
inquiringly to our doors, seeking the new 
birth and asking a withdrawal of the veil 
which conceals Divine truth from his unini- 
tiated sight.' 

This is what the candidate is doing 
when he comes into the Masonic lodge 
for the first time. He is in blindness, 
darkness, helplessness and ignorance, and 
is wandering among the errors, is cov- 
ered with the pollutions of the outer 
world, and is seeking the new life and 
asking for the withdrawal of the veil 
which withholds Divine Truth from his 
eyes. 

On the 39th page of this same masonic 



Ritual we have some of the words re- 
specting the initiation into this degree 
about which you have been reading. You 
read about what the candidate was doing 
when he came to the door for the first 
time ; now read some of the things which 
are said to him after he gets inside the 
lodge. Please remember this is not se- 
cret work, this is open work furnished 
by the authority of the lodge. 

The lodge says to this candidate in the 
Entered Apprentice degree : 

"The Common Gavel is an instrument made 
use of by operative Masons to break off the 
corners of rough stones, the better to fit them 
for the builder's use ; but we, as Free and 
Accepted Masons, are taught to make use of 
it for the more noble and glorious purpose of 
divesting our hearts and consciences of all 
the vices and superfluities of life ; thereby 
fitting our minds as living stones, for that 
spiritual building, that house 'not made with 
hands, eternal in the heavens.' " 

In a note explaining the latter he goes 
on to say : 

"The Speculative Mason is engaged in the 
construction of a spiritual temple in his heart, 
pure and spotless, fit for the dwelling-place 
of Him who is the author of purity ; where 
God is to be worshiped in spirit and in truth, 
and whence every evil thought and unruly 
passion are to be banished, as the sinner and 
the Gentile were excluded from the sanctu- 
ary of the Jewish Temple. In the symbolic 
language of Masonry, therefore, the twenty- 
four-inch gauge is a symbol of time well em- 
ployed ; the common gavel, of the purification 
of the heart." 

I wish you would read from the 109th 
page of this same book. I am afraid this 
will be a little tiresome, but the only way 
to know what the authorities teach in 
regard to Freemasonry is to find out. 
There is no way of learning without tak- 
ing time to ascertain. 

"It was the simple object of all the ancient 
rites and mysteries practiced in the very bosom 
of pagan darkness, shining as a solitary beacon 
in all that surrounding gloom, and cheering 
the philosopher in his weary pilgrimage of 
life, to teach the immortality of the soul. 
This is still the great design of the third de- 



202 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



gree of Masonry. This is the scope and aim 
of its Ritual. The Master Mason represents 
man, when youth, manhood, old age, and life 
itself have passed away as fleeting shadows, 
yet raised from the grave of iniquity, and 
quickened into another and a better existence. 
By its legend and all its ritual, it is implied 
that we have been redeemed from the death 
of sin and the sepulchre of pollution. The 
ceremonies and the lecture beautifully illus- 
trate this all-engrossing subject; and the con- 
clusion we arrive at is that youth, properly 
directed, leads us to honorable and virtuous 
maturity, and that the life of man, regulated 
by morality, faith, and justice, will be re- 
warded at its closing hour by the prospect of 
eternal bliss." 

I will ask you to read a brief extract 
from page 238 of this same work. It is 
from the burial service which is pro- 
nounced by the authorities of the lodge 
over all members who die in good and 
regular standing in the order, and have 
taken three degrees in Masonry : 

"Unto the grave," the Master says, "we 
have resigned the body of our deceased 
brother, there to remain until the general res- 
urrection, in favorable expectation that his 
immortal soul may then partake of the joys 
which have been prepared for the righteous 
from the beginning of the world. And may 
Almighty God, of His infinite goodness, at 
the grand tribunal of unbiased justice, extend 
His mercy to him and all of us, and crown 
our hope with everlasting bliss in the realms 
of a boundless eternity." 

In Sickles' " 'Ahiman Rezon" the ex- 
tract selected has to do with prayer 
only. The books have many prayers in 
them. I have read sixty-five prayers at 
a single sitting printed for the use of 
members in the different masonic bodies. 
Here we have a prayer to be used at 
opening: 

"Most holy and glorious Lord God, the great 
maker of the Universe, the giver of all good 
and graces, Thou hast promised that where 
two or three are gathered together in Thy 
name, Thou will be in the midst and bless 
them. In Thy name we have assembled, and 
in Thy name we desire to proceed in all our 
doings. Grant that the sublime principles of 
Masonry may be substituted for discontent 



and passion, and that the lodge at this time 
may reflect the love and purity which are for- 
ever before Thy throne." 

I will ask you whether or not it is not 
perfectly fair and just for me to use 
these books representing Masonry, the 
mother and model of all secret societies, 
save and except Jesuitism alone? They 
represent the candidate as coming to seek 
for a religious change. He seeks the new 
birth, and asks the removal of the veil 
that withholds divine light from his eyes. 
These books teach that the man that 
comes into this organization and accepts 
its teaching will live a worthy life; that 
he will purify his heart until it becomes 
a fit temple for the indwelling of the 
Holy Ghost, and when he has gotten 
through with his life and passes out from 
this world he passes into eternal bliss. 
Now is that not a fair statement ? 

If that is a fair statement, then we 
ought to have done with the idea that 
this secret society system, which counts 
its members by millions, which erects 
temples in every city like this, which 
erects halls and lodges in every smaller 
city, which is soliciting the membership 
of every young man who is sound in 
body and has money enough to pay to 
get in and to pay his dues after he gets 
in, is a trifling matter. It is a great re- 
ligious organization, and all the other or- 
ganizations which have sprung from it, 
and are modeled after it, so far as they 
are copied from this mother organiza- 
tion, are of the same sort, professing to 
give men the new birth, to teach men 
how to live, professing to teach men the 
way of life. These are the men' that rule 
Masonry and they ought to know it, if 
anyone does. 

In 1,500 lodges prayers like this which 
you have read are offered week by week, 
often by men who make no profession 
to Christianity at all. No mention of 
confession of sin, no mention of Christ, 
no mention of the Holy Spirit, who 



November, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



203 



makes sin known to sinful hearts. Thou- 
sands of men hearing these prayers read, 
are saying that these prayers are every bit 
as good as they have at the churches ; 
and these men believe if they live and 
die in good standing with the lodges with 
which they are connected they are going 
to heaven. They say to themselves : 
When we came and were initiated we 
were born again. The veil that held 
divine truth from our eyes was drawn 
away and now we can see divine truth, 
we can divide our time as we ought to 
do and give one-third to God and one- 
third to business and one-third to sleep. 
Our hearts are not exactly right, but we 
learn to cleanse them ourselves, and now, 
when we come to die, we will lie down in 
the hope that we will wake in the regions 
of the Holy One. No repentence for 
sin; no confession of sin; no faith in 
Christ ; no faith in the true God ; no 
faith in the Holy Spirit — the very things 
which Christ makes esential to salvation ! 
The Holy Spirit says that sort of 
thing is the worship of demons ; and the 
Holy Spirit says Christian people ought 
not to have fellowship with demons. 

Who or What Is the Masonic God? 
Evidently he is not the Christian God, 
for in the first place if he were, there 
would be no need of a Masonic Temple. 
We have, as already indicated, plenty of 
places in our cities and towns for the 
worship of the Christian God already. 
In fact, as just noted, we have too many, 
rather than too few. Still further the 
creed of Freemasonry shows that the 
god of Freemasonry cannot be the Chris- 
tian's God. Jesus Himself said "No man 
cometh to the Father but by Me." The 
Holy Spirit says "He that abides in the 
doctrine of Christ, the same has both the 
Father and the Son." It therefore is evi- 
dent, from the creed, as well as from the 
practical situation, that the masonic god 
cannot be the Christian's God. This 



fact, which is doubly proved already, is 
susceptible of further evidence. First 
the reason of the case, and the alleged 
creed show that the Masonic god cannot 
be the Christian's God, so also the Ritual 
of the Masonic bodies clearly evidences 
the same fact. In the Blue Lodge the 
prayers and lectures do not contain the 
name of Jesus Christ at all. The same 
thing is true in the Chapter. So intent 
have been the Chapter authorities to rid 
themselves of the name of Jesus Christ, 
that they have even stricken it from the 
Scripture readings which they use in the 
Mark Masters degree, and in the de- 
gree of the Holy Royal Arch, as they 
call it. Persons in doubt respecting this 
matter will be able to satisfy themselves 
by consulting Mackey's "Masonic Rit- 
ualist/' pages 271 and 348. The quota- 
tions are from 1 Pet. 2 15 and from 2 
Thes. 3 :6-i6. In these Scriptures, the 
name of Jesus Christ occurs three times, 
and in the Chapter readings it is stricken 
out each time. In the Lodge of Perfec- 
tion, the Consistory and the Scottish 
Rite bodies generally the name of Jesus 
Christ does not occur, though He is evi- 
dently alluded to, but never with respect ; 
alw r ays with a hostility more or less 
clearly revealed. The Commandery does 
use in its ritual the name of Jesiis Christ, 
but in such a connection as to horrify 
every Christian heart. In the taking of 
the fifth libation, when the Knight Tem- 
plar is required to drink pure wine from 
a human skull, he calls upon God to 
doubly damn his soul if he does not re- 
main true to the Order. "May the sins 
of him whose skull this was. be laid upon 
me, in addition to my own, should I ever 
prove wilfully untrue," etc.. etc. It is 
obvious that such a mention of the 
Savior, as we have here in the Knight 
Templar's degree, is not an honor, but 
an insult, and that Knight Templarism 
in fact is like all other Freemasonry in 
that the god which it worships is not the 



204 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



Christian's God. The Christian's God 
has never set men to drinking wine out 
of the skulls of human beings like them- 
selves, and praying God to doubly damn 
their souls if they do not remain true to 
a secret society. 

The Roman Pantheon. 

When Christianity made its way into 
the Roman Empire the first thought of 
that mighty nation was that Christianity 
was a form of religion like the many re- 
ligions which the conquered provinces 
contained. They were willing to give a 
place in their Pantheon to the Christian's 
God ; they were willing to set Him up 
alongside of Jupiter and Saturn and the 
deities of the further East, but when 
they learned that the claim of the Chris- 
tian religion was exclusive, that Christ 
was not to be put on a shelf with a lot 
of other gods, but claimed supreme pow- 
er, and demanded the abolition of the 
worship of these pagan deities, then the 
block and the stake and the cross were 
invoked to crush out what they called 
"the malignant superstition." 

We therefore see that the masonic god 
must be like the gods of Rome — a gen- 
eral god who admits no particular claims 
for anybody, but who demands that all 
gods should be treated alike, and that 
all holy books should be treated alike. 
The Christian Bible may be used in a 
Christian country, the works of Confu- 
cius in a Chinese lodge, the Zend-Avesta 
in a Persian lodge, etc., etc. 

Lodge Morals and Christian Morals. 

If it is true that a Masonic Temple is 
not a building for the worship of the 
Christian God, and that the Masonic 
altar is not a place for offerings to the 
Christian God, and if the religion of the 
Masonic Temple is that universal re- 
ligion in which all men agree, and not 
the Christian faith in which all men do 
not agree, it is obvious that the morals 
of the Lodge and the Temple must be 



different from the morals of the Church. 
The most superficial examination proves 
that this supposition is true, and that the 
morals of the Christian Church differ in 
the most marked and complete manner 
from the morals of the Masonic Temple. 

Before the ritual of Masonry was so 
generally revealed as it is at this time, 
ignorant Freemasons used to insist that 
no one could know the Ritual of the 
Masonic lodge without becoming con- 
nected with it. At the present time the 
revelations of the unwritten work have 
become so common that no Freemason, 
who is ordinarily truthful and fairly in- 
telligent, repeats that old falsehood. I 
do not stop to argue the case, I simply 
assume that my readers are honest men. 
if they be lodge men, and that they will 
not deny what they know to be true. So 
much understood, I proceed to a brief 
examination of lodge morals as com- 
pared with Christian morals, and I re- 
mind the thoughtful reader that he will 
find the lodge morals of his age to agree 
precisely with the pagan morals of 
heathen lands and religions of long ago. 

The essential thing in Christian morals 
is that men are to live in the presence 
of a pure and holy God, pure and holy 
lives. This is in brief, the only require- 
ment. Remember that you are created by. 
have been redeemed by and are respon- 
sible to a pure and holy God, and are to 
live accordingly. This is the teaching 
of the Christian faith. It is obvious that 
such a faith is universal in 'its require- 
ments. It does not permit a man to do 
a wrong or dishonorable act in one place, 
or to one person, and forbid him to do 
that dishonorable act in another place 
or to another person. He must live a 
pure and holy life in the presence of a 
pure and holy God. If he does not make 
it the purpose of his life thus to live, 
he is not a Christian at all, but he is a 
child of Satan and in danger of hell fire. 



November. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



205 



The moment one passes to the exami- 
nation of masonic morals he finds that 
they are totally different in character. I 
do not now speak of the lectures, but of 
the obligations. "It is the obligation which 
makes the Mason/ 3 and the obligation 
of the Mason is to Masons and the rela- 
tives of Masons, and not to other people. 
The very name by which persons who 
are not Masons are called, is an evidence 
of this fact. The lodge name for such 
a wife or child or neighbor or brother in 
the Church is '"Profane"; and the lodge 
rituals tell us that in masonic bodies, as 
in the old pagan temples, one of the first 
things required is that all the Profane 
depart. This would seem to be an in- 
sult directed at the whole human race 
which has not yet been initiated into ma- 
sonic degrees. Of course if those who 
are not connected with the masonic lodge 
are Profane, they may be treated dif- 
ferently from those who are not Pro- 
fane; and this we find to be the clear. 
decisive and continuous teaching of the 
Order. I solemnly promise and swear 
that I will not rob a Mason or a lodge. 
I solemnly promise and swear that I will 
not speak evil of a Master Mason be- 
fore his face or behind his back. I sol- 
emnly promise and swear that I will not 
have illicit, carnal intercourse with a 
Master Mason's wife, mother, sister or 
daughter, knowing them to be such. etc.. 
etc. What does all this mean ? Does 
this sound like the Ten Commandments 
or the teachings of Jesus Christ? Xo 
man who has a particle of sense and a 
small remnant of honesty will affirm it 
for a moment. It is totally different so 
far as morals are concerned. This does 
not prove that it is not the correct form, 
it simply shows that it is not the Chris- 
tion form, and we who are Christians 
of course must dissent from it. We can- 
not retain our Christian profession and 
admit that Christian morals are imper- 



fect. If the Christian system is from 
God, is the divine system, then Christian 
morals are what should prevail through- 
out the world. 

This clear and obvious inference from 
lodge obligations is confirmed when we 
take up the study of the penalties — 
throats cut across,, tongues torn out. 
hearts and vitals removed, bodies cut 
asunder, bowels burned to ashes, hands 
smitten off, the tops of skulls smitten off. 
heads smitten off, etc., etc. Are these 
the teachings of the gentle Jesus ? They 
do not sound like it. Even- Christian 
man knows that they do not belong un- 
der that category. Jesus Christ never 
imposed penalties of that kind on His 
people. His churches never have done 
so. Only emissaries of Satan have thus 
bandied about slaughter-house penalties 
of this kind. If some man should say : 
"I am a Freemason and I never took any 
of these penalties," all that is to be said 
is that he is not a Freemason, or else that 
he is a liar. There are clandestine 
lodges, and in these lodges at times the 
degrees may not be accurately conferred. 
There are men who are made Masons "at 
sight/'' or in short form, who may not 
repeat the obligations and penalties en- 
tire, but that the penalties of the obliga- 
tion are as indicated above every fairly 
intelligent Mason know>, and no honest 
Mason denies. 

What Will You Do About It? 
When it is proposed to erect Masonic 
Temples dedicated to the worship of the 
Masonic God and to teach Masonic mor- 
als, under Masonic penalties, what is the 
duty of Christian people? In the first 
place it is their duty to have no fellow- 
ship with such unfruitful works of dark- 
ness. Men of the world who belong to 
Satan by choice, though they belong to 
God by right, may perhaps find fellow- 
ship in organizations of this kind : but 
men who know Tesus Christ and live bv 



206 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



His teaching, have no part or lot in a 
thing of this kind. 2 Cor. 6:14-18 is de- 
cisive. A man in the Fulton Street 
Prayer meeting once said to me that 
that Scripture pulled him out of nineteen 
different secret societies. 

In the second place, it is the clear and 
obvious duty of Christian people to bear 
testimony against the god and oaths and 
morals and penalties of this kind. Jesus 
Christ said that men who loved Him 
would be hated by the world. Is the 
average minister, the average church 
member, in our time hated by the world ? 
I do not believe anybody will affirm it. 
If not, why not? Jesus Christ gave the 
reason clearly. He said, The world can- 
not hate you, but the world hates me, 
because I testify of it, that it is evil. 
Wherever you have this testimony, you 
will have the answering hatred of the 
world. It is unspeakably pitiful to see 
the sons of Balaam in our time seeking 
to avoid the hatred of the world by 
neglecting to bear testimony against the 
sins which are destroying the homes, the 
bodies and the souls of men. We are not 
to judge them unkindly, but they assume 
a frightful responsibility and we should 
warn them that except they repent — as 
Balaam died among the enemies of God 
so they will perish. 

Third, it is obvious that a Christian 
man has no right to put money or time 
or work into the support of an organiza- 
tion so clearly unchristian. As I must 
be a Christian altogether, or not at all, 
so must I refuse to support in any way 
such an organization. 

A Word in Conclusion. 

I wish to say this last word to my 
friends who are in the Masonic lodge. 
It has been my good fortune to know 
many men, who had been deceived into 
this system, as personal friends; and I 
am glad to believe that no honest man 
among them all ever doubted my sin- 



cerity in the teaching of the last forty 
years. I have seen scores, I think hun- 
dreds of men abandon these pagan tem- 
ples, these false gods, with their blood 
curdling oaths, their display, their ap- 
peals to vanity and to ambition. Why 
should not the Christian men who have 
become connected with these organiza- 
tions, when they see what they actually 
are, and what they are really doing — 
with their banquets and their dances and 
their oaths and their penalties — why 
should not Christian men say at once 
and forever, without qualification : "The 
lodge must change or we abandon it." 
Why should a Christian fellowship an 
organization which shuts his wife and 
his children out; which shuts his Savior 
out ; which shuts his church brethren, 
who are poor, blind, halt or maimed out ; 
and which admits Jews, Mohammedans, 
Buddhists, Parsees, Confucianists and 
worshippers of deity in every form ; 
what part or lot has any Christian man 
in an organization like this? As I look 
into my heart I find there nothing but a 
real and Christian affection for my 
brethren, whom I now address. I es- 
teem them for the many good things 
which God has wrought in them through 
Jesus Christ our Lord, and I entreat 
them to read once more, 2 Cor. sixth 
chapter, verses 14 to 18, and to do the 
things which' the Holy Spirit there re- 
quires. In His Name, 

Charles A. Blanchard. 
Wheaton, Illinois. 



Blessed is the man that waiketh not in 
the counsel of the ungodly, nor stand- 
eth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in 
the seat of the scornful. — Ps. i: 1. 



Be ye not unequally yoked together 
with unbelievers ; for what fellowship 
hath righteousness with unrighteous- 
ness? and what communion hath light 
with darkness? 



November, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



207 



THE PLAY AND THE CANDLE. 

In July, 1904, the Odd Fellows Com- 
panion published an article with the 
heading, ''The cost of the affair," and in 
this discussion of cost gave a glimpse of 
the financial problems met by joiners. It 
should be borne in mind that the article 
is from the pen of a secret society editor, 
and is addressed to subscribers of a se- 
cret society organ. Let the reader im- 
agine himself the guest of a lodge just 
when business is before the meeting, and 
let him try for the moment to forget that 
he is reading the Cynosure. 

The Cost of the Affair. 

The Sovereign Grand Lodge invited it- 
self to meet in San Francisco in September 
next. The Odd Fellows of that jurisdic- 
tion were not exerting themselves to have 
this great body of the order cross the con- 
tinent so they could spend a number of 
thousands of dollars in showing the order 
and the world how glad they were to have 
them travel thousands of miles to the 
"Golden Shore." The Californians wanted 
the supreme body of Knights of Pythias to 
visit them in 1902 and offered to pay twen- 
ty-five thousand dollars for the show. 
Neither the "Native Sons" nor "the Argo- 
nauts" cared to entertain the "Sovereigns" 
in 1904, for the reason that the Knights 
Templars' Triennial Conclave had been in- 
vited to enjoy their hospitality at about 
that date and the expenses of their enter- 
tainment, which were expected to be great, 
were to be provided for, and many thou- 
sands of dollars have been gathered for 
that purpose. 

The Californians, and the San Francis- 
cans especially, had expected to "lay them- 
selves out" to entertain the great Templar 
gathering, and that was about all they de- 
sired to do in one season. But our "Sov- 
ereigns" wanted to go to San Francisco 
and so voted. In order to treat their self- 
invited guests decently, the Odd Fellows of 
California got together — Grand Lodge, sub- 
ordinates, Patriarchs, Rebekahs — and have 
arranged to do the best they can on the 
occasion. But comparison of the arrange- 
ments for entertaining the Knights Tem- 
plar September 4 to 10, and the Odd Fel- 
lows the week beginning the 19th, cannot 
but be other than to the disadvantage of 
the latter. Another year the whole phase 
of the affair would be changed. But the 
die is cast, and now things will have to be 
taken as they develop. 

Another feature that will probably be 
looked into with much interest by the rank 
and file will be the cost of the pleasure 
trip. The expense of the meeting at Balti- 
more amounted to $31,701.90. The miles 
traveled to get there aggregated 28.380. 
The mileage to San Francisco will be about 
1.016,642 miles. This is easily figured at 
the rate of 10 cents a mile, the usual rate 



allowed by this body, and with six days' 
per diem at $5.00 can be reckoned to be 
one of the most costly communications 
this body ever held. When the -Sovereign 
Grand Lodge comes to cost the order over 
a hundred thousand dollars, if past rates 
are to prevail, the commoner from the 
"back district" will gaze upon it with awe 
— if nothing else. 



GUARDIANS OF LIBERTY. 

Editor The Christian Cynosure: 

My Dear Sir : It has been my pleas- 
ure to read several issues of the Chris- 
tian Cynosure. My smypathies are with 
you. It is a serious and difficult task 
you have undertaken, but clothed with 
the right that makes might, I am confi- 
dent that you will live to see an awak- 
ened conscience of the American people. 

In your last number, you told us that 
it was your opinion that the "Guardians 
of Liberty" were not a secret order. I 
believe I am in possession of informa- 
tion, which if it does not cause the op- 
posers of secret societies to condemn the 
said organization, will yet cause them to 
hesitate and wait for more light before 
joining or approving the order. 

Let me first give expression to my sin- 
cere approval of the Declaration of Prin- 
ciples of the Guardians of Liberty, and 
to my belief that a national movement is 
necessary to oppose the encroachment of 
those who are enemies of such principles. 
I believe that these principles are really 
in danger, and I am with those who ac- 
tively agree with the "Guardians" as to 
the source of this danger. Therefore, my 
criticisms are not made in a spirit of 
cavil, but with a clear mind, I hope, and 
a heart burning with desire to contend 
for our liberties. But only those are 
truly patriotic, who are wisely patriotic, 
and I fear that the zeal of the founders 
of the "Guardians" has caused them to 
follow very unwise methods. 

My fear is that (1) this organization 
will defeat its ends, or that (2) by or 
though gaining its aim, it will establish 
evils scarcely less grevious than the ones 
it is determined to eradicate. 

The "Guardians" will defeat their own 
purpose because of their secrecv. To 
prove that they are secret in their deal- 
ings I have a letter from Mr. P. Corning 



208 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



Edwards, Deputy Chief Recorder, which 
explains itself. 
"Dear Sir : 

"Replying — we beg" to say that the or- 
der is not secret further than that the 
names of members are not made public, 
nor can those other than members at- 
tend meetings for the above reason." 

So their meetings are secret. Furth- 
ermore the spirit of secrecy in all things 
is bred by them in other ways. Notice 
the title of officers : Chief Guardian, 
Chief Attorney, Chief Recorder, Chief 
Custodian, Chief Vigilant ; in local courts 
Master Guardian, etc. They have "cere- 
monial services," as can be learned from 
the announcement of C G. Haines, that 
certain Mass. courts should give the ad- 
dress of their Master Recorder, so that 
ceremonial services can be sent to them. 
(American Citizen of August 31 and 
September 7th, 1912.) It is the only 
newspaper containing official utterances 
of the National Court, Guardians of Lib- 
erty." 

Then observe their manner of secur- 
ing members : During the intervening- 
period, the applicants should earnestly, 
carefully but energetically canvass for 
membership among those, who, in their 
opinion would make good members. 
("Instructions for formation of local 
courts"). Finally look at the personnel 
of the Advisory Board, over half of 
which are high officers in lodges. All this 
will engender and nourish a spirit of se- 
crecy and lodgism. 

Now leaving out of consideration the 
arguments that can be made against so- 
cieties that are undoubtedly and fully se- 
cret, I will restrict myself to the facts in 
this particular case. 

Why are the names of members kept 
secret? Because, it is said, it is neces- 
sary to protect the sustenance and life 
of members from Catholic persecution. 
Well, say I, let them persecute. What 
better propaganda of principles could we 
have? The "Guardians" desire to pro- 
mote pure patriotism. But what is the 
test of pure patriotism? It is to come 
out bravely, against all odds and uphold 
the principles upon which the country 
is founded. I greatly fear that teaching 
people to deliver a blow to the enemies 
of the country from behind a screen, will 
beget cowardice. The members, if once 



confronted by the enemy with the fact 
that it is known that they belong to a 
society which will not let its membership 
list be known — such members will be 
confounded and unnerved for further 
battle. May this not explain some of the 
recent withdrawals of noted men from 
the Guardians of Liberty? 

History shows in this country that a 
secret society can never long have a big 
sway in politics, at least not such as has 
a noble aim. We ought to have learned 
that much from the disaster to the 
Know-Nothing party and' the A. P. A. 

In a secret- meeting, even though the 
biggest cowards could be constrained 
from great boasting, still the claims of 
the conservative side are never fully 
presented. And the inevitable result is 
that excesses and unwise moves will oc- 
cur and destroy the whole work. The 
Menace and the American Citizen are 
doing much good, but there is often a 
lamentable lack of clear judgment and 
foresight and many rushings into the ex- 
treme. If this can occur with persons in 
cases where they will be held responsi- 
ble before the bar of public opinion, 
what will occur if the parties know that 
possibly nobody will find out what intem- 
perance they have committed in speech or 
action. 

I have heard it stated that secrecy 
must be fought with secrecy ; that some 
secret body must eventually take up the 
war against the political activities of the 
Romish church, but I can not believe it. 
These people are too willing to believe 
that this struggle must end in a war. 
Then secrecy would be necessary. Not 
bullets but ballots can and should settle 
it. And to get enough ballots they will 
eventually be forced to come out with 
their accusations and intentions before 
the whole public. 

It seems to me, the "Guardians" with 
their secret membership are bungling the 
affair. Even granting that the Catholics 
have 15,000,000 inhabitants, Non-Cath- 
olics have 85,000,000. If these are en- 
couraged to step up and demand their 
rights before the world, individually and 
collectively, each taking the responsibil- 
ity for his action, the arrogant Catholic 
minority would be overwhelmed. The 
secrecy of the "Guardians" will defeat 
their object. 



November, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



209 



Their inconsistency will defeat their 
object. The "Guardians" do not num- 
ber more than 600,000, I am sure. 
Therefore they must recruit millions be- 
fore they can be sure of sufficient 
strength. But after the first impulse, 
the natural judgment of men, influenced 
by what is heard in just criticism and 
unjust slander, will cause the people to 
pass judgment on the value of the or- 
ganization with greater nicety than now. 
How will this society stand when its con- 
sistency in putting its principles into ac- 
tion is concerned? Masons are in the 
highest counsels. Have they "no supe- 
rior temporal allegiance than their obli- 
gations to the principles of the Constitu- 
tion of the United States ?" Are the Ma- 
sons really determined that every citi- 
zen shall exercise these rights and priv- 
ileges unmolested? Do the court records 
show it? Have we forgotten the times of 
Morgan? But this organization is 
strongly represented by many lodges — 
whole lodges it is said, having gone over 
to the "Guardians." Now how will this 
inconsistency help it? Who with open 
eyes will join it? But if the "Guardians" 
cannot get sufficient members, they will 
fail in their own efforts and hinder the 
wiser efforts of others. 

Granting that the "Guardians" could 
crush the political power of the Romish 
hierarchy, would that not mean that 
those who were most instrumental, 
would be given the helm of the ship of 
state — that is would not the highest lodge 
members seize the positions of power and 
influence? What is the benefit of es- 
caping one secret organization and run- 
ning into the hands of others? Is it our 
privilege simply to choose between the 
"Devil and the deep sea?" If we choose 
the "Guardians" we will have taken to 
the deep sea possibly, and will still have 
left to us the Devil. There is a better 
way ! 

I could give the arguments against 
the Guardians of Liberty which their 
Constitution suggests, but I must no 
longer transgress on your patience. 

It is not impossible that by a lack of 
knowledge of all facts I am judging the 
order too harshly. I sincerely wish that 
this were the case, for nothing grieves 
me more than to see an organization 
with such noble principles acting so un- 



wisely and inconsistently. But judging 
from what information can be gotten be- 
fore joining, I firmly believe that I have 
judged the Guardians of Liberty justly. 

Let us hope, Mr. Phillips, that we may 
soon have an organization that has all 
the good qualities of the Guardians of 
Liberty and none of its faults. I am sure 
such a one is not impossible. 

Yours very respectfully, 

Walter Schlaraetzki. 

Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, Sept. 
20th, 1912. 



"OH CONSISTENCY!" 

The trustees of our High School in 
Oklahoma City, Okla., recently took very 
positive action against "fraternities" and 
"sororities." Such action was intended 
to completely and perpetually eliminate 
these secret orders from our High 
School. This action was" right, wise, 
necessary, and popular. 

The secret society system is a curse 
to the High School. Who, knowing the 
facts, would dare to deny that statement ? 
Now let us be true to logic and true to 
fact. Do you say Yes ? The secret so- 
ciety system is a curse to the college 
Yes ? Come on : the secret lodge system 
is a curse to society. Yes ? Let us pro- 
gress. The secret society system in toto 
ought to be abandoned and abolished. 
"It must be so, Plato, thou reasonest 
well !" 

Oh consistency! Our High School 
management eliminated secret societies 
from the school. Good! But the sym- 
bols of Freemasonry are carved on "the 
black marble corner stone of our magnifi- 
cent white marble High School building. 
— the Masonic symbols grin at the High 
School management ; grin at the High 
School teachers and students ; grin at all 
of us ! Oh consistency ! 

By what right or with what propriety 
are these Masonic symbols on our High 
School building? Answer who can! 
Our High School is a civic institution. 
Why then are symbols of Freemasonry 
on the corner stone of our High School 
building? "Fraternities" and "sorori- 
ties" excluded from our High School. 
Good ! But when this good action was 
taken by our school authorities the walls 
of our High School building: must have 
bulged out with laughter. "Oh. ho. ha, 



10 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



ha, consistency!" It would probably be a 
bit embarrassing" to our High School 
management, if the students should pre- 
sent this proper and appropriate question 
to them for solution : 

"Why are Masonic symbols on our 
High School building?" 

Listen ! Every stone in our High 
School building is a voice crying out to 
the Freemasons to erase their symbols 
from its cornerstone. 

Very sincerely, 

(Rev.) J. R. Millin. 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 



IbttomL 



BRIGHTENING DEFENSIVE ARMOR. 

The approach of winter suggests pre- 
paredness for whatever may be said 
about Washington as a Mason, for the 
last month of winter brings the anniver- 
sary of his birth, the first one, that of 
his death, and the month last preceding 
the season the date of his initiation. It 
is well to begin early to renew knowl- 
edge and freshen acquaintance with facts 
useful in the refutation of Masonic fic- 
tions about Washington. 

In learning or using truths relating to 
this subject, it is wise, though not in- 
dispensable, to follow guides who have 
already traced the line of truth. They 
can at least encourage their followers to 
expect light, and they can also point out 
a way to seek for desired illumination. 
Besides this, by distinct announcement 
of the results of their own researches 
they can actually instruct. It is wise to 
hear what they say. 

To do no more than this, however, is 
to do less than some of these teachers 
themselves have done. If it is useful to 
listen to their words summing up their 
own studies, it must also be profitable to 
follow their example in pursuing those 
studies. Dr. Blanchard, for instance, in- 
dicates this example by basing his pam- 
phlet entitled Washington largely on the 
testimony of a Masonic biographer who 
aims to write for members of the order. 
The little memorandum of dates reprint- 
ed from the Cynosure of January, 191 1, 
as a tract entitled, "Washington ; What 
kind of a Mason was he?" was almost 
wholly derived from Masonic sources. 



This is an effective method. To accept 
testimony to facts from an opposing wuV 
ness, and then deduce your own unde- 
niable conclusions from them, is a pow- 
erful method of fixing conviction. ''Out 
of the eater came forth meat and out 
of the strong came forth sweetness." To 
show that antagonistic proof is actual 
disproof, is overwhelming refutation. 
Such erasure of extravagant Masonic 
claims concerning Washington is worth 
having and can be had. 

Appeal to Washington himself must 
not be omitted. Among Masons he is 
one who provides information about him- 
self. If some Mason attempts to claim 
that he was grand master at a certain 
time, he will not only give assurance 
that he was not, but will add, besides, 
that he was not any kind of master, and 
had not even been warden. In prepar- 
ing to answer what some Mason may try 
to say about Washington, no one should 
neglect to know what he himself actually 
did say about Washington. 

These are hints at some things which 
will brighten a disputant's defensive ar- 
mor. It is safer to be always prepared, 
because no man is more liable to be ap- 
pealed to in defense or exculpation of 
Masonry, though comparatively few ini- 
tiates seem to have had much less to do 
with Masonry. One should not fall back 
on nothing but the bare statement of stu- 
dents of the subject ; he should qualify 
himself to cite or quote proof. It is not 
enough to utter a bare proposition which 
can at once be offset by a Mason with a 
counter proposition. In that case, his 
antagonist has an advantage that need 
not be allowed ; for he holds the position 
of one who is presumed to know, while 
his opponent fails to take the trouble of 
going' out of the position of one who 
does not appear to know. It would be 
unfortunate to make the Masons and 
others take sides in appearance, so that 
all members should seem to be on one 
side, showing a solid front to all of con- 
trary opinion concerning certain claims 
relating to Washington. Such is not the 
actual case. Masons who really know, 
contradict Masons who do not know, 
and who are clearly contradicted by that 
Mason to whom must be attributed per- 
fect knowledge — that is, by Washington. 
We ought to keep ourselves prepared to 
take sides with him. 



November, 191. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



211 



GREAT SWELLING WORDS. 

"It is high time that Masonic educators 
commenced to pay some attention to the teach- 
ings of the institution and, instead of teaching 
perfection in ritual, impart a little instruction 
along the line of right conduct. Masonry 
should set up a new system of merit and give 
commissions with title of Right Worshipful to 
those who are found proficient in moral up- 
rightness and deeds of charity. It is to be 
hoped that the Freemason with wide influence 
for good will escape the mania of the present 
time and impress the Craft of Illinois with the 
truth that the wording of our ritual is the ve- 
hicle which makes men better, and that the 
great man in Masonry is not he who by oracu- 
lar powers, but he who by foot, knee, breast, 
hand and cheek assists his fellow man." — N. Y. 
Z., in Illinois Freemason. 



he finds people not sufficiently enlight- 
ened, according to his standard, to in- 
clude these so early among Sunday ex- 
ercises like ball games. 



A prominent Mason living in Texas 
attended a funeral which he thought too 
few other Masons attended, but instead 
of "dropping into poetry" he dropped a 
few resolutions somewhere, which read 
in part as follows : 

"Whereas, It is the duty of every good 
Mason to uphold the good name and 
fame of masonry ; and 

"Whereas, On week-days the brethren 
are either tired, busy, or it rains or 
shines too much ; and 

"Whereas, It is too much trouble to 
dress in their best clothes during the 
week-days ; therefore, be it 

"Resolved, That it is hereby declared 
the duty of any member of this lodge. 
hereafter, to die only on Saturdays, so 
as to be buried on Sunday." 

But on how many Saturdays should 
"any member" die? 

A NEW SCHEDULE. 
Here is the new schedule for Sunday 
issued by Rev. Arthur Wilson, pastor 
of the Unitarian church of Our Father 
at Newburgh, N. Y. : "Go to church 
in the morning, and in the afternoon go 
to the countryside, see a baseball game, 
play tennis or go fishing. In the evening 
rest, read and get acquainted with your 
family." W r e would like to see his week- 
day schedule, though without seeing it 
we can distinguish a vacant space where 
it does not mention a prayer meeting. 
Probably the lodge appointments follow 
those of the lodges themselves, yet we 
wonder how many of them are included 
in his list. Perhaps the dances, card, 
and theatre parties, not scheduled for 
Sundav, are left for the week because 



"A SARCASTIC BUT PERTINENT RES- 
OLUTION." 

"A prominent Mason of Texas, after a slim- 
ly attended funeral, in substance offered the 
following resolution : 

Whereas, It is the duty of every good Mason 
to uphold the good name and fame of Ma- 
sonry ; and 

Whereas, On week days the brethren are 
either tired, busy, or it rains or shines too 
much ; and 

Whereas, It is too much trouble to dress in 
their best clothes during the week days ; there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That it is hereby declared the duty 
of any member of this Lodge hereafter to die 
only on Saturdays, so as to be buried on Sun- 
day, that the Lodge may turn out in full 
strength and pay the proper respect to his 
memory. — Texas Freemason. 

The foregoing is equally pertinent to Odd 
Fellows."' — The O. F. Companion. 

Air. Any Member ought, moreover, to 
give the lodge due notice beforehand 
which Saturdays would be agreeable to 
him, so that arrangements could be made 
to forestall interference and secure a 
convenient date for dying. 



INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE. 

The first international Masonic con- 
ference having been held in Brussels, the 
capital of Belgium, in June, 1907. the 
second was convened in Washington, D. 
C, October, 1912. After a week spent 
in Boston, Mass., members of the su- 
preme council, 33d degree. Ancient 
Scottish Rite, attended a closing session 
in the Masonic Temple, where the Most 
Puissiant Sovereign Grand Commander 
presided. His real name was Smith. 

It was decided to hold the next gather- 
ing of the members of the supreme coun- 
cil of the northern jurisdiction of the 
United States at Philadelphia. The date 
is September. 1913. A special train of 
Pullman cars carried the Masons to 
Niagara Falls, where they were- met by 
a deputation from the Canadian supreme 
council. Having been escorted to the 
Clifton House for a banquet, and other- 
wise entertained, they resumed the jour- 
ney to Washington. Here the Southern 
supreme council as host entertained them 
in a week of festivities. The main ob- 
ject of the visit, however, appeared to 



-I. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



be to attend the second international 
Masonic conference already mentioned. 



FLEET ELKS. 

Two men who were about 45 and 60 
years of age were instantly killed about 
one o'clock in the morning- of the sec- 
ond Sunday of June, not far from 
Pittsfield. Mass., on the Dalton road, 
and another man who was with them was 
taken to the hospital. The four in the 
automobile that ran down and killed 
the men were arrested. The driver was 
an Elk, who with one of the other men 
had been lately living at the Elk home. 
A newspaper report says that: 

The machine was evidently going at a high 
rate of speed, as the ground was torn up for a 
distance of 100 feet by the axle, from which one 
of the wheels had come off, before striking a 
telegraph pole and breaking it off. This obstruc- 
tion stopped the machine and it partly over- 
turned in the ditch against a wire fence. 
Doucet and Leonard probably never knew 
what struck them. The former had his neck 
and both legs broken, scalp wounds and cuts 
and bruises all over the body. The latter's 
back was broken, there were scalp wounds 
and the body was cut in many places. Thur- 
low, who says his home is in Brookline, is an 
Elk, belonging to the Burlington lodge. He 
is 24 years old. Hulske is 30 years old and 
says he hails from Boston. Both have been 
at the Elks' home for two weeks. A Pitts- 
field Elk said today that the young men were 
liked at the home, were popular and were gen- 
tlemen. They had been at the Elks' home 
and left there shortly after 12, according to 
those who were at the club at the time. They 
went to the Pittsfield garage for some gaso- 
lene and on the way picked up Godette. 
Later they started for Dalton and encoun- 
tered the pedestrians. They were seen about. 
the city early last evening and appeared to 
be having a jolly time. 

Is not the question a natural one, 
whether a lodge or secret society home 
is a good place to start from on a mid- 
night ride? The Elks drink a toast 
regularly at 11 p. m., but do not restrict 
themselves to the toast. The order was 
originally constituted to evade the full 
effect of a prohibitory law, and an ac- 
count of its formation was given on 
page 56 of the June magazine, in the 
article, "Secret Society Zoo." 



I spake openly to the world; I ever 
taught in the synagogue, and in the tem- 
ple, whither the Jews always resort ; and 
in secret have I said nothing. — John 
xviii : 20. 



THE HAND OF JOAB. 

In an editorial on what it names "The 
Vice Trust," a prominent religious jour- 
nal quotes this statement made by Dr. 
Moody Boynton : 

"When it comes to getting the active assist- 
ance of some Federal officials in protecting 
womanhood, cleaning up the vice districts of 
a great city, keeping clear of liquor the Pro- 
hibition states and other sections of our 
nation, you must brace yourself for a dis- 
appointment; for experience teaches that even 
in the high seats of courts, in the quiet 
seclusion of the Attorney General's office, and 
in the department of internal revenue, law is 
often interpreted in such a way as to give 
comfort to the forces of darkness and dis- 
couragement to the powers of light." 

The article itself declares that "The 
Supreme Court of the United States has 
recognized that there are good trusts 
and bad trusts, but the Vice Trust is 
the worst of all." "These combinations, 
by secret methods, set themselves to de- 
feat the good and most effective efforts 
for the advance of the people in morality 
and good citizenship," says this journal, 
thus recognizing the service which se- 
crecy renders in some form to evil pur- 
poses. It indicates a hypocritical method 
of protecting the secrecy which in turn 
protects vice, when it says : 

"A most conspicuous instance of the 
methods of the Vice Trust was the se- 
curing of the exclusion of the report of 
the Chicago Vice Commission from the 
United States mails. This Commission 
was appointed by the mayor of Chicago 
at the request of the clergy of the city, 
and consisted of thirty of the most re- 
spected men and women of the city. The 
commission spent a year in investigation, 
and prepared a report which is the clear- 
est and most convincing presentation of 
the prevalence of vice -ever made of im- 
moral conditions in any city. It was 
widely circulated through the mails and 
otherwise, but proved so damaging that 
those interested in the maintenance of 
vicious resorts brought it to the attention 
of the postoffice authorities, and it was 
decided to exclude it from the mails 
after it had been in circulation six 
months. The report is the finding of a 
municipal body * * * and its ex- 
clusion from the mails aroused great in- 
dignation." 

The method here used is so much like 
those sought and emploved by that arch 
enemy of free speech, Freemasonry, that 



November. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



213 



the hand of Joab is easily suspected of 
being with the Vice Trust in this thing. 
Vice and lodge secrecy steadfastly clasp 
fraternal hands, and together they fear 
Freedom of the Press. Masonry is itself 
one of the Vice Trusts, and it makes no 
secret of restricting freedom of the press 
by laws restraining the press from show- 
ing plainly and conclusively its irreli- 
gious and immoral teachings and prac- 
tices. Masonic bodies and members are 
great patrons and protectors of crimi- 
nality, and it would be truly Masonic to 
shield the Vice Trust with which it is 
linked by close affiliation. To cite a sin- 
gle instance, proof of this fraternal unity 
is furnished by the drinking and de- 
bauchery of the Triennial Templar Con- 
clave, which adds to all the daring crime 
of sacrilege. a Is the hand of Joab with 
thee in this matter?" 



SHOULD CHURCH FELLOWSHIP 
SECRETISTS. 

BY DAXIEL KAUFFMAN, BISHOP, MEN- 

XOXITE CHURCH, AND EDITOR 

GOSPEL HERALD. 

Can the church aftord to fellowship 
members who belong to secret lodges ? 
\\ e oppose the secret lodge on the broad 
ground that it is contrary to Scripture 
and to the highest interests of man. The 
professed child of God who enters into 
covenant relations with this secret, oath- 
bound organization is shockingly un- 
faithful to his covenantal vow before 
God. How can he swear to "always 
hail, and ever conceal, and never reveal 
the sublime truths'' of which he is yet in 
the dark when the oath is positively for- 
bidden by Christ and the apostles i Matt. 
5 : 33S7' Jas. 5:12), and the law spe- 
cifically condemns swearing to things 
unknown (Lev. 5:4, 5)? How can he 
profess to have come out from the world 
and identified himself with "a peculiar 
people" (Tit. 2:14), when at the same 
time he holds "inviolable" in his breast 
things which bind him more closely to 
this unscriptural organization than to his 
family or his church (II Cor. 6:14-18) ? 
How can he confess to have his life "hid 
with Christ in God" and at the same time 
maintain his fellowship with a motley 
crowd of professed believers, half-believ- 
ers and unbelievers in an organization 
which studiously avoids and deliberatelv 



refuses to permit any official reference 
to Jesus Christ as the immaculate Son 
of God? 

These are a few of the many questions 
which indicate how incompatible is lodge 
membership with membership in the 
body of Jesus Christ. Let us therefore 
speak in no uncertain tones when we tes- 
tify against this arch foe of real spiritual 
life which has been for generations rob- 
bing both Church and home. To all 
who are in danger of succumbing to the 
voice of this siren we would say with 
Paul. "Have no fellowship w T ith the un- 
fruitful works of darkness, but rather 
reprove them. For it is a shame even to 
speak of those things which are done of 
them in secret." 

Recognizing that both Bible and the 
highest interests of man are against the 
things for which organized secretism 
stands, the question naturally arises. Can 
the Church afford to fellowship as mem- 
bers those who are also members of se- 
cret orders? Is not the church which 
professes to oppose secret societies and 
at the same time' tolerate lodgemen as 
members, simply inviting the lodge to 
come in and take possession of the or- 
ganization in the next generation? Has 
not this been the history of many a 
denomination which at first vehemently 
opposed secret orders, then for the sake 
of peace and winning more members al- 
lowed members of lodges to remain as 
members of the church, then eased up on 
the question of ministers belonging to 
lodges, then kept silent, and then em- 
braced and defended this subtle foe of 
real Christian faith and life. Where is 
the consistency in railing out in thunder 
tones against an institution of evil and 
then hugging it close to our breast by 
holding in Christian fellowship members 
who have been hypnotized and captured 
by this evil ? Though the ship at sea 
may be encompassed and tossed about 
with mountain billows as it faces the 
mighty storm, it is safe so long as the 
water is kept outside. But when the 
water comes in it is a sign that. unless 
the leakage is stopped and conditions 
changed the billows will soon begin to 
roll in and sink the ship. So with the 
question of the secret lodge or any other 
evil. Let these troublesome waters be 
kept outside and the Church is safe, even 



214 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



though we may have rough sailing at 
times. 

To all churches that have weakened 
and permitted members of secret lodges 
to find membership among them we 
would say with Paul, "Purge out the old 
leaven, that ye may be a new lump." 

May the Lord help us to remain pure 
and loyal, consistent and courageous, 
standing up in defense of the whole Gos- 
pel, praying and working that the Church 
may be kept pure from all evil, acknowl- 
edging the Bible discipline which if put 
into force in the spirit of the Gospel will 
keep the Church free from entangling 
alliances with any institution of iniquity. 
May we do all that we can to persuade 
men to throw off the slavery of sin what- 
ever may be the form of the chains 
forged about them. 



INTERMIXTURE THE SECRET. 

The first grand lodge of the deistical 
order of Freemasonry was organized one 
hundred and seventeen years later than 
the Roman Catholic order of Jesuits 
was authorized by Pope Paul III. ; for 
while Jesuitism existed from the year 
1540, grand lodge speculative masonry 
can show no date earlier than 1717. 
Though it would no doubt be disputed 
that one is the prototype, it can hardly 
fail to be noticed that the other is of al- 
most identical type. In either and in 
both, accordingly, the thoughtful student 
and observer discovers principles and 
practices almost incredible. The surprise 
is more confounding because in both or- 
ders are men of the finest culture and 
of apparent worth. It loses none of its 
perplexing quality when some of the 
products of both systems are seen to 
have been, within certain limits, useful 
or benevolent. One Jesuit tortures a 
Protestant, another is a messenger of 
mercy to a leper. Under his iron oath 
he will unquestionably sacrifice himself 
or any other man. 

Subjects of this kind impose a disad- 
vantage on the humbler class of critics 
or instructors, who, even when they can- 
not be answered with argument or fact, 
can be met with retort and epithet. Far 
otherwise is the case when the truth is 
found in the records of a dignified and 
accredited historian. In the present in- 
stance, both praise and blame appear, in 



connection with the story of James II., 
where Macauley has occasion to intro- 
duce the man who "bore, perhaps, the 
largest part in the ruin of the House of 
Stuart." Place can be made here for no 
more than a few sentences, selected from 
pages in which the great English his- 
torian informs his readers concerning an 
order apparently antagonistic to Free- 
masonry yet strikingly similar. Macau- 
ley here says, in part: 

"As each of the two parties at the 
court of James had the support of for- 
eign princes, so each had also the sup- 
port of an ecclesiastical authority to 
which the king paid great deference. The 
supreme pontiff was for legal and mod- 
erate courses ; and his sentiments were 
expressed by the nuncio and by the vicar 
apostolic. On the other side was a body 
of which the weight balanced even the 
weight of the papacy, the mighty order 
of Jesus. 

"That at this conjuncture these two 
great spiritual powers, once, as it seem- 
ed, inseparably allied, should have been 
opposed to each other, is a most im- 
portant and remarkable circumstance. 
During a period of little less than a thou- 
sand years the regular orders had been 
the chief support of the holy see * * * 
In the sixteenth century the pontificate, 
exposed to new dangers more formid- 
able than had ever before threatened it, 
was saved by a new religious order 
which was animated by intense enthusi- 
asm and organized with exquisite skill. 
When the Jesuits came to the rescue of 
the papacy, they found it in extreme 
peril ; but from that moment the tide of 
battle turned. Protestantism, which had, 
during a whole generation, carried all 
before it, was stopped in its progress, 
and rapidly beaten back from the foot 
of the Alps to the shores of the Baltic. 
* * * They appear to have discover- 
ed the precise point to which intellectual 
culture can be carried without risk of 
intellectual emancipation * * * with 
still greater assiduity and still greater 
success they applied themselves to the 
ministry of the confessional. Through- 
out Catholic Europe the secrets of every 
government and of almost every family 
of note were in their keeping * * * 
But with the admirable energy, disinter- 
estedness, and self-devotion, which were 



November, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



characteristic of the society, great vices 
were mingled. It was alleged, and not 
without foundation, that the ardent spirit 
which made the Jesuit regardless of his 
ease, of his liberty, and of his life, made 
him also regardless of truth and of mer- 
cy ; that no means which could promote 
the interests of his religion seemed to 
him unlawful, and that by the interest of 
his religion he too often meant the in- 
terest of his society. It was alleged that 
in the most atrocious plots recorded in 
history, his agency could be distinctly 
traced ; that, constant only in attach- 
ment to the fraternity to which he be- 
longed, he was in. some countries the 
most dangerous enemy of freedom, and 
in others the most dangerous enemy of 
order. The mighty victories which he 
boasted that he had achieved in the cause 
of the church were, in the judgment of 
many illustrious members of that church, 
rather apparent than real. He had in- 
deed labored with a wonderful show of 
success to reduce the world under her 
laws ; but he had done so by relaxing her 
laws to suit the temper of the world. In- 
stead of toiling to elevate human nature 
to the noble standard fixed by the di- 
vine precept and example, he had low- 
ered the standard till it was beneath the 
average level of human nature * * * 
If he had to deal with a mind truly de- 
vout, he spoke in the saintly tones of the 
primitive fathers ; but with that very 
large part of mankind who have religion 
enough to make them uneasy when they 
do wrong, and not religion enough to 
keep them from doing wrong, he follow- 
ed a very different system. Since he 
could not reclaim them from guilt, it 
was his business to save them from re- 
morse. He had at his command an im- 
mense dispensary of anodynes for a 
wounded conscience * * * 

"So strangely were good and evil in- 
termixed in the character of these cele- 
' brated brethren ; and the intermixture 
was the secret of their gigantic power 
* * * The chief representative of 
Jesuits at Whitehall was an English 
brother of the order who had during 
some time acted as vice provincial, who 
had been long regarded by James with 
peculiar favor, and who had lately been 
made clerk of the closet. This man, 
named Edward Petre. was descended 



from an honorable family. His man- 
ners were courtly; his speech was flow- 
ing and plausible; but he was weak and 
vain, covetous and ambitious. Of all 
the evil counsellors who had access to 
the royal ear, he bore, perhaps, the larg- 
est part in the ruin of the House of Stu- 
art/' 



THE MODEL CHURCH. 

The Watchman of September 8, 191 1, 
declared that the model church "would 
be a church whose chief characteristic is 
love. * * * The impression which 
the model church will make on the world 
will be an impression of love. * * * 
* * * A quarrel among Christians is 
the worst possible heresy. It is so be- 
cause a quarrel violates the most funda- 
mental and necessary feature of the re- 
ligion of Jesus Christ — love. We re- 
peat what we have said before at greater 
length, that, if the Christian church had 
continued to show the same active love 
and charity as in the first three centuries, 
there never would have been any place 
in the world for fraternal or philan- 
thropic institutions of any kind outside 
of the church. * * * By its warm 
human love it would have held to itself 
the masses of mankind which to-day are 
identified with various sorts of societies 
and orders." 

An article on "Rural Social Better- 
ment," in the same paper, reports that 
"the interdenominational commission of 
Maine is making an effort to induce the 
schools, the Granges, and the churches 
to work in co-operation for" the social 
betterment of the rural districts of the 
State. * * * The ideas of the com- 
mission are shown in the following ex- 
tract from a circular letter : 

The three agencies now active in social 
betterment are the school, the Grange, 
and the church. Often these agencies are 
working entirely apart, sometimes in com- 
petition and rivalry. They should recog- 
nize their community of interests, and 
should co-operate. Sometimes the school 
is of an inferior grade; the Grange and 
the church should combine to improve the 
school. Sometimes there is no Grange, or 
perhaps an inefficient one; the church and 
the school should be allies to establish and 
perfect the Grange. Sometimes there is no 
church; or religious services, if maintained, 
are spiritless and of little value; then the 
school and the Grange should revive and 
sustain the spirit of devotion, and should 



216 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



aid the church to exercise its ethical and 
religious ministrations." 

We are reminded of Artemus Ward's 
description of his home town, from 
which he sallied forth to exhibit his 
"wax riggers," with other features of the 
famous show. ''The principal institu- 
tions," said he, "are the meetin' house 
and hay skales." We venture the sus- 
picion that the writer of the circular let- 
ter never had much experience as pastor 
in a small hamlet where the Grange was 
relatively a leading institution. Maine 
is fortunate if the Roman church has not 
yet succeeded in extirpating from her 
schools the Bible, religious and moral 
teaching scripturally derived and war- 
ranted, and such an activity of influence 
as could be thought of among agencies 
to "revive and sustain the spirit of de- 
votion." Maine is fortunate, indeed, if 
she finds her Grange willing to turn from 
cards, dances, and things in natural har- 
mony with them, and able to help the 
"church exercise its ethical and religious 
ministrations." We wonder if this circu- 
lar was not written by the rather youth- 
ful pastor of a city church. 

Dr. Blanchard touches this very sub- 
ject of church duty and comparison of 
churches with lodges in Chapter VI of 
"Modern Secret Societies." 

"In the question there are two impli- 
cations : first, the churches do not do 
their duty; second, lodges are needed in 
view of this lack. * * * Churches 
do not do their whole duty; they are 
made up of imperfect men and women. 
* * * This is not only charged by 
lodge men, but admitted with sorrow 
and shame by the church herself. Daily 
she strives to be more nearly what her 
Divine Head and Master would have 
her be. But it does not follow that there 
is need of lodges on this account. 
.All honest work may be done openly ; 
'Out of the darkness, dark deeds grow/ 
It is probable, however, that, when this 
question is asked, the real point in the 
mind of the questioner is this: 'If the 
church would give more money to those 
who need it, would not that hinder the 
growth of secret societies ?' There is 
no doubt of it ; but then the question 
arises, Ts it the duty of the church to 
give money to these men who join lodges 
to get help? * * * What would the 



church be if she should distribute money 
to idle, extravagant, or vicious men? 

* * * At the same time, it is the duty 
of the church to distribute alms where 
it can be wisely and helpfully done 

* * * and for two thousand years 
the church has been doing this * * * 
She has established moral standards and 
created a moral atmosphere which have 
originated the charities of the world. 

"When a city is devastated by fire or 
flood, what communities respond to the 
cry for help? Christian communities. 
When millions of people are starving un- 
der a cloudy or a burning sky, what na- 
tions send ships laden with relief? Chris- 
tian nations. 

"How would such lessons be learned 
from orders which exclude the needy, 
make all that enter pay, and limit benev- 
olence to those who have paid? It is 
the height of impertinence for members 
of secret societies to criticise the Bride 
of Christ ; imperfect she undoubtedly is, 
but she has no lessons to learn from 
lodgism. Imperfect she is, but she is 
still the light of the world and the salt 
of the earth. * * * The chief work 
of the church will always be to get the 
souls of men into living contact with the 
Savior of men ; when this is done all 
else will follow." 

We get an impression of confusion 
from the favorable discussion of a case 
depending on comparing lodges and 
churches. There seems to be a lack of 
homogeneousness, a deficiency of simi- 
larity, that confounds comparison. It 
suggests, in rhetoric, the laughable mixed 
figure of which we sometimes have glar- 
ing illustrations ; as in the exhortation 
of the professor to his class : "Gentle- 
men, if you have one spark of genius, 
water it ;" or when we are shown a pro- 
gressive political car "rolling onward, 
and gnashing its teeth as it rolls." Even 
Ossian, abounding with "beautiful and 
correct metaphors," is criticised for one 
mixed figure : "Trothal went forth with 
the stream of his people, but they met a 
rock : for Fingal stood unmoved ; broken 
they rolled back from his side. Nor did 
they roll in safety ; the spear of the king 
pursued their flight." This is a mixture 
of figurative language with plain ; com- 
parison breaks. Shakespeare mixes two 



November, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



217 



figures when he makes it possible "to 
take arms against a sea of troubles." A 
literal spear pursuing figurative rolling 
waves, and figurative arms defending 
one against a figurative sea, make havoc 
of comparison. 

Such figures are suggested by the at- 
tempt to mix ideas of things so incon- 
gruous as churches and lodges. To ask 
which one prefers, a church or a lodge, 
is too much like asking which you would 
rather have, four-sixteenths or five- 
thirteenths of a dollar, when one of the 
conditions of the solution is to avoid 
reducing the fractions to other terms. 
The comparative factors of the church 
and lodge problem seem incapable of re- 
duction to a common denominator. 

The Church's one foundation 

Is Jesus Christ her Lord. 



lews of §nx if orH 

MICHIGAN CONVENTION. 

The Michigan State Convention will 
be held November 6th and 7th in the 
14th Street Christian Reformed Church, 
Holland. 

The first session begins at 2 :oo o'clock 
Wednesday, the 6th. We regret not be- 
ing able to give more space to their very 
strong program, but it was received too 
late. 



"Masonic Temples," which appears in 
this number, has been published by the 
Association in a 32-page booklet with 
cover and will be sent postpaid for 6 
cents per copy ; per hundred $3.40. It is 
worthy of being put into every home in 
your neighborhood. That is our judg- 
ment, what is yours? Will you do it? 



We wonder if parents will recognize 
their opportunity for interesting their 
children in this reform through the story 
"Marlboro" by Miss Susan F. Hinman, 
which began in the Cynosure for 
October ! 



One of the newer fraternal insurance 
lodges is the Fraternal Reserve Associa- 
tion, with headquarters at Oshkosh. Wis. 



past few weeks at Mattoon, 111. ; Mound 
Ridge and Halstead and Newton, Kan. ; 
Waterloo, la. ; Indianapolis, Ind., and is 
to speak at the Michigan convention on 
Nov. 6th. 

Wheaton College is prospering in 
numbers as well as quality of its stu- 
dents this Fall. Why could not many 
of our readers visit a college that does 
not have to weaken or destroy faith in 
the Word of God, or keep silent on the 
secret society iniquity? If you should 
make your call on November 7th, De- 
cember 1 2th or January 23d you could 
have the added pleasure and profit of en- 
joying the special lecture course. We 
have often called upon President Blanch- 
ard for help, and now let us show our 
appreciation by a visit to the college 
which is so dear to him and has been 
such a godsend to our country. 



CHRISTIAN CONFERENCE IN 
LOUISIANA. 

There will be a three days' undenom- 
inational Christian Conference held at 
Union Baptist Church, Rev. G. W. Da- 
vis pastor, Alexandria, La. Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday, November 20, 21 
and 22, 1912. The purpose of the Con- 
ference is a prayerful study of the Bible, 
and to discuss subjects of great moment 
to the Negro race and the Christian 
church, to see what plans can be put on 
foot to awaken a greater interest in the 
masses to pay more attention to religious 
services and thereby win the young 
from the places of sin. 

Mrs. Lizzie Roberson of Dyersburg, 
Tenn., will enliven the Conference with 
Bible lessons and spicy lectures. Mrs. 
Roberson is one of the ablest female 
Bible students and one of the best lec- 
turers on Christian reformation in the 
South. F. T. Davidsox. 



President Blanchard has spoken on 
secret societies by invitation during the 



CAMPAIGNING OF SECRETARY 
STODDARD. 

Martinsburg. Pa., Oct. 12th. 1912. 
Dear Cynosure : 

God's goodness has been extended an- 
other month. Your Eastern representa- 
tive has been able to put forth the usual 
effort with favorable results. My meet- 
ings in Christian Reformed churches in 
Passaic and Paterson, N. J., were well 
attended and encouraging in many ways. 
Our good friend Peter Stam gave spe- 



218 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



cial help as he has frequently done be- 
fore. There have been several changes 
in the working- forces in the anti-secre- 
cy churches at Paterson during the year, 
owing to deaths and removals. None of 
our friends, however, appeared discour- 
aged. A goodly number of new work- 
ers were found. 

Attendance at a Conference of Mis- 
souri Synod Lutheran pastors, meeting 
at Bloomfield, N. J., was very helpful. It 
was voted to give your representative a 
hearing. Questions were asked regard- 
ing some of the minor lodges, showing 
the perplexing situation in which some 
pastors find themselves. Frequently the 
lodges with but little ritual, claim they 
are not secret societies. The pastor finds 
that the lodge in initiating some many ob- 
jectionable features have been omitted. 
What shall he do? How far shall he ex- 
ercise discipline? These and many like 
perplexing questions arise. The cunning 
and deceit of lodges and lodge organizers 
make it difficult for the pastor often to 
know the real situation. When persons 
have gained admittance to the church 
claiming that the organization with 
which they are connected is not a lodge, 
they later sometimes will admit that it is. 
The pastors at this conference seemed 
glad of such suggestion and help as your 
representative was able to give. The an- 
tilodge battle is a real battle with a cun- 
ning deceptive foe. 

After a night on the ocean I found 
myself in the "Hub City.'' Many in Bos- 
ton as elsewhere have lost through the 
so-called insurance lodges. My arrival 
was on the nineteenth of September, the 
birthday of the New England represen- 
tative. A parlor-meeting in the eve- 
ning, preceded by an afternoon of con- 
gratulations and good wishes, ended a 
happy occasion. Mrs. Stoddard intro- 
duced a number of speakers who hap- 
pily referred to her work. President 
McNaugher gave the antisecrecy mes- 
sage. Brother McNaugher after a pas- 
torate of nineteen years has resigned. 
He indicated his intention to give more 
attention to the needed reforms. While 
in Boston the usual list of Cynosure 
subscriptions were secured. In response 
to invitation part was taken in meetings 
in the Covenanter and First United 
Presbyterian churches. The N. E. rep- 



resentative reported the circulation of 
much antisecrecy literature. The work- 
ers are praying that God may send forth 
helpers to take the place of those called 
to their eternal reward. 

As it seemed best for my trip to the 
West to wait until November, I have 
been looking- up our interests in West- 
ern Pennsylvania since the first of this 
month. Uniontown, Masontown and 
Scottdale were visited prior to my at- 
tendance at the Pittsburg Conference of 
the Free Methodist church. This con- 
ference, meeting in the large new church 
at Belle Vernon, is a gathering long to 
be remembered. The pastors' reports 
gave evidence of the advocacy of an un- 
popular cause, but there was the ring 
of victory all the way through, and much 
rejoicing. The spiritual atmosphere was 
fine, and while unprepared, I was not as- 
tonished at the large sums of money 
pledged and contributed to various 
church interests. Your representative 
was given a seat in the conference and 
an opportunity to speak of N. C. A. 
work. Several new names were added 
to the Cynosure subscription list. On 
the seventh I took part in the special 
meeting of the Providence Mission, 
Pittsburgh. On the ninth and tenth I 
spoke to meetings composed in each in- 
stance of about 'twenty women and 
children, the pastors with the writer 
being the only men present. The 
first of these meetings was in the 
M. E. church, Alverton, Pa., the 
second in the Mennonite Mission, 
Altoona, Pa. What part the lodge has 
in keeping men from the night meetings 
of the churches I can only guess, but 
judging from the interest in religious 
services in some of the churches here, 
I may guess there will be many more 
women in heaven than men. A lady 
at the Mission spoke of being connected 
with the sisterhood, of a brotherhood 
that she said was not a lodge, but in less 
than two minutes she said of the same 
thing, "Our Lodge reads the Bible and 
prays just as they do in the church." 

How much easier it would be to deal 
with this question if people would be 
consistent, but they won't, so we must 
meet conditions as we find them. 

I am now at the home of Preacher 
Abram Metzler of the Mennonite 



November, 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



219 



Church. Arrangements have been made 
for meetings in churches, near at hand, 
for the 13th. Other doors are open- 
ing for work during the week. Let us 
work on until Jesus comes, or calls us 
hence. Our hearts are constantly sad- 
dened by the departure of reform lead- 
ers, but God depends on no man for vic- 
tory. 

Conditions in the moral, social and po- 
litical world would indicate great changes 
near at hand. Christ is to come again 
soon. Let us be up and doing while the 
opportunity is here. 

Yours in the conflict, 

W. B. Stoddard. 



REVIVAL AND CHRISTIAN CONFER- 
ENCE. 

Alexandria, La., Oct. 9th, 1912. 

Dear Cynosure: 

Praise God from whom all blessings 
floweth. Rev. Dr. W. T. Nickerson of 
Chattanooga, Tenn., rendered me inval- 
uable service for three weeks in a most 
glorious revival at Shiloh Baptist Church 
here. He did not fail to speak out boldly 
and earnestly against secret societies, 
and all kindred evils. His was a strong 
testimony against the unfruitful works 
of darkness. He at one time was a high 
degree Mason as well as a member 
of several minor lodges, but God has 
graciously delivered him from all, and 
now he is God's own free servant, de- 
claring His whole counsel to a crooked 
and perverse generation. Quite a num- 
ber were offended because of the truth, 
but many others bore testimony and gave 
unstinted support to the meeting. Twen- 
ty-two were added to the church at one 
special service. 

Among other things after reciting 
some of his own personal experiences as 
a lodge man, Rev. Dr. Nickerson de- 
clared, "No man can be a true worship- 
per of God and a worshipper of the se- 
cret society God, for the two are at 
variance. The one is against the other." 
He gave many scriptural proofs and re- 
cited many instances of his personal ex- 
periences in the lodge to prove his con- 
tention. 

I have visited several rural points and 
borne testimony against the unfruitful 
works of darkness since my last letter. 
But the greater part of my time has been 



spent in house to house missionary work 
here. 

Already the secret empire is at work 
canvassing against the undenominational 
conference to be held here next month 
and advising its disciples not to attend. 

I am in receipt of several invitations 
to attend meetings in New Orleans. 
Crowley, Rayne, Lake Charles, Jennings, 
Fullerton, Stables, Leesville and Boyce. 
I am hopeful of meeting each appoint- 
ment. I ask the prayers of the faithful, 
the elect of God. May He pour His 
Holy Spirit upon us and give us a blessed 
Pentecostal conference next month. 

I am looking forward with great en- 
thusiasm to the anticipated visit of Mrs. 
Lizzie Woods Roberson. I am expect- 
ing great things from God ; therefore, I 
shall by His grace attempt great things 
for Him. 

The eyes of many are being opened 
here to see the evil of the secret lodge 
system as they have never before, and 
many are thinking very seriously of sev- 
ering their connections with lodges. Let 
the light of God's Word shine forth un- 
to a glorious day. Yours sincerely, 
Francis J. Davidson. 



A SECEDER AND EVANGELIST. 

Dyersburg, Tenn., July 12, 1912. 

I was invited to conduct a Holiness 
meeting in Brinkley, Ark. On my ar- 
rival we entered upon the work of the 
Lord, with the power of the Holy Ghost 
guiding and directing and pointing out 
arguments toward the current sins of the 
day. In this bombardment of five weeks' 
duration, several shots were" fired into 
the camp of the secret order fraternities, 
because of their baneful influence upon 
many silly, ignorant men and women 
throughout the length and breadth of the 
land. I challenged them on the ground 
of their pretension, that they are of sa- 
cred origin. I challenged them on the 
ground of their wicked practices, high- 
handed tyranny against Christ and his 
Church, and their wholesale slaughter oi 
the morals of the people, and the conse- 
quent general degradation of the com- 
munities in which they hold despotic 
sway. 

During the last week of our meeting I 
noticed a light in a Knight of Pythias 
lodge hall, just opposite the church, 



220 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November. 1912. 



where it was reported drunkards, liars, 
haters of the truth, members of 
churches, and ever}' grade of men had 
met to plan my destruction. This wicked 
crowd culminated in a mob of 40 or 50 
men., who came out against me with 
guns, revolvers, whips, and knives, to 
kill me for preaching the truth. So one 
can see for how much truth and right- 
eousness they stand. 

I have myself been identified with sev- 
eral lodges, but my soul seemed to pro- 
test against this fellowship. There are 
a few good men in these wretched insti- 
tioris but they need to be pitied for their 
ignorance. I believe there are a great 
many, who would sever their relation 
with the lodge rather than forfeit their 
eternal reward; who for a coffin after 
death and a few dollars of funeral ex- 
penses, would consider it a poor ex- 
change for a damned soul. For no man 
can live up to lodge requisites and make 
good for the Kingdom of God. Jesus 
Christ said in John 10:1 : "Verily, verily, 
I say unto you. he that entereth not by 
the door into the fold of the sheep, but 
climbeth up some other way, the same 
is a thief and a robber." In the 9th verse 
he said: "I am the door; by me if any 
men enter in, he shall be saved," which 
infers that if he enter not in by Him he 
cannot be saved." 

We know very well to make any lodge 
universally accepted the name of Jesus 
Christ must be left out of its ritual. The 
Jews and Mohammedans reject Jesus 
Christ and also many others. Therefore, 
to make the order acceptable with this 
class of men the name of our Lord Jesus 
Christ must be left out, which is their 
right. Those who unite in this fellow- 
ship are equal. But we who are Christ's 
are admonished in 2 Cor. 6:14: "Be ye 
not unequally yoked together with un- 
belivers : for what fellowship hath right- 
eousness with unrighteousness? And 
what communion hath light with dark- 
ness ?" Xone whatever ! 

I joined the Masons when I was 21 
years old. which was quite a number of 
years ago. I joined the Knights of 
Pythias eight years ago. I joined the 
Knights of Tabor and U. B. F. but none 
of them have ever saved a soul from hell 
or ever held a prayer meeting that I 
know of. When I received the bap- 



tism of the Holy Spirit I lost all inter- 
est in them. 

M. N. Langston. 

Fort Smith, Ark. 



"LIZZIE WOOD'S LETTER." 

Xewbern, Tenn., Oct. 9, 1912. 
Mr. Win. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Brother in Christ : I have been 
here two weeks. I lectured last Sunday 
night on the sin of secret societies. I 
said the God of Heaven and Earth made 
you, and then you let the Worshipful 
Master make you over again and impose 
laws upon you contrary to the civil laws 
of this country. You keep the laws of 
the lodge but you will not keep God's 
law. You transgress the Law of God by 
obeying man rather than God. You bind 
yourselves together with an oath to keep 
all the laws of your lodge, but you break 
the civil laws. You swear in the first 
degree of Masonry to have your throat 
cut from ear to ear and your tongue torn 
out by the roots ; in the second degree 
you swear to have your left breast 
opened and your heart taken out and 
buried in the rough hands of the sea. In 
the third degree you swear to have your 
body severed in twain and bowels taken 
out and burned into ashes, if you do not 
uphold your brother in everything — 
murder and treason excepted. When I 
had finished these three degrees the 
brothers dismissed themselves so as to 
get out and talk the matter over. One 
old man said I have been an Odd Fel- 
low, and that woman said the oath will 
compel us to murder men. A brother 
Mason stepped up to him and said, "It 
is not so." The old man said, "Yes it is 
so. I used to belong to the Odd Fel- 
low lodge at Bowmanville, Tenn., and I 
know that they killed a man in that 
lodge. They had his grave dug before 
they killed "him, and I quit them for fear 
they might want me to be in the killing, 
and I have never had anything more to 
do with the Odd Fellows. You Masons 
are worse about killing men than the 
Odd Fellows." Then the Mason said, to 
an old man. "Well where do you reckon 
she got our secret?" The old man said, 
"Did you read that tract? That will tell 
you where she got it from." Then the 
Mason said, "Do you know, I can sit 
right in my house and have her put out 



November. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



221 



of the way?" The old man replied,, "Ye-, 
that is just what she said just a minute 
ago. She said Masonry made men mur- 
derers, and you are a deacon of the 
church and yet you are talking about sit- 
ting in your house and having some one 
to kill that woman for telling you the 
truth." When he said that to him, he 
did not say another word about killing 
me, but said we have a law in Tennessee 
to protect us. The old man told him 
that he had no law to keep that woman 
from preaching against his sin. You 
want to kill men whenever you feel like 
it. and then don't want to be reproved, 
but God has said : "Be sure your sin will 
find you out." I was quite amused when 
the old man told me of the conversation 
between them. I learned something 
from him about the Odd Fellows also. 

Dyersburg. Tenn.. Oct. 10. 1912. 
On the night of the same day that I 
wrote you from Newbern the Masonic 
lodge met and discussed me and what I 
had said in my lecture. One of the big 
Masons came early next morning, before 
I had gotten up. and said to the lady of 
the house : "Where is that woman that 
is talking about our lodge and exposing 
our secrets?" The lady says: "Who are 
you talking about. Sister Roberson?" 
He said. "Yes. She is the one. She 
ought to have her neck broken." "Why, 
my dear brother, you are a deacon of the 
church? Would you do a crime like that"' 
He said. "Yes." Then he took it back and 
said. "No, I would not hurt her because 
she is a woman, but we are going to ?et 
the man that told our secrets to her. We 
were up till one o'clock last night at the 
hall. We sent her letter to the headquar- 
ters of our organization and we are go- 
ing to get that man." "What can you 
do about it?'" He said. "That woman 
don't know anything about our lodge." 
"Then why did you sav she ought to 
have her neck broke?" He said. "I was 
joking about that. She cannot be made 
a Ma-on in the Masonic lodge." I could 
not keep from laughing when the ladv 
told me that. I said. "No, they could not 
make me. God made me and did not 
charge me a cent. Women, perhaps have 
not as much sense as men .and vet I 
don't know of any woman that is simple 
enough to let some bootlegging "Wor- 
shipful" divest her of her clothe- and 



blind her. and put a rope around her 
neck, and make her bow on her naked 
left knee and swear to have her throat 
cut from ear to ear. I may be simple, 
but I have better sense than to permit 
that." 

I said to the lad}- where I was stop- 
ping: "Now you see what Masonry is. 
It will make good men murderers. Poor 
man. he wants to behead me for telling 
the people the truth about lodge re- 
ligion." 

I said to the congregation that night : 
"Now all that are living up to God's 
standard oi religion, namely, visiting the 
fatherless and the widows in their afflic- 
tion, hold up your hands." Xot a hand 
went up. I said : "All that are sworn 
to take care oi the sick — those that be- 
long to some secret order and hope to 
have it take care of the sick and bury 
the dead, hold up your hands." Nearly 
all hands went up — gamblers, liars. 
Methodists. Baptists and members of all 
kinds of denominations held up their 
hands. "Now," I said. "Is that pure re- 
ligion? Was God talking to sinners 
when he told what pure religion is. or 
was he talking to us that claim a part in 
Christ? Are we "unspotted from the 
world.' or are we mixed up with all kinds 
of wicked men and swearing to have our 
throats cut from ear to ear ?" 

The next day there was a stir about 
what I had said. The lodge had to meet 
and talk it over. Brother Phillips. I may 
get killed some day. but I expect to go 
right on telling men how wicked these 
lodges are. I know that God has some 
children in this secret trap, and I am go- 
ing to try. with the help of God. to show 
them the trap and how they can get out. 

I know a good man}- who give up the 
lodge after hearing a lecture and reading 
a tract. 

Pray that I may endure hardness as a 
soldier of Jesus Christ. 

Lizzie Robersox. 



For it is a shame even to speak of 
those things which are done of them in 
secret. — Ephesians v: 7. 11. 12. 



Wherefore come out from among 
them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, 
and touch not the unclean thing. — II Cor. 
vi : 14. 15. 17 



222 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



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The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
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Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
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November. 1912. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



223 



HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of 
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FREEMASONRY EXPOSED 

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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1912. 



THE MASTER'S CARPET. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
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WAS WASHINGTON A MASON? 

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HISTORY OF THE ABDUCTION AND MUR- 
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GRAND LODGE VS. JUDGE WHITNEY. 

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HON. THURLOW WEED ON THE MORGAN 

ABDUCTION. 

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VALANCE'S CONFESSION OF THE MUR- 
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This confession of Henry L>. Valance, one 
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OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGREES 
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THE MYSTIC TIE; 

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MASONIC OATHS NULL AND VOID. 

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OATHS AND PENALTIES OF FREE- 
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THE IMAGE OF THE BEAST 

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THE MYSTIC TIE OF FREEMASONRY A 
LEAGUE WITH THE DEVIL 

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Tke Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
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Say not, the struggle naught availeth, 
The labor and the wounds are vain, 

The enemy faints not, nor faileth, 
And as things have been they remain. 

If hopes were dupes, fears may be liars ; 

It may be, in yon smoke concealed, 
Your comrades chase e'en now the 
fliers, 

And, but for you, possess the field. 

For while the tired waves, vainly break- 
ing, 
Seem here no painful inch to gain, 
Far back, through creeks and inlets 
making, 
Comes silent, flooding in, the main. 

And not by eastern windows only, 
When daylight comes, comes in the 
light; 
In front, the sun climbs slow, how 
slowly ! 
But westward, look, the land is 
bright ! 

— Arthur Hugh Clough. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor. 
850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
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piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing- 
Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 

at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 

March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



Marlboro, by Miss S. F. H in man 225 

A Judge On the Lodge, Judge Gibbons of 

Chicago . 229 

Slain in Lodge Initiation 229 

Striving — A Poem. By Grace ? Gold 229 

The Church and the Lodge. By Rev. J. M. 

Foster, D. D 229 

We Shall Know — a Poem. By Royal 

Tucker Morgan 233 

Departure from the Faith. By Rev. A. J. 

Millard . 233 

How to Weigh a Sin. By Mrs. Julia A. 

Shelhamer 233 

Prayer in Reform Work. By Rev. G. A. 

Pegram 234 

From Our Exchanges— 

Their Object— The Roman Catholics 236 

Another Lodge Tragedy 236 

Unbearable Driving. From the Sunday 

School Times 236 

c 'The Condemnation of Secret Societies." 

By Rev. L. V. Harrell— Advertisement. 237 
Binding School Children by Oath. Edi- 
torial in "Chicago Daily News" 237 

Six Hundred Chinese Masons 237 

Where Do the Baptists Stand? By Rev. 

P. A. Klein in The Pacific Baptist. .. .238 
Notice of "Departure to Various Grand 
Lodges Above." in "The Clean Com- 
monwealth" 238 



Freemasons' Faith. By Albert Pike in 
"The Texas Freemason" 238 

Thomas Smith Webb, Author of "Webb's 
Masonic Monitor" 239 

The Houn' Dog— A Secret Order. .... .239 

What Is the Matter with Methodism?. .239 

World-Wide Tour— One Hundred Years 
of Mormanism 240 

The Elks. Editorial in "Lutheran Her- 
ald" 240 

A Voice from Africa. From "Africa's 
Golden Harvests" 241 

Another Side of the Picture. From 
"The Gospel Messenger" . . . . : 2|2 

Editorial— 

The Dangerous Cult 242 

Going to Egynt for Help 243 

Masonic Reservations 243 

A Censer of Strange Fire. 245 

Wisdom Wins a Victory 245 

Married to the Sword 246 

Grand Lodge Interference 246 

"The Religion of Oddfellowship"'. 247 

Spring Day at Cornell 247 

News of Our Work- 
President Blanchard, J. P. Graybell, 

Rev. G. A. Pegram and Rev. P. A. 

Klein 248 

Michigan -State Convention 249 

Secretary Stoddard's Report 249 

Once a Mason— Amos Wright 251 

Agent Davidson's Report 251 

"Lizzie Wood's Letter" 252 

Kind Words 253 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACT* 

These consist of 22 different tracts, envelope 
size, comprising in all 179 pages of reading 
matter, and entitled as follows : Why I Left the 
Rebekah Lodge. Why I Left the Masons. Ex- 
perience of Stephen Merritt, the Evangelist. 
Graciously Delivered from Seven Secret Societies. 
The Church and the Lodge. Baptist Testimonies. 
Lodge Religion. Are Insurance Lodges Christian? 
The Strange Case of Mr. Goodman. The "Good Man" 
Argument. Masonic Obligations. Catechism of 
Oddfellowship. Oddfellowship a Religious Institu- 
tion. Why Do Men Remain Oddfellows? The Wor- 
ship of Secret Societies Offered to Satan. Sketch of 
National Christian Association. Two Nights in a 
Lodge Room. The Secret Foe of the Sabbath. How 
to Save Christians from Lodges. Lodge Burial 
Services. Ought Christians to Hold Membership 
in Modern Woodmen of America? Ethics of Mar- 
riage and Home Life. Each, 2 cents; an assort- 
ment, 25 cents. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to the world; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLV. 



:HICAGO, DECEMBER, 1912. 



NUMBER 8. 



1 


HXarllr0r0 


i 



CHAPTER III. 



Bayard Meets Mr. Worldly Wiseman and 
Ruth Encounters Giant Despair. 



(SYNOPSIS.— Celia Bond, Ruth Markham, 
Bayard Kent and Lyman Russell are intro- 
duced on their way to enter Marlboro College. 
As they journey, they give their reasons for 
desiring a college education. When they reach 
Marlboro, Ruth discovers that she has lost 
her purse containing one hundred dollars. 
After sending a telegram of inquiry, the young 
men accompany the girls to their boarding 
place, Bayard offering Ruth pecuniary assist- 
ance's well as sympathy. Later, on the way 
to Lyman's room, the two young men discuss 
the outlook for self-supporting students in 
Marlboro.) 

When Bayard left his friend of a day 
he was minded to give himself the treat 
that Lyman had refused. It was not 
cold, but the rain made it seem so. The 
trifling lunch eaten on the train was a 
poor substitute for Bayard's usual even- 
ing dinner. A a cup of hot, cream- 
mantled chocolate imaged itself to his 
senses as the most desirable thing in life. 

Five minutes' walk brought him to the 
corner drug store. A half dozen students 
were lined up at the counter before the 
soda fountain or seated at small round 
tables in the rear, partaking of various 
"dopes" and "sundaes." 

Before Bayard could give his order, 
he was accosted by a voice at his elbow, 
"Is this Kent, of '13?" 

Social readiness was one of Bayard's 



many gifts, and he responded with more 
of gratification than surprise, though the 
speaker was a stranger. 

He was taller and more imposing 
physically than Bayard, singularly hand- 
some, too, with a face that suggested 
the Apollo Belvedere. Without the ex- 
aggerations of style affected by many 
college men, he gave the impression of 
being exceptionally well dressed. His 
well cut lips had a somewhat haughty 
curve, but nothing could have been more 
sincerely gracious than his manner in 
addressing Bayard. 

"I'm Hanson, of '12. I've been told to 
be on the lookout for you. I'm certainly 
glad to have found you so soon. Are 
you located for the term?" 

"Not definitely," responded Bayard 
with the openness which was one of his 
charms. "I am on my way to my cousin, 
Doctor Kent's for tonight, but beyond 
that I have no plans." 

"I have a suggestion, if you can give 
me a few minutes after you leave here. 
I think you might find it of advantage. 
Do you know Williams, of '12?. He's, 
of your town." 

"'Bud' Williams? I should say I do. 
Raised with him. He's a mighty fine 
chap." 

"He says the same of you," returned 
Hanson. "It's through him that I knew 
of you. Saw your picture in a class grout) 



226 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1912. 



in his room, you know. He hoped to 
see you when you arrived. When did 
you come — seven-thirty ? We were both 
down there, but we missed you some 
how." 

Bayard had seen little of Williams 
during the last year or two, and was 
both surprised and flattered at the latter's 
interest in him. He explained, however, 
that he had been with friends and that 
they had all been detained. 

"There's no finding anybody in that 
mob, any how. It's doubtless better as it 
is. What are you taking? — hot choco- 
late? — I'll take one, too. 'Gratful and 
comforting' on a night like this." 

Imitation is the sincerest form of flat- 
tery, and flattery is the most subtle form 
of patronage. It was not till later in the 
interview that Bayard's usually quick 
perceptions rallied from the benumbing 
opiate of upper-class attentions to recog- 
nize that he had been patronized. 

"Everybody's lonesome," and nobody 
more so than the newly arrived fresh- 
man, not yet adjusted to a strange envi- 
ronment. Hanson knew this well, and 
played skillfully on the supposed forlorn- 
ness of his companion. It is true that 
Bayard had only a few blocks to walk 
in order to find a hospitable greeting 
from kindred young and old, but he was 
not eager to abridge the interval of soli- 
tude and freedom. He wanted some 
leisure to think. His conversation with 
Lyman Russell had started a train of 
questions in his mind. He could even 
have spared the sophomore's friendly ad- 
vances ; but Bayard was in the habit of 
accepting heartily the most unexpected 
situations and seeking to learn from the 
most unpromising individuals. Hanson 
was far from unpromising. Bayard 
knew how to listen better than most per- 
sons of his age, and his courteous defer- 
ence betrayed the sophomore into some 
hasty revelations. He was presently 
acquainting Bayard with his inmost de- 
sires and ambitions. 

"You see, Kent, Marlboro was not 
my choice of a college at all. It hasn't, 
of course, the standing of the Eastern 
universities — can't have ; it's a parvenu." 

Bayard felt like protesting against ap- 
plying that term to an institution that 
had attained the age of seventy-six 
years ; but the sophomore had now 
launched upon the tide of confidential 



discourse and was not to be halted. 

4 T dare say," he admitted, "that a 
Marlboro diploma stands for as much 
and as good work as one from Harvard 
or Yale or Princeton; but college life 
means more than mere bookishness and 
cramming; nicht zvahrf 

Bayard assented with the ready re- 
sponsiveness that made strangers his 
friends at once. 

"For that matter," expanded Hanson 
with generous concession, "there are 
state universities in the West that give 
admirable courses, thorough, severe, pro- 
found; but — well, I wouldn't go there 
if all my expenses were paid." 

Sympathy for the loss sustained by 
those worthy institutions was invited by 
his manner, but he left no time for com- 
ment. 

"The Eastern universities have tradi- 
tions, customs — in short, an atmosphere 
— that gives their students an air of 
distinction. Take the Rhodes scholar- 
ships — what makes them such a prize? 
Of course, there's the merit of coming 
out on top in a sharp competition ; but 
the real prize itself is not the added 
learning to be got, but the classic atmos- 
phere of Oxford. Some of the usages 
over there are the height of absurdity, 
but they form a bond — the strongest 
kind of bond — among univ